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A 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT . . . . 



No. 70. 



FIRST REPORT 



THE TRUSTEES 



State Colony for the Insane 



AT GARDINER, 



For Eighteex Months, ending Sept'. 30, 1903 



5 ' 




BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1904. 



a^provkd by 
The State Board of Publication. 



OFFICERS OF THE STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. 



TRUSTEES 

HERBERT B. HOWARD, M.D., Chairman 
CHAS. V. DASEY, . 
EDMUND A. WHITMAN, . 
WILLIAM H. BAKER, M.D., 
Mrs. ALICE MILLER SPRING, 
Mrs. AMIE H. GOES, Secretary, 
GEORGE N. HARWOOD, 



Boston. 
Boston. 
Cambridge. 
Lynn. 

FiTCHBURG. 

Worcester. 
Barre. 



RESIDENT OFFICER. 
JOSEPH B. HOWLAND, M.D., Superintendent and Treasurer. 



Commontoealt^ Massachusetts. 



TEUSTBES' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor and to the Honorable Council. 

The trustees of the State Colony for the Insane have the 
honor to present the first annual report of this institution. 

On Dec. 18, 1901, under the provisions of chapter 451 of 
the legislative acts of the year 1900, His Excellency Governor 
Crane appointed the Board of Trustees of the State Colony for 
the Insane. 

By the wording of the appointment the trust is held * ' from 
the first Wednesday of February in the year nineteen hundred 
and two." Hence we could not legally act until that time. 

One of our first duties was to select a superintendent. Out 
of seven applicants, many of whom would have been able to 
perform our work, the Board unanimously elected Dr. Joseph 
B. Howland. He entered upon his duties on the first da}^ of 
the following April. His careful attention to his manifold 
duties has made us feel that the choice was a wise one. 

The land of the colony, situated in the towns of Gardner, 
Westminster and Ashburnham, is beautiful rolling country, 
well divided into woodland, pasture and land for tillage. The 
hills rise to 1,000 and 1,100 feet, afi"ording many beautiful 
views. 

After several visits and careful consideration by the Board, 
a location was selected for the first buildings, and the work of 
organizing and building has been despatched as fast as the 
judgment of the Board deemed it advisable. The progress 
since the time of selecting a superintendent is carefully out- 
lined in his report, which is herein contained, and we will not 
weary you by enumerating it again. 



6 



STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. [Oct. 



The tables concerning the finances, demanded by the auditor, 
are also presented. 

We heartily endorse the recommendations of the superin- 
tendent, but should like to add that a small appropriation 
ouo^ht to be allowed for land which is needed to round out the 
purchase of the State Colony for the Insane, provided the land 
can be purchased at market price, and also an appropriation for 
the erection of a suitable dumping arrangement for coal. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HERBERT B. HOWARD. 
CHAS. V. DASEY. 
EDMUND A. WHITMAN. 
WILLIAM H. BAKER. 
ALICE M. SPRINC 
AMIE H. GOES. 
GEORGE N. HARWOOD. 



1903.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — ^so. 70. 



7 



EEPORT OF THE SUPERINTE^^DEINTT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the State Colony for the Insane. 

I respectfully submit the first superintendent's report of the 
State Colony for the Insane, covering the time from my ap- 
pointment, April 1, 1902, to Sept. 30, 1903. 

Of the 1,541.51 acres of land purchased for the colony, an 
estimate has been made that 311 acres haye at some time been 
cultivated, 839 acres are pasture land, and the balance wood- 
land. The several farmhouses and barns have been examined 
for their possible usefulness. In my opinion, the only house 
suitable for occupancy by patients is the one we are at present 
using for that purpose. The house known as the Gates house, 
a small cottage, may be rented later to some officer of the 
colony. The buildings on the Goodale farm may serve a simi- 
lar purpose. One small barn, the Seaver barn, is nearly new, 
and is being used for storage. The remainder of the buildings 
are so much decayed that I do not think them of sufficient 
value to warrant an outlay of money for repairs. 

The side track, built for us in the summer of 1902 by the 
Boston & Maine Railroad Company, on the line of the Fitch- 
burg division, and the storehouse which we built beside it, have 
already proved of much value in the landing and storing of 
builders' supplies, and have, I think, saved us considerable on 
the costs of our new buildings. In the spring of last year all 
the pieces of land that had previously been ploughed but not 
seeded, about 30 acres, were sown Avith oats and grass seed. 

Durino: the summer of 1902 the buildino:s on the Hromada 
farm were repaired and enlarged to accommodate 10 patients. 
As soon as the Governor proclaimed the colony open for the 
reception of patients, Oct. 22, 1902, 5 were transferred from 
the Taunton Insane Hospital, and in December 5 more were 
sent us from the AVestborough Insane Hospital. During the 



8 



STATE COLONY FOR THE ESSAXE. [Oct. 



winter they worked in the woods, logging, cutting and drawing 
out enough logs to saw into 46,000 feet of lumber. This past 
summer they have worked at farming, and on the excavations 
for our water supply. 

The new buildings are in various stages of progress, as fol- 
lows : Men's receiving ward, masonry completed and the roof 
boarded, and building will probably be completed in December. 
Domestic building, walls of the two wings completed and the 
roofs ready to board in ; the main walls are built as far as the 
first floor. Power house, building practically completed, and 
the boilers being set at the present time. Work on the exca- 
vations of the administration building and the women's receiv- 
ing ward are being rapidly pushed, and it is expected that the 
administration building will be covered in by January 1. 
Plans for a set of farm buildings, consisting of a dormitory, 
feed barn and cow barn, are being drawn, and work on them 
will be begun this winter. 

I would respectfully recommend that money be asked for, 
for the following purposes next year, viz. : erecting and fur- 
nishing buildings for 100 patients, and for farm buildings and 
water supply for the same, $56,000 ; for constructing filter 
beds for the recei^'ing group and adjoining farms, 815,000; 
for building ice house and equipping with ice-hoisting machin- 
ery, S4,000 : for a mechanics' building (carpenter, machine and 
blacksmith shop), 86,000: for spur track and coal trestle, 
$6,000; and for machinery and tools for building and main- 
taining roads, 8650. 

In closing this report I wish to thank the members of your 
Board for the confidence the}' have shown and the support 
given me in this new work. 

JOSEPH B. HOTTLAXD, 

Superintejident. 

Gardner, Oct. 1, 1903. 



1903.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 70. 



9 



VALUATION. 



Live stock, $2,034 00 

Products of farm on hand, 1,148 67 

Wood and lumber, . . . 1,310 75 

Carriages and agricultural implements, 1,104 00 

• Beds, bedding and furniture in inmates' department, . . 878 85 

Ready-made clothing, 63 56 

Personal property in superintendent's department, 1,334 64 

( Buildings, . 40,550 60 

: Real estate < , , 

( Land 25,000 00 



173,425 07 



10 STATE COLONY FOR THE IXSAXE. 



-Got, 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Colony for the Insayie. 

I herewith submit my first report of the linaiiees of the State 
Colony for the Insane for the period beginning April 1. 
and ending Sept. 30, 1903. 

April 1, 1902, to Sept. 30, 1902. 
Receipts. 

Receired from State Treasurer from April 1, 
1902, to Sept. 30, 1902, on account of appro- 
priations under Acts of 1902, chapters 65 



and 434, . 112.917 79 

Received from sale of farm products, . . 1^ 00 



Total receipts, f 12,93 5 79 



Expenses. 

Salaries, f 1,409 98 

Labor, including teaming, .... 1,053 47 

Horses, carriages and harnesses, . . . 935 50 

Farm implements, 230 59 

Repairs of farm buildings and water supply, . 2,403 88 

Temporary administration building and stable, 1,359 06 

Storehouse, first payment, .... 2,500 00 

Miscellaneous expenses, -3,025 31 

Collected and paid State Treasurer, . . 18 00 



Total expenses, f 12,935 79 



Oct. 1, 1902, to Sept. 30, 1903. 



Receipts. 

Received from State Treasurer on account of 
appropriations under Acts of 1902, chapter 
434, section 2, to Jan. 1, 1903, . . . f 8,571 22 

Received from State Treasurer for current ex- 
penses, 7y596 02 

Received from cities and towns for support of 
patients 256 40 

Received from sale of farm products, . . 430 23 

Received from sale of junk, .... 34 50 



Total receipts f 16,888 37 



1903.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



11 



Expenses. 

Salaries, wages and labor : — 

Pay roll, 

Food : — 

Butter and butterine, 13 

Beans, 14 70 

Bread and crackers, 9 70 

Cereals, rice, meal, etc., 33 72 

Cheese 12 35 

Eggs, 19 62 

Flour 63 05 

Fish, 69 21 

Fruit, 13 25 

Meats 398 04 

Milk, . 10 

Molasses, 6 70 

Sugar, 55 03 

Tea, coffee, broma and cocoa, .... 54 21 

Vegetables, 37 70 

Sundries, 52 66 

Board, 30 00 



Clothing and clothing material : — 

Boots, shoes and rubbers, f 117 20 

Clothing, 120 60 

Dry goods for clothing, and small wares, . 33 27 

Furnishing goods, 31 50 

Hats and caps, 9 15 

Leather and shoe findings, .... 40 

Sundries, 10 75 



Furnishings : — 

Beds, bedding, table linen, etc f50 15 

Brushes, brooms, etc., 1 95 

Carpets, rugs, etc., 5 20 

Crockery, glass ware, cutlery, etc., ... 51 12 

Furniture and upholstery 119 55 

Kitchen furnishings, 81 54 

Wooden ware, buckets, pails, etc., ... 15 15 

Sundries, 29 28 



Heat, light and power : — 

Coal, 123 25 

Oil, 31 96 

Sundries, 3 40 



Amount carried forward. 



$3,943 04 



924 17 



322 87 



353 94 



58 61 



15,602 63 



12 STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. [Oct. 



Amount brought forward, $5,602 63 

Repairs and improvements : — 

Cement, lime and plaster, .... $0 35 

Doors, sashes, etc., . . . . . . 42 40 

Hardware, 208 13 

Lumber, 420 35 

Machinery, etc., 6 83 

Paints, oils, glass, etc., 33 55 

Plumbing, steam-fitting and supplies, . . 44 80 

Roofing and materials, 17 45 

Mechanics and laborers (not on pay roll), . 124 16 

Sundries, 3 63 

901 65 

Farm, stable and grounds : — 

Blacksmith and supplies, . , . . . . $77 88 

Carriages, wagons and repairs, . . . 471 12 

Fertilizers, vines, seeds, etc., .... 242 65 

Hay, grain, etc., 509 90 

Harness and repairs, 101 95 

Horses 835 00 

Cows, 794 34 

Other live stock 30 00 

Labor (not on pay roll), . . . . . 716 51 

Tools, farm machines, etc., .... 249 26 

Sundries, 68 11 

Veterinary, 2 50 

■ 4,089 22 

Miscellaneous : — 

Books, periodicals, etc., . . . . . $19 50 

Chapel services and entertainments, . . 9 82 

Freight, expressage and transportation, . . 45 43 

Hose, etc., ' . . - . 27 00 

Ice, 3 00 

Medicine and hospital supplies, ... 8 35 

Postage, 21 10 

Printing and printing supplies, ... 53 45 

Soap and laundry supplies, .... 29 58 

Stationery and oflSce supplies, .... 27 35 

Travel and expenses (oflBcials), . . 563 54 

Telephone and telegraph, , . . • . 199 72 

Tobacco, 29 40 

Sundries, 58 49 

Surveying, 23 16 

Bonding land, 50 00 

Examination of title to land, .... 15 65 

1,184 54 

Expended for new construction to Jan. 1, 1903, . . . 4,389 20 
Collected and paid State Treasurer, 721 13 



Total expenses, . . |16,888 37 



1903.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



13 



Resources. 

Unexpended balance of maintenance appro- 
priation, $5,833 98 

Due from cities and towns for support of pa- 
tients 110 40 



$5,944 38 



Special Appropriations for the Year ending Sept. 30, 1903. 



Object. 


Resolve. 


Amount. 


Expended 


Balance 
Oct. 1, 1903, 


General construction (applicable to 

maintenance to Jan. 1, 1903). 
Purchase of land, . . . . . 


1902, chap. 434, 

1903, chap. 414, 


$150,000 00 

750 00 


$53,575 66* 
750 00 


$96,424 34 


Ward for 100 patients, and furnishings. 


1903, chap. 414, 


60,000 00 




60,000 00 


Administration building and furnish- 
ings. 

Building for 25 patients, and farm 

bulldines. 
Sewage disposal, water supply, stone 

crushing plant and an additional 

boiler and dynamo. 


1903, chap. 414, 
1903, chap. 414, 
1903, chap. 414, 


33,000 00 
15,000 00 
17,000 00 




33,000 00' 
15,000 00 
17,000 00 






$275,750 00 


$54,325 66 


$221,424 34 



* Of this amount, $12,917.79 was expended prior to Oct. 1, 1902. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Gardner, Mass., Oct. 1, 1903. 



JOSEPH B. ROWLAND, 

Treasurer. 



PUBLIC DOCU^IENT 



No. 70. 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT 



THE TRUSTEES 



State Colony for the Insane 

AT GAEDNER, 
For the Year endixg Sept. 30, 1904. 




BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1905. 



Approvexj by 
Tbe Stats Board of i*usiicATi(>,N 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Report of Trustees, 7 

Report of Superintendent, 9 

Report of Treasurer, 14 

Statistical Tables, 21 



OFFICERS OF THE STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. 



TRUSTEES. 

HERBERT B. HOWARD, M.D., Chairman, Boston. 

CHAS. V. DASEY, Boston. 

EDMUND A. WHITMAN, Cajibridge. 

WILLIAM H. BAKER, M.D., Lynn. 

Mrs. ALICE MILLER SPRING, Fitchburg. 

Mrs. AMIE H. GOES, Secretary, Worcester. 

GEORGE N. HARWOOD, Barre. 



RESIDENT OFFICER. 
JOSEPH B HOWLAND, M.D., Superintendent and Treasurer. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor and to the Honorable Council. 

We have the honor to present the second annual report of 
the Trustees of the State Colony for the Insane. 

We can do little but report progress during the past year. 
A year ago we had but 10 patients, to-day we have 111. 

We were then occupying only a small farm-house ; now we 
occupy a domestic building and a building for men. The 
power house is also completed. The administration building 
and a building for 100 women will soon be finished, as will 
also a farm group one-half mile distant from the administration 
building. 

Great pains have been taken to employ what few patients 
we have for the advantage of the institution. A considerable 
amount of the grading about the buildings has been done by 
them. No contract for grading has been given out, nor is it 
the intention of the trustees to spend any of the appropriation 
therefor. They intend to leave this to be done entirely by 
patients' labor. With the farm work to be done, this grading 
may not be finished for several years. 

The trustees have discussed, and recommend, the appropria- 
tion for buildings for 100 patients for the coming year, as well 
as the minor recommendations embodied in the superintendent's 
report. 

We wish to thank the Worcester Employment Society for 
their aid during the furnishing of our first buildings. 



8 STATE COLONY FOR THE INSAISFE. [Oct. 



For details as to what has been accomplished we refer you 
to the tables and report of the superintendent, Dr. Joseph B. 
Rowland, in whose energetic and business-like management 
the trustees wish to express their continued confidence. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HERBERT B. HOWARD, 
CHAS. V. DASEY, 
EDMUND A. WHITMAN, 
WM. H. BAKER, 
AMIE H. GOES, 
ALICE M. SPRING, 
GEORGE N. HARWOOD. 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



9 



SUPERIXTE^^DEXT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Slate Colony for the Insane. 

I have the honor to submit the second annual report of the 
superintendent of the State Colony for the Insane. 

During the year the following work on buildings has been 
accomplished : the domestic building, containing the kitchen, 
laundry, bakery, dining rooms, and, in the upper story, 
quarters for officers, has been completed and has proved con- 
venient in arrangement. 

The power house has been equipped with two horizontal 
tubular boilers of 110 horse-power each and a 6(3 K. W. elec- 
tric generator direct connected to a high-speed engine, pro- 
ducing a current of 2,300 volts. This high voltage current 
permits conducting electricity for long distances on very small 
wires, thus saving large expenditures for copper wire. The 
current is transformed to 110 volts before entering any build- 
ing. Electricit}^ is being used for running water pump, 
laundry machinery and for heating laundry irons. 

Five buildings have been connected with our water system, 
the excavations being largely done by patients. Water is 
obtained from springs which empty into a storage basin, and 
from there it is pumped to a tank situated on a hill at a 
sufficient height to give good pressure to all of the buildings. 
A gasolene engine is also connected with the water pump, thus 
giving two forms of power by which it may be operated. 

A sewerage system is nearl}^ completed, composed of a 
reservoir, discharging by siphon on to filtration areas of gravel. 
The flow to the reservoir from the buildings is by gravity. 

The receiving ward for men has been completed and in use 
since last May. 

The receiving ward for women has the brickwork well along 
and the roof boards on the two wings. It is expected this 
building will be completed by Jan. 1, 1905. 



10 



STATE COLOXY FOR THE INSANE. [Oct. 



The administration building will be completed and ready 
for occupancy by the middle of November. 

A farm cottage for 25 patients is being lathed at present. 
A cow barn for 50 head of stock is practically completed and a 
feed barn is under construction. All the buildings of this 
group are of wood. The feed barn is being built b}^ our car- 
penter, with the aid of patients, from material taken from old 
barns too badly decayed to warrant repairing and from lumber 
cut on the colony. 

A coal trestle, having a capacity of 3,000 tons, has been 
built for us by the Boston & Maine Railroad Company, extend- 
ing to a point near the power house. The stone crusher, set 
up last winter, has proved very valuable. "With it we have 
crushed nearl}^ all the stone taken out in excavations from the 
several buildings, and have been able to supply contractors 
with the large amount of this product necessary for concreting 
the basements of all buildings, the floor of the cow barn, that 
used in the construction of the sewerage system and for making 
the walks. 

Patients have been employed in all departments, and many 
have shown increasing interest and efl&ciency in their work. 

During the year the whole number of patients cared for has 
been 116. One hundred and seven have been admitted during 
the year from the following sources : 1 from boarding out ; 
9 from almshouses; 25 from Westborough Insane Hospital; 
46 from Northampton Insane Hospital ; 1 from Taunton Insane 
Hospital and 25 from Worcester Insane Hospital. Three have 
been transferred to other institutions ; 2 have escaped. There 
have been no deaths. Remaining at the end of the year. 111. 

The products of the farm are shown on page 11. 

I respectfully recommend that money be asked for this year 
for the following purposes : for building for 100 patients ; for 
barns and water supply for the same; for additional engine, 
electric generator and two boilers ; and for extending sewers. 

During the year a number of our friends have sent magazines 
and papers which the patients have enjoyed very much. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH B. HOWLAND, 

Superintendent. 



1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 70. 



11 



PEODUCTS OF FAKM. 



Apples, . 


. 150 


barrels. 


r>eei, 


. 400 


pounds. 


Beets, 


30 


bushels. 


Beans, shell, . 


10 


bushels. 


Beans, string, 


12 


bushels. 


Butter, . 


. 612 


pounds 


Cabbage, 


. 3,000 


pounds. 


Carrots, . 


25 


bushels. 


CucuDQbers, . 


. 1,202 




Calves sold, . 


6 




Corn, sweet, . 


. 573 


dozen. 


Ensilage, 


80 


tons. 


Eggs, . 


653f dozen. 


Hay, 


35 


tons. 


Hay, meadow, 


3 


tons. 


Ice, 


. 134 


tons. 


Lettuce, . 


86 


heads. 






Live 


Horses, . 




8 


Cows, 




13 


Heifers, . 




32 


Calves, . 




14 



Milk, . . 20,904.5 


quarts. 


Oat fodder, . 


4i tons. 


Onions, . 


10 


bushels. 


Pears, 


6 


bushels. 


Peas, 


13 


bushels. 


Poultry, . 


231 


pounds. 


Pork, . 


810 


pounds. 


Potatoes, 


300 


bushels. 


Poles (for telephone 






and electric wires). 


75 




Posts (fence). 


50 




Radishes, 


63 


dozen. 


Squash, summer, . 


322 




Squash, winter, 


1,200 


pounds. 


Tomatoes, 


800 


pounds. 


Turnips, Swedish, . 


75 


bushels. 



Stock. 

Beef cattle, .... 3 

Bulls, 2 

Swine, 13 

Fowls, 200 



KITCHEN DEPAKTME:N^T. 



Manufactured. 

Soap, 688 pounds. 

Preserves. 

Blueberries, . . .23 quarts. Grapes, . . . .50 quarts. 
Cherries, . . .40 quarts. Pears, . . . .28 quarts. 
Crabapple jelly, . . 18 cans. Piccalilli, . . .72 quarts 
Crabapples, . . .46 quarts. 



12 STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. 



[Oct. 



SEWmG EOOM. 



Manufacttired. 

Aprons, 24 Table cloths, .... 6 

Laundry bags, . . . .18 Table covers, .... 4 

Napkins (dozen), ... 7 Sheets, . . ... .63 

Pillow cases, . . . .48 



LIST OF SALAEIES. 



Superintendent (per year), 12,500 00 

Matron (per month), 20 00 

Assistant matron (per month), 20 00 

Kitchen man (per month), 30 00 

Kitchen matron (per month), 25 00 

Dining-room man (per month), 20 00 

Dining-room matron (per month), 18 00 

Assistant kitchen man (per month), ...... 25 00 

Seamstress (per month), 20 00 

Engineer (per month), , 75 00 

Assistant engineer (two) (per month), 40 00 

Firemen (two) (per month), 30 00 

Laundry man (per month), 25 00 

Carpenter (non-resident) (per month), 60 00 

Attendants (nine) (per month), $20 00 to 30 00 

Farmer (per month), 35 00 

Farmer (per month), 25 00 

Herdsman (non-resident) (per month), 55 00 

Stableman (per month), 25 00 



1904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



13 



VALUATION. 



Real Estate. 

1,641.51 acres of land $30,000 00 

Old buildings, 800 00 

Valley house, barn and shed, .... 3,000 00 

Store-house, 6,168 00 

Temporary office and stable, .... 1,360 00 

Domestic building and fixtures, .... 45,416 00 

Men's receiving ward and fixtures, . . . 47,767 20 

Power house and fixtures, 24,554 00 

Buildings under construction, .... 64,965 00 

Waterworks, 5,240 00 

Sewers and filtration areas under construction, 6,330 00 



Total real estate, $225,600 20 

Personal Estate. 

Live stock on the farm, $2,961 00 

Produce of the farm on hand, .... 1,679 60 

Carriages and agricultural implements, . . 1,370 20 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures, . . . 2,510 00 

Beds and bedding in inmates' department, . 1,505 26 

Other furnishings in inmates' department, . 2,185 36 
Personal property of State in superintendent's 

department, 5,488 88 

Ready-made clothing, 283 00 

Provisions and groceries, 955 79 



Total personal estate, 18,938 99 



Total real and personal estate, $244,539 19 



14 STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. [Oct. 



TEBASUEER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Colony for the Insane. 

I herewith submit my second annual report of the finances 
of the State Colony for the Insane for the year ending Sept. 



30, 1904. 

Receipts. 

Applicable to maintenance : — 

All appropriations, $20,234 62 

Received from cities and towns, . . . 252 40 
Received from individuals for support of pa- 
tients, reimbursements, 14 00 

From sales, 124 00 

Rent of pastures, 138 00 



Total, . 820,763 02 

All other sources : — 
From State Treasurer on account of special appropriations, . 150,151 34 



Total receipts, $170,914 36 

Payments. 
Expenditures for maintenance : — 

Salaries, wages and labor, f 7,6 17 46 

Food : — 

Butter, $83 91 

Butterine, 51 91 

Beans, 47 97 

Crackers, 22 41 

Cereals, 103 21 

Cheese, 7 47 

Eggs, 12 50 

Flour, 487 20 

Fish, 170 54 

Fruit, 23 10 

Meats, 822 44 

Molasses, 28 75 



Amounts carried forward, .... |1,861 40 $7,617^46 



1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— Xo. 70. 



15 



Amounts brought forward. 



Sugar, . 
Tea, . 
Vegetables, 
Sundries, 



Clothing and clothing material : — 
Boots, shoes and rubbers, . 

Clothing, 

Dry goods for clothing and small ware; 
Furnishing goods, .... 

Hats and caps, 

Leather and shoe findings, . 
Sundries, 



etc. 



Furnishings : — 
Beds, bedding, table linen, 
Brushes, brooms, etc., . 
Carpets, rugs, etc., 
Crockery, glass ware, etc., 
Furniture and upholstery, 
Kitchen furnishings, . 
"Wooden ware, pails, etc., 
Sundries, 

Heat, light and power : - 
Coal, .... 
Oil, .... 
Sundries, 
Gasolene, . 



Repairs and improvements : — 
Lime, cement and plaster, . 

Lumber, 

Electrical work and supplies, 

Hardware, 

Machinery, etc., 

Paints, oils, glass, etc.. 

Plumbing, steam fitting and supplies, 

Roofing and materials. 

Mechanics and laborers (not on pay roll) 

Sundries 



Farm, stable and grounds : — 
Blacksmith and supplies, . 
Carriages, wagons and repairs, 
Fertilizers, vines, seeds, etc., 
Hay, grain, etc., . 



.?1,861 40 $7,617 46 

104 16 
98 95 
75 37 
98 57 



$426 08 
450 00 
4 22 
302 85 
20 63 
2 80 
20 11 

?567 29 
53 92 
27 55 

206 17 
75 50 

103 05 
15 33 
61 82 



f2,079 50 
168 78 
103 82 
12 41 



$15 20 
43 30 
121 00 
191 23 
334 81 
188 64 
174 58 
9 81 
304 90 
70 09 



?107 12 

190 36 
499 57 
776 95 



2.238 45 



1,226 19 



1,110 63 



2,364 51 



1.453 56 



Amounts carried forward, .... $1^74 00 $16,010 80 



1() 



STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. 



[Oct. 



Amounts brought forward. 

Harness and repairs, . 
Horses, .... 

Cows, 

Other live stock, . 
Labor (not on payroll), 
Tools, farm machines, etc., 
Sundries, .... 



Miscellaneous : — 
Books, periodicals, etc., 
Chapel services and entertainments, . 
Freight, express and transportation, . 

Hose, etc., 

Ice, 

Labor (not on pay roll), 
Medicines and hospital supplies, 
Medical attendance, nurses, etc. (extra), 

Postage, 

Printing and printing supplies, . 
Soap and laundry supplies, 
Stationery and office supplies, . 
Travel and expenses (officials). 
Telephone and telegraph, . 
Tobacco, ...... 

Sundries, 

Scales, 



$1,574 00 fl6,010 80 

93 81 
462 50 

94 00 
56 00 
15 75 

224 19 
68 73 

2,588 98 



$7 84 
12 50 
239 68 
6 00 
6 30 
10 00 



37 
2 



84 80 
77 07 
162 12 
41 46 
602 74 
193 15 
90 73 
56 83 
53 32 



1,634 84 



Total, $20,234 62 



Expenditures for all other purposes : — 

General construction, Acts 1902, chapter 434, for 
men's ward, domestic building, power house, 
etc $79,165 39 

Building for 100 patients and furnishings, Acts 

1903, chapter 414 26,682 39 

Administration building and furnishings, Acts 

1903, chapter 414, 21,052 35 

Cottage for 25 patients, barns, silos, etc., Acts 

1903, chapter 414, 4,991 00 

Sewage disposal, water supply, stone-crushing 
plant, boiler and dynamo. Acts 1903, chapter 
414, . . . 15,002 90 

Filter beds for sewage disposal, Acts 1904, chap- 
ter 323, 3,257 31 

Total 150,151 34 



Total expenditures, 



$170,385 96 



1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— Xo. 70. 



17 



Kesources and Liabilitiks. 

Resources. 

Applicable to maintenance : — 
Balance of receipts and maintenance appropriations with the 
State Treasurer, $14,679 08 

Not applicable to niaiutenance : — 
Total unexpended special appropriations, 159,723 00 



Total resources, f 174,402 08 

Liabilities. 

None. 

Balance for the Institution. 

On account of maintenance, $14,679 08 

On account of special appropriations, 159,723 00 

Total, 1174,402 08 

JOSEPH B. HOWLAND, 

Treasurer. 

Examined and approved. 

EDMUND A. WHITMAN, 
CHAS. V. DASEY, 

For the BoarO of Trustees. 



STATE COLOXY FOR THE IXSANE. [Oct. 









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Ico house, mechanics' building, hoisting ^ 
machinery, coal trestle, spur track, ^ 
road-repairing tools. Q 

Purchase of land, ) 



1904.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 70. 



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STATISTICAL TABLES. 



[Form prescribed by State Board of Insanity.] 



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L>4 STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. [Oct. 



2. — Received on First and Subsequent Admissions. 



NUMBER OF ADMISSION. 


Cases admitted. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


First (to the colony), .... 
Second (to the colony), .... 
Third (to the colony), .... 


106 


1 


107 


Total cases, ..... 


106 


1 


107 


Total persons, . . . 


106 


1 


107 



3. — Ages of Insane at First Attack and Death. 



AGES. 


Persons died. 


AT riBST ATTACK. 


AT TIME OF DEATH. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Congenital, 

15 years and less, 

FronQ 15 to 20 years, .... 

20 to 25 years, .... 

25 to 30 years, .... 

30 to 35 years, .... 

35 to 40 years, .... 

40 to 50 year?, .... 

50 to 60 years, .... 

60 to 70 ytars 

70 to 80 years 

Over 80 years, 

Total 

Unknown, 

Not insane, 

Total persons, 

Mean known ages in years. 



























904.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 







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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 70. 



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PUBLIC DOCUME^^T 



Xo. 70. 



THIRD AXXUAL REPORT 

or 

THE TRUSTEES 

OP THE 

State Coloxy for the Insane 

AT GARDNER, MASS., 
For the Year exden-g Sept. 30, 1905. 




BOSTON : 

WTaGHT A: POTTER PRDsTIXG CO., STATE PRDsTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1906. 



Approved by 
The State Board of Publication. 




CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Report of Trustees, 7 

Report of Superintendent, 9 

Report of Treasurer, 16 

Statistical Tables, 25 



OFFICERS OF THE STATE COLONY FOE THE INSANE. 



TRUSTEES. 

HERBERT B. HOWARD, M.D., Chairman, .... Boston. 

CHARLES V. DASEY Boston. 

EDMUND A. WHITMAN Cambridqb. 

WILLIAM H. BAKER, M.D Lynn. 

Mrs. ALICE MILLER SPRING Fitchburq. 

Mrs. AMIE H. COES, Secretary, Worcester. 

GEORGE N. HARWOOD Barre. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 
JOSEPH B. HOWLAND, M.D., Superintendent and Treasurer. 
CHARLES E. THOMPSON, M.D., Assistant Superintendent, 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To Eis Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

We have the honor of presenting the third annual report of 
the trustees of the State Colony for the Insane. 

The Colon}^ started the year with 111 patients, and ended 
it with 252 patients. 

The receiving group is in working order, and two of the 
outlying farms have patients living upon them, i.e.^ the Valley 
Farm" and the Belcher." A fuller description of the new 
buildings will be found in the report of the superintendent. 

The water problem of the institution gives promise of being 
satisfactorily solved by the discovery of a large gravel bed in 
the water basin on the grounds. Two wells have been driven 
in this gravel bed, and one has been dug. One of the driven 
wells has been tested, and produces twenty thousand gallons 
of water a day. The gravel bed is of sufficient area to allow 
of the driving of a great number of such wells, from twenty to 
thirty feet in depth. 

It is with satisfaction that we record the fact that the mem- 
bership of the Board of Trustees has remained unbroken dur- 
ing the time of building and organizing the institution. 

The appended tables show to some extent the work done by 
the patients. Inspection of the grounds and farms shows it 
more satisfactorily, although even this does not show all that 
has been accomplished by them. 

We would call attention to and indorse the recommendations 
of the superintendent, and would add that the trustees feel 
that it would be better to have a separate house for the super- 
intendent. 



8 STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. [Oct. 



The work of the year has progressed as rapidly as could be 
expected. 

We express again our confidence in the superintendent, Dr. 
Joseph B. Howland. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

HERBERT B. HOWARD. 
EDMUND A. WHITMAN. 
CHAS. Y. DASEY. 
GEORGE N. HA R WOOD. 
ALICE MILLER SPRING. 
WILLIAM H. BAKER. 
AMIE H. GOES. 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 9 



SUPERmTEXDEXT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Colony for the Insane. 

I respectfully submit the third annual report of the superin- 
tendent, for the year ending Sept. 30, 1905. 

In October Dr. Chas. E. Thompson, formerly assistant phy- 
sician at the State Hospital, Tewksbury, was appointed assist- 
ant superintendent. 

Patients. 

At the beginning of the year there were 111 male and no 
female patients in the institution ; at the close, 152 male and 
101 female patients, — an increase of 142. The whole num- 
ber cared for during the year has been 274. 

Of the admissions, 26 men and 71 women were transferred 
from the Northampton Insane Hospital, 30 women were trans- 
ferred from the Worcester Insane Hospital, 10 men were trans- 
ferred from the Danvers Insane Hospital, 25 men from the 
Taunton Insane Hospital, and 1 woman from boarding out. 

Seven patients who eloped have not been returned. 

There were three deaths during the year, all from clironic 
disease. As many patients as possible have been emplo3'ed in 
all departments. Among them we have found a few skilled 
workmen, but. as was to be expected, their labor has been 
largely of the simpler kind, such as work on the farm, at grad- 
ing, digging trenches and cutting wood. An average of only 
8 paid men, including teamsters, has been employed in outside 
work. 

Expenditure OF Appropriations. 

Early in the year the sewage filtration areas were completed, 
and have proved reliable and easy to care for. 

The administration building was completed and occupied 
January 1. The new frame group for 25 patients has been 



10 



STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. [Oct. 



occupied since the middle of February. The receiving ward 
for 100 women has been occupied since the 1st of June. 

Work on a new group of buildings, to accommodate 100 
male patients, is progressing favorably, and will be read}^ for 
occupancy early in the new j^ear. 

This group, built of wood, is composed of three separate 
buildings. A central one has the kitchen and dining rooms in 
the basement, which, OAving to the side hill location, is on 
three sides practically above ground. The first floor contains 
a reception room, large day room and toilet rooms. The attic 
will be used for sleeping rooms for officers. 

The remaining two buildings are one-story cottages, shaped 
like the letter H, both having dormitories for 25 patients each,* 
and a central connecting portion containing the toilet rooms, 
linen and attendants' rooms. The basement of this part to be 
used for locker rooms, heaters and coal storage. Each building 
is to be heated independently b}^ steam, and the boiler room 
of each building is of fireproof construction. Although situ- 
ated one and one-half miles from the central buildings, the 
lighting will be by electricity conducted from the central power 
plant. 

A one-story wooden building, 50 by 70 feet, to contain car- 
penter, machine and blacksmith shops, is being built by our 
own labor, and will be completed in a short time. 

About 40 acres of land with a two-story frame house in poor 
repair have been acquired. 

General. 

Considerable farm land has been brought under cultivation 
this year, and all the crops show gains over last year ; although, 
owing probably to too much wet weather, the potato yield, 
which seemed likely to be large, has been cut down 75 per 
cent, by rotting in the ground. 

Considerable o^radino^ has been done about the buildinors. 

A mile and a half of electric and telephone poles have been 
erected. These were cut during the winter on colony land. 

Last spring about three miles of road were improved by 
straightening, removing rocks and grading with a road scraper. 

Two carpenters with the aid of patients have accomplished 
considerable in the way of repairs and new work. 



1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 70. 



11 



By reference to tables on pages 12, 13 and 14, work of 
various departments may be seen. 

Many of our friends have shown their interest by sending 
to the institution reading matter, which has been much appre- 
ciated by the patients. Expressage will be gladly paid on 
magazines and books suitable for general reading. 

Recommendations . 
I would suggest that the Legislatiire be asked to appropriate 
money for the following purposes this year : to build a feed 
barn at the Belcher cottage ; to remodel the house recently 
purchased, so that it may be used to accommodate patients, 
and for building a barn in connection with the same ; to finish 
the attic of the administration building, to make room for 
accommodation of officers ; to purchase hose, reels, etc., for 
hydrant service ; to extend the permanent water supply ; and 
to make repairs on old buildings at the colony. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH B. ROWLAND, 

Superintendent. 



12 STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. [Oct. 



PEODUCTS OF FARM. 



Apples, barrels, 


yu 


Milk, pounds, . 


01 ,O0i 


Beef, pounds, . 




Onions, bushels, . 


't. 


Beets, bushels, . 


Q - 

60 


Parsnips, bushels, 


on 


Beet greens, bushels, 


Jo 


Pears, bushels, . 


9 


Beans, shell, bushels. 




Peas, bushels, . 




Beans, string', bushels, 


12 


Poultry, pounds. 




Cabbage, heads. 


. 650 


Pork, pounds, . 


. 1,755 


Carrots, bushels. 


. 40 


Potatoes, bushels, 


. 388 


v/iitji iitJo, uusiieis, . ■ 


8 


Poles (electric wire), 


80 


Cucumbers . . , 


. 493 


Posts (fence), . 


40 


Calves sold, 


5 


Radishes, dozen, 


. 9.5 


Corn, sweet, dozen ears, . 


. 736 


Squash (summer), dozen. 


. 101 


Corn ensilage, tons, 


. 150 


Squash (winter), pounds. 


. 2,570 


Ecrirs do7Pn 


. 994 


Tomatoes, pounds, . 


. 866 


Hay, tons, , 


. 59 


Turnips (Swedish), bushels. 


. 1,535 


Hay, meadow, tons, . 


5 


Turnips (white), bushels. 


. 21 


Hay, second crop, tons, . 


6 


Yeal, pounds, . 


. 205 


Hides sold, pounds, . 


. 14 


Wood (hard), cords, 


. 40 


Ice, tons, .... 


. 252 


Wood (soft), cords, . 


. 14 


Lettuce, dozen, 


. 366 








Lite Stock. 




Horses, .... 


. 10 


Hogs 


6 


Cows, .... 


. 27 


Shotes, .... 


17 


Heifers, .... 


7 


Shotes (small). 


. 18 


Calves, .... 


6 


Pigs 


7 


Bulls 


2 


Hens, .... 


. 207 


Steers, .... 


5 







KITCHEX DEPAETMEXT. 



Manufactured. 

Soap (pounds), 1,183 

Presertes. 

Blackberries, quarts, . . 21 Peaches, quarts, ... 21 
Blueben-ies, quarts, . . . 43 j Pears, quarts, .... 20 
Cherries, quarts, . . .85 Piccalilli, quarts, ... 12 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 70. 



13 



SEWIXG ROOM. 



Manufactured. 



Abdominal belt, 


. 1 


Nightgowns, 


. 89 


Aprons (carpenters'), 


3 


Pillow cases. 


. 631 


Aprons (men's), 


. 64 


Sheets, 


. 823 


Aprons (women's), . 


. 50 


Shirts (outing), 


. 52 


Bibs, 


. 82 


Skirts, 


. 113 


Chemise, .... 


. 161 


Slings, 


6 


Curtains, .... 


. 142 


Stand covers, . 


2 


Drawers, .... 


. 169 


Table cloths, . 


12 


Eye shades, 


6 


Towels, 


. 1,244 


Holders, .... 


6 


Waists, 


1 


Jackets, .... 


1 


Uniforms, . 


1 


Laundry bags, . 


. 57 






Napkins, .... 


. 138 


Total, 


3,854 



Articles mended. 



2,688 



CAEPEXTER. 



1 attic (six rooms finished). 


1 


ice house. 


1 barn, 32 by 50 feet. 


1 


piggery, 56 by 14 feet. 


1 barn shingled. 


1 


refrigerator. 


6 box stalls. 


1 


summer house. 


2 battery boxes. 


1 


silo, 16 by 30 feet. 


9 benches. 


1 


spring house. 


1 bread trough. 


1 


storm porch. 


23 curtains hung. 


2 


sheds. 


43 cross arms and braces placed on 


7 


screen doors. 


electric poles. 




Shelves for vault. 


1 dining room truck. 


17 


settees for wards. 


Dispensary bottle cases and 


1 


tank house. 


desks. 


4 


tables (dining). 


2 feed boxes. 


3 


tables (kitchen). 


House connecting barn and silos. 


2 


tables (serving). 


12 floor swabs. 


2 


tables (sewing). 


1 house shingled. 


3 


tables (ward). 


1 hen house. 


1 


ward floor laid. 



14 



STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. [Oct. 



COBBLER. 



Shoes tapped, pairs, 
Shoes heeled, pairs. 
Shoes patched, 



83 
142 
227 



Slippers repaired, pairs, . 156 
Harnesses repaired, . 4 



LIST OF SALAEIES. 



Superintendent (per year), $2,500 00 

Assistant superintendent (per year), 1,200 00 

Clerk (per month), 30 00 

Matron (per month), 20 00 

Assistant matron (per month), 20 00 

Kitchen men (two) (per month), $25 00 to 35 00 

Kitchen matron (per month), 25 00 

Dining-room man (per month), 25 00 

Dining-room matron (per month), 18 00 

Seamstress (per month), . . . • . . . . . 25 00 

Housekeepers (two) (per month), $18 00 to 22 00 

Engineer (per month), . . . . . . . . • 83 33 

Assistant engineers (two) (per month), 40 00 

Firemen (two) (per month), 30 00 

Fireman (non-resident) (per month), 60 00 

Laundry man (per month) , 25 00 

Laundress (per month), 25 00 

Carpenters (two) (non-resident) (per month), ... 60 00 

Attendants (11 male) (per month), $20 00 to 30 00 

Attendants (7 female) (per month), 18 00 to 25 00 

Farmers (three) (per month) , 25 00 to 40 00 

Herdsman (non-resident) (per month), 55 00 

Stableman (per month), 25 00 

Teamster (per month) , . 25 00 



1905. PUBLIC DOCUMEXT— No. 70. 15 



VALUATIOjST. 

Real Estate. 



Land, 1,581.51 acres, $54,374 00* 

Old buildings, 800 00 

Valley house, barn and sheds, .... 3,000 00 

Nutting house, 600 00 

Belcher cottage and barns, .... 15,500 00 

Temporary office and stable, .... 1,360 00 

Administration building, 31,365 00 

Domestic building, 45,416 00 

Men's receiving ward, 47,949 00 

Women's receiving ward, 57,740 00 

Power house and fixtures, 24,554 00 

Pump houses and fixtures, 1,500 00 

Storehouse 6,168 00 

New buildings under construction, . . . 22,950 00 



Total real estate $313,276 00 

Personal Estate. 

Provisions and groceries, $881 84 

Ready-made clothing and dry goods, . . 171 48 
Personal property of State in superintendent's 

department 8,898 45 

Beds and bedding in inmates' department, . 4,438 92 

Other furnishings in inmates' department, . 1,523 98 

Property and fuel in power plant, . . . 2,446 13 

Machinery, mechanical fixtures and supplies, . 3,818 07 

Live stock on farm, 5,724 50 

Produce of farm on hand, 2,689 90 

Carriages, agricultural implements and sup- 
plies, 2,709 35 



Total personal estate, 33,302 62 



Total real and personal estate, $346,578 62 



* Includes sewer beds, water pipes, etc. 



16 



STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. [Oct. 



TKEASUEEK'S EEPOET. 



To the Trustees of the State Colony for the Insane. 

I respectfully submit the following report of the finances of 
the colony for the year ending Sept. 30, 1905 : — 

Receipts. 

Applicable to maintenance : — 
Balance in State treasury at beginning of the 



year, $14,679 08 

All appropriations for maintenance, . . . 51,950 00 
Receipts from individuals for support of patients, 

reimbursements, 236 78 

From sales : — 

Farm, stable and grounds, .... 24 21 

Miscellaneous, 6 15 

From rental of pastures, 65 00 

From State Treasurer on account of special 

appropriations, 115,340 63 



Total receipts 1 182,301 85 



Payments. 

Expenditures for maintenance : — 
Salaries, wages and labor, .... 

Food : — 
Butter and butterine. 
Beans, . 
Crackers, 
Cereals, 
Cheese, 

Eggs. • 
Flour, . 
Fish, . 
Fruit, . 
Meats, . 

Amounts carried forward. 



$16,278 26 



$714 19 
154 22 
69 75 
358 05 
24 35 
23 70 
1,540 75 
521 88 
96 52 
2,278 74 



$5,782 15 $16,278 26 



1905.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



17 



Amounts brought forward. 



$5,782 15 $16,278 26 



Molasses, 
Sugar, . 

Tea, coffee and cocoa. 
Vegetables, . 
Sundries, 



Clothing and clothing material : — 
Boots, shoes and rubbers, . 

Clothing, 

Dry goods for clothing and small wares. 
Furnishing goods, .... 

Hats and caps, 

Leather and shoe findings, . 
Sundries, 



Furnishings : — 
Beds, bedding, table linen, etc., . 
Brushes, brooms, etc , 
Carpets, rugs, etc., 
Crockery, glassware, cutlery, etc. 
Furniture and upholstery, . 
Kitchen furnishings, . 
Wooden ware, buckets, pails, etc., 
Sundries, 



Heat, light and power : 
Coal, . 
Wood, . 



68 62 
707 58 
245 50 
319 59 
340 92 



$373 31 
1,139 49 
166 45 
38 05 
49 31 
55 14 
4 51 



$920 20 
102 49 

57 37 
204 20 
652 49 
173 24 

30 40 
136 30 



Gasoline, 
Oil, . 

Sundries, 



Repairs and improvements : — 

Bricks, 

Cement, lime and plaster, . 
Doors, sashes, etc., . 
Electrical work and supplies, 

Hardware, 

Lumber, 

Machinery, etc., 

Paints, oils, glass, etc., 

Plumbing, steam fitting and supplies, 

Roofing and materials. 

Mechanics and laborers (not on pay roll), 

Sundries, . . . . . 



$7,536 07 
50 00 
69 41 
138 84 
121 05 



$48 73 

66 48 
147 00 
439 71 
381 11 

1,218 85 

67 14 
236 00 

1,424 65 
26 45 
476 33 
165 76 



7,464 36 



1,826 26 



2,276 69 



7,915 37 



4,698 21 



Amount carried forward, $40,459 15 



18 STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. [Oct. 



Amount brought forward^ $40,459 15 

Farm, stable and grounds : 

Blacksmith and supplies, $140 78 

Carnages, wagons and repairs, .... 296 05 

Fertilizers, vines, seeds, etc., .... 782 47 

Hay, grain, etc., . 1,930 29 

Harness and repairs, 143 00 

Horses, 225 00 

Other live stock, 26 00 

Labor (not on pay roll), 31 24 

Tools, farm machines, etc., .... 450 66 

Sundries, 119 10 

4,144 59 

Miscellaneous : — 

Books, periodicals, etc., $17 75 

Chapel services and entertainments, ... 30 68 

Freight, expressage and transportation, . . 531 07 

Labor (not on pay roll), 18 00 

Medicines and hospital supplies, . . . 594 77 

Postage, 57 59 

Printing and printing supplies, .... 127 01 

Printing annual report, 86 26 

Return of runaways, 27 05 

Soap and laundry supplies, .... 264 21 

Stationery and oflSce supplies, .... 232 18 

Travel and expenses (officials), . . . 451 38 

Telephone and telegraph, 293 80 

Tobacco, 211 12 

Sundries, 97 60 

3,040 47 

Total, $47,644 21 

Expenditures for all other purposes : — 

General construction. Acts 1902, chapter 434, . $17,211 07 

Building for 100 patients and furnishing same, 

Acts 1903, chapter 414, . . . ' . . 33,238 58 

Administration building and furnishing same, 

Acts 1903, chapter 414, 11,940 21 

Cottage for 25 patients, barns, silos, etc., Acts 

1903, chapter 414, 10,008 71 

Sewage disposal, water supply, etc.. Acts 1903, 

chapter 414, 1,842 11 

Building and furnishings for patients, with 
barn and water supply. Acts 1904, chapter 

323, 21,255 00 

Filter beds for sewage disposal, Acts 1904, chap- 
ter 323, 10,695 81 



Amounts carried forward. 



$106,191 49 $47,644 21 



1905.] 



PUBLir- DnCOrEXT— No. 70. 



19 



JmoufUs brought forward, .... f 106,191 49 ^7,644 21 



Mechanics^ building, coal trestle, etc.. Acts 1904, 

chapter 323, 8^49 14 

Purchase of land. Acts 1904, chapter 323. . . 800 00 

Total 115340 63 

Total expenditures, $162,984 84 

Balance of receipts and maintenance appropria- 
tions vrith State Treasurer SepL 30, I9a5, . $17,054 06 

Amount of unexpended balance of maintenance 
appropriadon Dec. 31, 1904, . . . . 2.112 95 

Amount of unexpended appropriation for an- 
nual report^ 150 00 

19317 01 

$182301 85 



Rksourges ahd Liabujtibs. 
Bewurces. 

Applicable to maintenance : — 
Balance of receipts and maintenance appropria- 



tions with State Treasurer, .... f 17,054 06 
Bills due from indiYiduais for support of pa- 
tients, 171 80 

Total. f 17,225 86 

Not applicable to maintenance : — 
Total unexpended special appropriations. .... 108,382 37 

Total resources, $125,608 23 

LiabHiiies. 

None. 



JO.-EPH B. HfJWLAXD. 

Treasurer. 

Examined and approTed : EDMUXD A. WHITMAN, 
CHAS. V. DASEY, 

For the Board of Tnutees. 



20 



STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. [Oct. 



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



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1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



23 



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STATISTICAL TABLES. 



[Form prescribed by State Board of Insanity.] 



1. — General Statistics of the Year. 





ISSASE. 




Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Patients in colony Oct. 1, 1904, 


Ill 


- 


Ill 


Admitted within the year, 


63 


102 


165 


Viz. : by transfer, .... 


61 


102 


163 


from visit,* 






2 


from escape, .... 


- 


- 


- 


Whole number of cases within the year, 


174 


102 


276 


Dismissed within the year. 


22 


1 


23 


Viz : Discharged : — . 


5 


- 


5 


as recovered at time of leav- 
ing hospital, 
as much improved, . 


3 
1 


- 
- 


3 
1 


as improved, .... 


- 


- 


- 


as not improved, 


1 


- 


1 


as not insane 


- 


- 


- 


Died, 


3 


- 


3 


Transferred, .... 


3 


1 


4 


Escaped, 


7 


- 


7 


On visit Oct. 1, 1905, . 


4 


- 


4 


Patients remaining Sept. 30, 1905, . 


152 


101 


253 


Viz. : supported as State patients, 


152 


101 


253 


as private patients, . 








Number of different persons within the 


1 "70 

172 


102 


274 


year. 

Number of different persons admitted, . 


61 


102 


163 


Number of different persons recovered. 


3 


_ 


3 


Daily average number of patients. 


137.857 


27.993 


165.85 


Viz. : State patients, . . 


137.857 


27.993 


165.85 


private patients, 









* Includes 2 patients absent on visit at beginning of year, and nominally admitted 
for discharge. 



28 STATE COLO>'Y FOR THE IS'SAXE. [Oct. 



2. — Received on First and Subsequent Admissions. 





Cases adjcittxxi. 


Mice 




Tc"3l5. 


First (to the colony), 




1(<2 


163 


Second (to the colony), 








Third (to the colony) , 








Totmle»ses, 




102 


163 













5. — Ages o f Insane at First Attaek and Death. 







Pebso 


5 DrSD. 






AGES. 


AT ITBST ATTACK. 


AT TEICK OP DEATH. 




Males. 




1 ;-..al!. 




rema!es. 


Totals. 


Cmgenital, 














15 vears ari '.e-s, 




























2§ to 30 years, .... 


1 




1 








30to33yemiB, .... 






- 








33 to 40 years 








: 






40 to 5C years, . . . . 


1 




1 


2 




2 


30 to 60 years 


1 




1 


1 




1 


60 to TO years 














10 to 8.7. a- . . . . 














Orer 80 years, 














Total, 


3 




3 


3 




3 


Unknown, 














Not insane, 














Total i)€rs DBS, 


3 




3 


3 




3 


ilea- ages in years. 


42.33 




42.33 


48.33 




48.33 





1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



29 



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30 



STATE COLONY FOE THE INSANE. 



[Oct. 



Total 
Discharges 
and Deaths. 






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' ' ' ' ' ' j ' ' ' 






Died. 


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FORM OF DISEASE. 


B. — Other admissions : — 

Congenital mental deficiency, . 
Dementia, organic, . 
Dementia, prsecox, . 
Dementia, senile. 
Dementia, terminal, . 
Epileptic insanity, . 
Hysterical insanity, . 
Manic-depressive insanity. 
Melancholia, involution, . 
Myxoedematous insanity, . 

Paranoia, alcoholic, . 
Toxic insanity (alcohol). 

Aggregate cases 

Aggregate persons 



1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



31 





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STATE COLOXY FOR THE IXSAXE. 



[Oct. 



■ 


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CAUSES OF DEATH. 


Epilepsy, .... 
General paralysis, . 
Pulmonary tuberculosis, 

Totals 



1905.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 70. 



Ed a3 



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34 



STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. [Oct. 1905. 



J 5 



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11—11 



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<5 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT 



No. 70. 



FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 



THE TEUSTEES 



State Colony for the Insane 

AT GARDNER, MASS., 

I OK THE 

Fourteen Months ending Xovember 30, 1906. 




BOSTON: 

WEIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1907. 



Approved by 
The State Board of Publication 



co:n^te]s^ts. 



PAQB 

Report of Trustees, . 7 

Report of Superintendent, . . 9- 

Report of Treasurer, 17 

Statistical Tables 2d 



OFFICEES OF THE STATE COLONY FOE THE INSANE. 



TRUSTEES. 

EDMUND A. WHITMAN, Chairman Cambridge. 

HERBERT B. HOWARD, M.D Boston. 

GEORGE N. HARWOOD, Barre. 

WILLIAM H. BAKER, M.D., Lynn. 

Mrs. ALICE MILLER SPRING Fitchburg. 

Mrs. AMIE H. COES, Secretary Worcester. 

JOHN G. BLAKE, M.D., Boston. 

RESIDENT OFFICERS. 
JOSEPH B, HOWLAND, M.D. , . . . Superintendent and Treasurer. 

CHAS. E. THOMPSON, M.D Assistant Superintendent. 

WILLIAM F. FARMER, M.D., . . . Assistant Physician. 



Commoniirealtb of P^assatbusetts. 



TEUSTEES* EEPORT. 



To His Exctllency the Oovemor and the Honorable Council. 

We have the honor to present the fourth annual report of the 
trustees of the State Colony for the Insane. 

During the past year the colony has grown rapidly. The 
Westminster group of buildings has been completed, and is 
now occupied. 

A new group, adapted to the care of 100 patients, is sub- 
stantially completed, and will be ready for occupancy by the 
first of next year. The O'Connor house has l)eeu repaired and 
enlarged, and will be ready for occupancy in the near future. 

These buildings, with the Valley house and Belcher cottage, 
are built of wood, and accommodate almost 300 patients. 

While the central group of buildings is of brick, and of fire- 
resisting construction, the trustees have not felt that the nature 
of the colony plan with which they are asked to experiment, 
or the conditions under which they are working, justified them 
in the erection of brick buildings in the outlying or fanii 
groups. 

While we are entirely satisfied that the interests of the Com- 
monwealth are best served by such wooden constructions, we 
do not minimize the danger to insane patients fi'om fire, and, 
while every precaution is taken against it, we do feel that an 
adequate and permanent water system should be promptly 
installed. We therefore renew our recommendation of last 
year, that the Legislature be asked to appropriate money to 
extend the permanent water supply. 

The work of feeding our patients from the produce of the 
farms is being extended as rapidly as possible, but we are 



8 STATE COLONY FOR THE IXSAXE. [Dec. 



handicapped by lack of barn facilities. AVe again ask for an 
appropriation to build a new feed barn at the Belcher cottage. 

Oar herd of cows is being constantly increased, and more 
horses and farm wagons are needed. 

The growth of the colony has necessitated an increased 
number of officers, room for some of whom has been made by 
fitting up the attic of the administration building with nine 
bedrooms. 

We have also found it necessary to appoint a second assist- 
ant physician. This increase is pressing upon the quarters 
assigned to the superintendent, and we think the time has now 
come when he should be lodged in a separate house. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDMUND A. WHITMAN. 
GEORGE N. HARWOOD. 
AMIE H. GOES. 
HERBERT B. HOWARD. 
WILLLAJl H. BAKER. 
JOHN G. BLAKE. 
ALICE MILLER SPRING. 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 70. 



9 



SUPERINTENDENT'S EEPORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Colony for the Insane. 

I respectfully submit the fourth annual report of the super- 
intendent, 

The statistical tables concerning patients are for the year 
ending Sept. 30, 1906, while the financial tables are for four- 
teen months, ending Nov. 30, 1906. 

Patients. 

At the beginning of the year there were 152 male patients 
and 101 female patients, — a total of 253. There have been ad- 
mitted during the year 184, of which 65 men were transferred 
from the Danvers Insane Hospital ; 57 men and 32 women, — a 
total of 89, from the Worcester Insane Hospital ; and 30 men 
from the Northampton Insane Hospital ; making the number 
of patients in the colony Sept. 30, 1906, 278 men and 125 
women, — a total of 403. The whole number of patients cared 
for during the year has been 312 men and 133 women, — a 
total of 445. Thirty-four men and 8 women have been dis- 
charged, 2 as recovered, 3 as capable of self-support, 1 as im- 
proved, 1 not improved. Twelve men and 8 women have been 
transferred to other institutions. Six men have eloped and 3 
men were out on visit Oct. 1, 1906. Six men have died, all 
from chronic disease. The general health of the patients dur- 
ing the year has been good. 

A large majority of the men have either been employed in 
outside work or have been inside workers, having a parole for 
some part of the day ; while nearly all of the others, including 
the women, have been out for daily walks. During the summer 
many of the women went out berry-picking, sometimes taking 
dinner with them, making the trips pleasant outings. 

During the past winter about 1,000 tons of stone were 



10 



STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. [Dec. 



broken up for the stone crusher, of which some 800 tons were 
crushed in the spring. The winter occupations were clearing 
out brush in the woods, cutting trees for making electric and 
telephone poles, fence posts and cord wood. During the past 
summer much grading has been done ; a mile of electric wire 
poles has been set up ; sewer and water pipe trenches, amount- 
ing to about 4,000 feet, have been dug. Much stone has been 
removed from partially cleared land, and the regular farm work 
has been considerably increased. A number of acres of pas- 
ture, which had become grown over with bushes and trees, 
have been cleared, giving much additional grazing land. 

Expenditure of Appropriations. 

The Westminster cottages, which were completed early in the 
year, now care for 102 men and 4 women. We occupy three 
groups of cottages, — one of 13 patients, one of 32 and one 
of 106. Comparing the conditions in each, I cannot help feel- 
ing that 100 is too large a unit for the best welfare of the colony 
class of patients. It is true, of course, that it is more economi- 
cal to administer for 100 than for 50 ; but taking the patients 
as they can be selected, many of the features too nearly resem- 
ble those of any large institution, — that is, there cannot be 
the informality which prevails in the smaller groups, making 
the patients feel more at home, and eliminating much of the 
appearance of their being watched. At the Belcher cottage, 
where there are now 29 men, the majority of whom would Jaave 
run away at first, there is now no attempt to do so, and I be- 
lieve this to be largely due to the absence of apparent restraint. 

Two boilers of 110 horse-power each and a direct-connected 
electric generator of 70 K.W. have been installed in the power 
plant, and are in successful operation. 

The work of covering these boilers and the additional piping, 
together with three low-pressure boilers at the Westminster 
group and considerable piping in various places, with asbestos 
cement and magnesia covering, has been done in a very satis- 
factory way by our own help. 

It is to be regretted that we did not receive the appropria- 
tion asked for, for extending the permanent water supply, as 
we must depend for the present on an artesian well to be 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 70. 11 



drilled at the new group of buildings for 100, which are now 
about completed. 

The mechanics' building, built of wood by our own carpen- 
ters and patients entirely, has been finished and in use for 
several months. 

The attic of the administration building, for which we re- 
ceived money for finishing into rooms for officers, has now 
been practically completed. 

Painting of the exteriors of two and part of the interiors of 
two of the older buildings has been done. 

General. 

In October Dr. Wm. F. Farmer, Harvard Medical School, 
1904, and formerly an interne at the State Hospital, was ap- 
pointed assistant physician, an additional medical officer being 
needed on account of the growth of the institution. 

Recently the Boston & Maine Railroad built us a station ; 
this fills a much-needed want. 

I have to record the sudden and unexpected death of one of 
our officers from a pulmonary hemorrhage, after a few days of 
what seemed a not serious illness. 

A nucleus for a library has been started by the gift from the 
Massachusetts General Hospital of 214 volumes of standard 
light reading, and this we shall hope to increase each year for 
the benefit of patients and officers. 

By consulting the tables following this report will be seen the 
increased amount of work accomplished in all departments, and 
especially gratifying is the extension of the farm work. 

Amusements. 

The holidays have been appropriately observed. During the 
summer, ball games have been played on Saturday afternoons, 
often by teams from the different groups, giving a pleasant 
spirit of rivalry, the places on the teams being largely filled by 
patients. Dances were held every two weeks last winter, and 
were much enjoyed by the patients. Occasional other enter- 
tainments have been held. A number of our friends have 
given magazines, and I wish to take this opportunity to again 
thank them. 



12 



STATE COLONY FOK THE INSANE. [Dec. 



Eecommexdatioxs . 

I recommend that the Legislature be asked to appropriate 
money for those things which were refused last year, viz., for 
extending the permanent water supply, and for building a large 
feed barn and stable at the Belcher cottage. 

I also recommend that we be given permission to establish a 
burying ground on the colony land, and to bury our own dead, 
as we are some distance from the town. 

Respectfull}' submitted. 

JOSEPH B. HOWLAXD, 

Superintendent 



1906.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



13 



PRODUCTS OF FARM. 



Apples, barrels. 


56 


Milk, pounds. 


160,346 


Beans, shelled, bushels. 


23 


Onions, bushels. 


4 


Beans, string, bushels, . 


22 


Parsnips, bushels, . 


15 


Beef, pounds, 


. 1,634 


Pears, bushels. 


5 


Beet greens, bushels. 


31 


Peas, bushels. 


. 50.5 


Beets, bushels. 


93 


Pork, pounds. 


. 9,717 


Blackberries, quarts, 


. 786 


Potatoes, bushels, . 


. 992 


Blueberries, quarts, 


. 1,150 


Poultry, pounds, 


. 492 


Cabbage, pounds, . 


. 11,365 


Poles (electric wire). 


78 


Calves sold, . 


19 


Posts (fence). 


100 


Carrots, bushels, . 


31 


Radishes, dozen, 


. 98.5 


Corn, sweet, dozen ears, 


. 906 


Raspberries, quarts, 


. 300 


Corn, ensilage, tons, 


. 200 


Squash, summer, dozen, 


. 122 


Eggs, dozen, . 


. 1,164 


Squash, winter, pounds. 


. 3,130 


Hay, tons, 


88 


Tomatoes, pounds. 


. 1,829 


Hay, meadow, tons. 


8 


Turnips, Swedish, bushels. 


. 152 


Hay, second crop, tons, . 


16 


Turnips, white, bushels. 


65 


Hides sold, pounds, 


. 217 


Veal, pounds, . 


91 


Ice, tons, 


. 290 


Wood, hard, cords, 


30 


Lettuce, heads, 


. 2,019 


Wood, soft, cords, . 


10 


Mangel-wurzels, bushels, 


182 








Live 


Stock. 




Horses, .... 


11 


Steers, .... 


7 


Cows 


43 


Hogs 


7 


Heifers 


10 


Shotes, .... 


38 


Calves, .... 


15 


Shotes, young. 


16 


Bulls 


2 


Hens, .... 


. 309 



KITCHEX DEPARTMENT. 



Soap (pounds), 



Manufactukkd. 



Apple jelly, quarts, 
Blackberries, quarts. 
Blueberries, quarts. 
Cherries, quarts, 
Grapes, quarts, 



1,054 



Preserves, etc. 



30 
173 
426 
20 
46 



Grape jelly, quarts. 
Pears, quarts, . 
Raspberries, quarts. 
Piccalilli, quarts, . 



152 
30 
16 
47 



14 



STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. 



[Dec. 



SEWING ROOM. 



Manufactured. 



Aprons (carpenters'), 


7 


Holdprs 




Aprons (laundry),. 


3 


Jumper, . . . . 


1 


Aprons (men's), 


49 


Laundry bags. 




Aprons (operating), 


4 


Mittens, .... 


4 


Aprons (women's), 


104 


Napkins, . f . . 


120 


Bandages, . . . 


23 


Ni crht crowns 


70 


Bibs, .... 


170 


Overalls, 


1 


Box covers, 


2 


Pillow cases, . 


. 587 


Burial robes, . 


27 


Sheets, . . . . 


. 1,078 


Carriage cover. 


1 


Shirts (hospital), . 


39 


Collars, .... 


3 


Shirts (outing). 


. 576 


Corset covers, 


16 


Skirts, . . . . 


. 288 


Chair cushion, 


1 


Stretcher, 


1 


Chemises, 


64 


Suspenders, . 


59 


Curtains, 


42 


Table cloths, . 


. 25 


Dishwasher pad, 


1 


Table covers, small, 




Drawers, 


76 


Towels, . . . . 


, 2,381 


Dresses, .... 


165 






Dress skirts, . 


2 


Total, 


. 6,084 


Fracture swathe, . 


1 






Articles mended, . 






. 9,978 



CARPENTER. 



2 bread boxes. 
22 bread trays. 
1 bread trough. 

1 box stall. 

2 bulletin boards, 
1 cabinet (filing). 
1 cabinet (key). 

1 cabinet (laundry). 
1 carriage house. 
42 cross arms and braces placed on 
electric poles. 
1 farm house entirely remodelled 
inside ready for plasterers. 

Window o:uards 



1 feed truck. 
1 milk house. 
1 roof slated. 
108 screens. 
7 screen doors. 
1 stage for amusement hall. 
1 storm porch. 
3 stone boats. 
35 M. shingles laid. 
3 tables (dining). 
3 tables (kitchen). 
1 table (ironing). 
1 table (ward), 
on three buildings. 



1906.] 



PraLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 70. 



15 



COBBLER. 



Heels, pairs, .... 239 Taps and heels, . . .338 
Taps, pairs, .... 35 Harnesses mended, . 3 
Patches, 1,000 | 



LIST OF SALARIES. 



Superintendent (per year), 
Assistant superintendent (per year). 
Assistant physician (per year), 
Clerk (per month), .... 
Stenographer (per month). 
Supervisors (four male) (per month). 
Supervisor (one female) (per month). 
Kitchen men (two) (per month). 
Cooks (two) (per month). 
Kitchen assistant (one) (per month). 
Dining-room man (one) (per month). 
Dining-room matron (one) (per month). 
Housekeepers (seven) (per month). 
Seamstress (one) (per month). 
Engineer (one) (per month), 
Assistant engineers (two) (per month). 
Firemen (three) (per month), . 
Laundry man (one) (per month). 
Laundress (one) (per month), . 
Attendants (twenty male) (per month), 
Attendants (seven female) (per month). 
Herdsman (non-resident) (per month). 
Stableman (per month), . 



f2,oOO 00 
1,500 CO 
700 00 
35 00 
25 00 
f 30 00 to 45 00 
30 00 
$25 00 to 40 00 
25 00 to 30 00 
18 00 
25 00 
18 00 
$2 ) 00 to 25 00 
25 00 
83 33 
f 40 00 to 45 00 
30 00 
25 00 
25 00 
S20 00 to 25 00 
18 00 to 20 00 
55 00 
30 00 



Hi STATE COLONY FOR THE INSAXE. [Dec. 



YALUATION. 



Real Estate. 

Land, 1,581.51 acres, $57,436 00 

Old buildings, 800 00 

Valley house, barn and sheds, .... 3,061 60 

Nutting house, 1,618 33 

Belcher cottage and barns, .... 15,500 00 

Temporary office and stable, .... 1,360 00 

Administration building, 3-1,062 18 

Domestic building, 45,416 00 

Men's receiving ward, 47,949 00 

Women's receiving ward, 57,740 00 

Power house and fixtures, 32,553 99 

Pump houses and fixtures, 1,647 00 

Storehouse, 6,168 00 

Westminster cottages and barn, , . . 49,827 62 

Mechanics' building, 4,581 39 

New buildings under construction, . . . 33,686 33 



Total real estate, 1393,407 44 

Personal Estate. 

Provisions and groceries, f 1,864 52 

Ready-made clothing, 838 36 

Dry goods, 365 12 

Personal property of State in superintendent's 

department, 9,615 88 

Beds and bedding in inmates' department, . 6,985 48 

Other furnishings in inmates' department, . 3,150 27 

Property and fuel in power plant, . . . 2,264 55 

Machinery, mechanical fixtures and supplies, . 5,117 30 

Live stock on farm 5,863 50 

Produce of the farm on hand, .... 3,562 29 
Carriages, agricultural implements and sup- 
plies, 3,646 15 

Drugs and medicines, 384 19 

Tobacco 121 90 

Other supplies undistributed, .... 2,403 37 



Total personal estate, 46,182 88 



Total real and personal estates, 



.?439,590 32 



1306.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



17 



TREASUREK'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Colony for the Insane. 

I respectfully submit the following report of the finances of 
the colon}' from Oct. 1, 1905, to Nov. 30, 1906 : — 

Receipts. 

Applicable to maintenance : — 

Balance in State treasury on Oct. 1, 1905, . 

All appropriations for maintenance, . 

Unexpended income credited by State Treasurer, 

Receipts from individuals for support of pa- 
tients, reimbursements, 

Credited by State Board of Insanity, . 

Sales : — 

Farm, stable and grounds, .... 

Miscellaneous, 

Rental of pastures, 

Labor, 

All other sources, 

From State Treasurer on account of special 
appropriations, 

Total receipts, 

Payments. 



Expenditures for maintenance : — 

Salaries, wages and labor, $25,438 47 

Food : — 

Butter and butterine, ^1,464 83 

Beans, 278 23 

Crackers, 159 75 

Cereals, 553 15 

Cheese, 35 41 

Eggs, 44 46 

Flour, 3,539 40 

Fish, 1,059 40 

Fruit, 211 86 

Meats, 3,542 68 



$17,054 06 
59,200 00 
1,270 58 

947 80 
216 00 

37 99 
70 66 
65 00 
5 33 
55 84 

84,023 45 
$162,946 71 



Amou7its carried forward, .... $10,889 17 125,438 47 



18 



STATE COLONY FOE THE INSANE. [Dec. 



Amou7its brought forward, 

Molasses, .... 

Sugar, 

Tea, coffee and cocoa, 
Vegetables, 

Sundries, .... 



Clothing and clothing material : — 
Boots, shoes and rubbers, . 

Clothing, 

Dry goods for clothing, and small wares, 
Furnishing goods, .... 

Hats and caps, 

Leather and shoe findings, . 
Sundries, 



Furnishings : — 
Beds, bedding, table linen, etc., . 
Brushes, broouis, etc., 
Carpets, rugs, etc., 
Crockery, glassware, cutlery, etc., 
Furniture and upholstery, . 
Kitchen furnishings, . 
Wooden ware, buckets, pails, etc., 
Sundries, 

Heat, light and power : — 
Coal, 

Electricity, 
Oil, . 
Gasoline, 
Sundries, 



Repairs and improvements : — 

Bricks, 

Cement, lime and plaster, . 
Doors, sashes, etc., . . . . 
Electrical work and supplies, . 

Hardware, 

Lumber, 

Machinery, etc , 

Paints, oil, glass, etc., 

Plumbing, steam fitting and supplies, 
Roofing and materials. 
Mechanics and laborers (not on pay roll). 
Sundries, 



«10,889 17 $25,438 47 

114 43 
823 32 
569 58 
914 83 
999 57 
14,310 90 



f737 87 
1,641 50 
835 11 
841 30 
182 77 
135 21 
47 06 




$1,869 64 
124 88 
77 34 
366 02 
394 63 
369 33 
60 44 
92 58 



$6,819 40 
95 00 
229 42 
177 01 
273 31 



|5 00 
18 01 
40 87 
570 08 
376 04 
804 60 
174 02 
787 25 
,599 00 
68 18 
744 52 
300 68 



4,420 82 



3,344 86 



7,694 14 



5,488 25 



Amount carried forward. 



160,597 44 



ieo6.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



19 



Amount brought forward. 



Farm, stable and grounds : — 

Blacksmith and supplies, $197 69 

Carriages, wagons and repairs, .... 365 60 

Fertilizers, vines, seeds, etc., .... 980 38 

Hay, grain, etc., - . . 2,6U 53 

Harness and repairs, 136 99 

Horses 250 00 

Other live stock, 35 00 

Tools, farm machines, etc., .... 367 40 

Sundries, . 169 18 



Miscellaneous: — 

Books, periodicals, etc , f41 22 

Chapel services and entertainments, . . . 182 49 

Freight, expressage and transportation, . . 603 52 

Funeral expenses, 69 00 

Gratuities, 2 00 

Hose, etc., 7 70 

Labor (not on pay roll), ... . 850 

Medicines and hospital supplies, . . . 380 78 

Postage, 104 29 

Printing and printing supplies, . . . . 114 81 

Printing annual report, 106 28 

Return of runaways, 88 94 

Soap and laundry supplies, .... 382 27 

Stationery and office supplies, .... 271 75 

Travel and expenses (officials), . . . 650 59 

Telephone and telegraph, 343 98 

Tobacco, 454 10 

Sundries 374 62 



Total, 

Expenditures for all other purposes : — 

Building for 100 patients and furnishing same, 
Acts 1903, chapter 414, flO 00 

Administration building and furnishing same, 
Acts 1903, chapter 414, 6 00 

Sewage disposal, water supply, etc., Acts 1903, 
chapter 414, 146 75 

Buildings and furnishings for 100 patients, 
with barn and water supply. Acts 1904, chap- 
ter 323, 34,722 98 

Mechanics' building, ice house, etc., Acts 1904, 
chapter 323, . . • . . . . . 2,801 86 



$60,597 44 



5,116 77 



4,186 84 



869,901 05 



Amounts carried forward, .... |37,687 59 



$69,901 05 



20 



STATE COLONY FOE THE IXSAXE. [Dec. 



Amounts brought forward, .... $37,687 59 f69,901 05 



Buildings for 100 patients, with barn and water 

supply, Acts 1905, chapter 444, . . . 33,686 33 

Furnishing group for 100 patients. Resolves 

19C5, chapter 88, 872 43 

Two boilers, dynamo, etc.. Resolves 1905, chap- 
ter 88, 7,999 99 

Finishing attic of administration building, Re- 
solves 19C 6, chapter 75 2,697 18 

Alteration and repair of 3 buildings. Resolves 

1906, chapter 75, 1,079 93 



Total, 84,023 45 



Total expenditures, f 153,924 50 

Balance of receipts and maintenance appropria- 
tions with State Treasurer, Xov, S"", 19(6, . |4,147 68 
Amount of unexpended balance of maintenance 

appropriation, Dec. 31, 1905, .... 2,990 65 
Income reverted to treasury, .... 1,883 98 

9,C22 21 



fl62,946 71 

Resources and Liabilities. 



Besources. 

Applicable to maintenance : — 

Balance of receipts and maintenance appropria- 
tions with State Treasurer, .... f 4,147 58 

Bills due from farm, stable and grounds, . . 15 00 

Total, ?4,162 58 

Not applicable to maintenance : — 

Total unexpended special appropriations, .... 37,530 05 



Total resources, ■ . . $41,692 63 



Liabilities. 

None. 

JOSEPH B. HOWLAXD, 

Treasurer. 

Examined and found correct: A. B. BRYANT. 

Approved upon the report of A. B. Bryant, Esq., an accountant employed by us 
to audit the books. 

HERBERT B. HOWARD, 
EDMUND A. WHITMAN, 

Finance Committee of Trustees* 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



1 


E-^S 1 13 2 S_ III 


g 

1 
S 


1 


$149,962 12 
32,998 6() 
10,991 76 
69,930 97 

ii,ir>i 00 

66,977 98 

33,686 33 

7,999 99 
872 43 

2,697 18 
1,079 93 


! 

u 


.1 


$6 00 
146 76 
10 00 

2,801 86 

84,722 98 

83,686 33 

7,999 99 
872 43 

2,697 18 
1,079 93 




1 

1 


1150,000 00 
33,000 00 
17,000 00 
()0,000 00 

16,660 00 

66,000 00 

61,000 00 

8,000 00 
6,000 00 

4,760 00 

8,000 00 
1,600 00 


g 


i 

1 


Acts 1902, (!h. 434 
Acts 1903, ch. 414 
Acts 1903, ch. 414 
Acts 1903, ch. 414 

Acts 1904, ch. 323 

Acts 1904, ch. 323 
J Acts 1906, ch. 444, ) 
} Sect. 2. S 
l\,(!S. i,f\),), CM. on 
Res. 1906, ch. 88 

Res. 1906, ch. 76 
Res. 1906, ch. 76 
Res, 1906, ch. 76 




(General construction, 

Sewage disposal, water supply, (;t(\,. 

Building for 100 patients, 

Mechanics' building, ice house and road-re()airing 

Buildings for 100 i)atients, with barn and water 

iiuildings for 100 patients, with barn and water 
suppl^V, 

Two boilers, dynamo and (^ngin(% ... 

Furnishing group for 100 ])atients, .... 

Finishing and furnishing attic of administration 
building, 

Alteration and repair of three buildings, . 

Fire apparatus, 



STATISTICAL TABLE 



[FoKM rmmacmaMD bt Stats Bqabd or Issajott.] 
ff 



1. — General Statistics of the Year. 





Insane. 




Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


i rtLiGuLSs 111 uoioijy wcL. 1, iyuu, • • 


152 


101 


253 


Admitted within the year, 


160 


32 


192 


Viz : by transfer, .... 


152 


32 


184 


ilUlli > ISlL, . • . • 


5 


- 


5 


ilUIil coudUc, .... 


3 


_ 


3 


AVhole number of cases within the year, 


312 


133 


445 


Dismissed within the year, 


34 


8 


42 


V JZf. . i^iai^Ucii g cii . — 


7 


- 


7 


as recovered at time of leav- 


2 


- 


2 


ing hospital, 
as capable of self-support, 








3 


- 


3 


d,& iiiipiovtju, • • • • 


1 


- 


1 


as noL iiiipioxuu, . . . 


1 




1 










Died, 


6 




6 


Transferred .... 


12 


8 


20 


Escaped, 


6 




6 


On visit Oct. 1, 1906, . 


3 




3 


Patients remaining Sept. 30, 1906, . 


278 


125 


403 


Viz. : supported as State patients, 


274 


123 


397 


as private patients, . 








as reimbursing pa- 


4 


2 


6 


tients. 








Number of different persons within the 


306 


133 


439 


year. 








Number of different persons admitted, 


154 


32 


186 


Number of different persons recovered, 


2 




2 


Daily average number of patients. 


207.277 


116.375 


323.652 


Viz : State patients, .... 


202.207 


114.295 


316.502 


private patients. 








reimbursing patients, 


5.07 


2.08 


7.15 



1 Includes o patients absent on visit at beginning of year, and nominally admitted for 
discharge. 



26 STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. [Dec. 



2. — Received on First and Subsequent Admissions. 





Cases aduitted. 


NUMBEK OF ADMISSION. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 




149 


32 


181 


Second (to the colony), . 


3 




3 


Third (to the colony) , . . . . 








Total cases, 


162 


32 


184 


Total persons, 


151 


32 


183 



3. — Ages of Insane at First Attack and Death. 





Pebsons died. 


AGES. 


AT 


FIRST ATTACK. 


AT TIME OF DEATH. 




Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Congenital, 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.5 vpflrs and Ipss 


- 












From 15 to 20 years, 














20 to 25 years, 


1 




1 








25 to 30 years, 


1 




1 








30 to 35 years, 














35 to 40 years, 


1 




1 


1 




1 


40 to 50 years, 


1 




1 


2 




2 


50 to 60 years, 


1 




1 


1 




1 


60 to 70 years, 


1 




1 


2 




2 


70 to 80 years, 














Over 80 years, 














Total, .... 


6 




6 


6 




6 


Unknown, .... 














Not insane, .... 














Total persons. 


6 




6 


6 




6 


Mean known ages in years, 


43.166 




43.166 


52 




52 



906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo 



70 



« 2 



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o 



STATE COLOXY FOR THE INSANE. 



[Dec. 



J a H 






ri eo » 




II 1 1 1 1 1 1 j 1 1 1 


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a 
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1906.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMEXT — Xo. 70. 



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NUMHKR OF ADMISSION. 


First, 

Second, 

Third 

Fourth, 

Total cases. 

Total persons first admitted 
to any hospital when ad- 

llllllt^il LW IIIOLILULIUII llUIII 

which transferred, . 



30 



STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. 



[Dec. 



CO 

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5 
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1 1 1 i 1 


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Senile 
Dementia. 




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1 1 1 1 1 


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Brain J>isbase. 




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CAUSES OF DEATH. 


Carcinoma of intestine, 
General tuberculosis. 
Mitral insuflSciency, . 
Organic brain disease. 
Pulmonary tuberculosis, . 
Totals, 



1906. J 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



31 





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32 



>TATE COLOXY FOE THE IXSANE. 



Dee. Iit06. 




Public Document 



No. 70 



FIFTH ANNUAL EFFORT 

OF 

THE TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE 

AT GARDNER, MASS., 

FOR THE 

Year ex ding November 3 0, 1907. 




BOSTON: 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Squaee. 
1908. 



Approved by 
The State Board of Publication. 



C O T E X T S . 



PAGE 

Report of Trustees, 7 

Report of Superintendent, . 9 

Report of Treasurer, 20 

Statistical Tables, .25 



OFFICERS OF THE STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. 



TRUSTEES. 



EDMUND A. WHITMAN, Chairman, Cambridge. 

Mrs. AMIE H. GOES, Secretary Worcester. 

Mrs. ALICE M. SPRING Fitchburg. 

WILLIAM H. BAKER, M.D., Lynn. 

GEORGE N. HARWOOD Barre. 

WILBUR F. WHITNEY, Ashburnham. 

JOHN G. BLAKE, M.D Boston. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 
CHARLES E. THOMPSON, M.D., . . . Superintendent and Treasurer. 
GEORGE A. PEIRCE, M.D., .... Assistant Superintendent. 
WILLIAM F. FARMER, M.D.,. . . . Assistant Physician. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Goverjior and the Honorable Council. 

We have the honor to present the fifth annual report of the 
trustees of the State Colony for the Insane. 

During the past year we have suffered the loss of Dr. H. B. 
Howard, who resigned to accept an appointment to the State 
Board of Insanity. Dr. Howard left the State Board to be- 
come a member of the original board of this colony, and 
served as its chairman for four years. These were the con- 
structive years, and the institution owes its present condition 
very largely to his untiring exertions and careful oversight. 

We have also lost our first superintendent, Dr. Joseph B. 
Howland, who left us to accept a position at the Massachusetts 
General Hospital. He came to the colony when it was as a 
wilderness and left it an institution which is a credit to the 
Commonwealth. The trustees have elected to fill his place 
Dr. Charles E. Thompson, who had served us as first assistant. 

The new group referred to in our last report as adapted 
to the care of 100 patients has been finished and is now occu- 
pied. The O'Connor house has also been completed and is 
occupied. 

The colony at the present time has a capacity of about 500 
patients, which, in our judgment, should not be increased 
until we have had sufficient time to develop our present 
patients on the lines upon which the colony was founded. 

We have experienced serious difficulty in obtaining sufficient 
and suitable attendants. This difficulty is not peculiar to the 
State Colony and is felt by other institutions, but we have 
suffered to a greater degree than others because of our isolated 
situation and our inability to furnish diversion to our em- 
ployees during their unemployed hours. 



8 STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. [Dec. 



We need further quarters for employees of a more home-like 
character than we now have, and accommodations for married 
couples. As a beginning in this direction we are now asking 
for a small appropriation for a building to be devoted entirely 
to the housing of officers. 

The water supply for the colony has been a serious problem 
during the past year. During the drought of last August our 
springs ran dry and the supply stored in the pond was entirely 
exhausted, so that we faced an absolute water famine. In this 
crisis we purchased about a mile of two-inch pipe and laid it 
over the ground from the driven wells near the Westminster 
group, where there seems to be an unfailing source of suppl3\ 
In the opinion of the expert whom we have employed this 
is the onh^ supply upon which the colony can rely. The last 
season has demonstrated that the surface drainage cannot be 
relied upon, and, in addition, with the growth of the colony 
the danofer of contamination is increasino^. The new Gardner 
group is so near the sources of supply of our pond that it will 
not be long safe to continue its use. We therefore renew our 
recommendations of the last two years, that the Legislature be 
asked to appropriate mone}^ to extend the permanent water 
supply. 

We ask also for an appropriation to build a number of small 
farm buildings, such as hen houses, cow sheds, piggeries, etc. 
These can be constructed to a considerable extent by our labor. 

We have now two assistant physicians and a third is neces- 
sary in the growing work of the colony. The quarters assigned 
to our executive officers are entirely inadequate. We therefore 
renew our recommendations of the last two years, that, as in 
other institutions, the superintendent be lodged in a separate 
house. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDMUND A. AYHITMAN. 
AMIE H. GOES. 
ALIGE M. SPRING. 
WILLIAM H. BAKER. 
GEORGE N. HARWOOD. 
WILBUR F. WHITNEY. 
JOHN G. BLAKE. 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



9 



SUPEEINTETsTDEIS^T'S KEPORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Colony for the Insane. 

I present herewith the fifth annual report of the operations 
of the State Colony for the Insane. 

The financial tables are for the year ending Nov. 30, 1907, 
and the statistical tables for the year ending Sept. 30, 1907. 

Patients. 

On Oct. 1, 1906, there were 278 male and 125 female 
patients, — a total of 403. During the year 110 have been 
admitted, of which 75 were men and 35 were women. Fifty 
men and 25 women have been admitted from the Northampton 
State Hospital ; 25 men and 10 women from the Westborough 
Insane Hospital. Thirteen men and 1 woman have been dis- 
charged, — 5 as capable of self-support, 4 as improved and 5 
not improved. Nineteen men and 7 women, a total of 26, 
have been transferred, — 15 men and 7 women to the Worces- 
ter Insane Asylum, 2 men to the State Farm at Bridge- 
water, 1 man to the Foxborough State Hospital and 1 man 
to the Westborough Insane Hospital. Fourteen men and 1 
woman, — a total of 15, have died, and 6 men were out on 
visit or elopement Oct. 1, 1907, making 311 men and 151 
women, — a total of 462 patients at the colony Oct. 1, 1907. 
The whole number cared for during the year was 363 men 
and 160 women, — a total of 523. The general health of the 
patients has been good. 

Industrial. 

As in previous years, the men have been occupied largely 
in out-of-door work upon the farm and grounds. The women 
have been occupied out of doors as much as possible in picking 
berries, peas, etc., and have taken at least daily walks in 



10 STATE COLONY FOR THE IXSAXE. [Dec. 



suitable weather, but most of the work done by them has been 
in our domestic departments and sewing rooms. 

At the Gardner cottages the experiment of having 50 men 
and 50 women in each of two buildings, with a congregate 
dining room in a third building, has proved a success. The 
men work upon the farm, and the women not only do the 
sewing and mending for all in this group, but do extra mending 
for other cottages not occupied by women. They are now 
about to make the men's outside clothing, which will be sent 
to them, cut out, from the sewing room at the receiving group. 

Mat and rug making has been introduced at the women's 
receiving ward, and nearly a hundred have been completed at 
this time. A loom has been installed in the men's receivinof 
ward as a nucleus for a weaving department. 

While a marked improvement in the mental condition of 
many of the patients can be seen, it is now a question of pro- 
viding suitable winter occupations, so that whatever progress 
is made through the summer months will not be lost. To 
provide such occupation it will be necessary to have additional 
and more suitable room than we now have at our disposal. 
By building a cottage for some of our married employees it 
will not only give us the room we need in our women's build- 
ing for this but will materially aid us in retaining desirable 
employees. 

Faem, Gardex a:s'd Grounds. 

Numerous walks and roadways have been built with ap- 
proximately 5,000 cubic yards of stone taken from fields Avhich 
have been cleared. About 1,000 tons of stone have been 
crushed by our stone crusher. A considerable amount of 
grading has been done. Thirteen acres of land have been 
reclaimed for planting and 15 acres cleared for pasture land. 

Oxen were introduced this summer and have already proved 
their worth; three pairs have been purchased. A flock of 
sheep has also been added. 

Xew Buildings. 
The Gardner cottages, with a barn for same, have been com- 
pleted and were opened in ]May. 

The Valley farm annex (O'Connor place) has been com- 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



11 



pleted and has been occupied by 18 patients since August. 
To accommodate the patients occupying this, an addition to 
the dining room at the Yalley farm has been built. 

A new feed barn and stable at the Belcher cottage has been 
built. 

A building of field stone for our fire apparatus is nearing 
completion. 

A 700-ton ice house is being built and will be ready for use 
this winter. 

Kepairs and Improvements. 

A barn at the Valley farm cottages has been taken down, 
moved and rebuilt. 

The Gates house has been altered and repaired and is now 
ready for plastering. 

A forge and some machinery has been installed in the 
mechanics' building. 

Painting of the exteriors of five and the interiors of four 
buildings has been done. 

A hen coop 12 by 60 feet has been added to the AYest- 
minster group. 

A good share of this work has been done by patients. 

General. 

Protestant services have been held biweekly. We have not 
yet been able to secure Catholic services. 

I take this opportunity to thank those who have contributed 
papers, books and magazines for our library. These have 
been much appreciated by all. 

Dances have been held every two weeks during the winter. 
Entertainments have been provided at intervals. During the 
summer baseball has been the sport most enjoyed by the 
patients. 

Staff. 

Dr. George A. Peirce, formerly assistant physician at the 
State Hospital at Tewksbury, was appointed assistant super- 
intendent in May. Dr. William F. Farmer, for the past year 
second assistant physician, has been granted a leave of absence 
from November 1, because of illness. 



12 STATE COLOXY FOR THE INSANE. [Dec. 



Eecom^eexdatioxs. 

A water supply is our most pressing need. The only supply 
for our Diain group, Belcher cottage and barn, is from a pond 
supplied bj surface water, which is not suitable for drinking. 
• All our drinking water for 340 people is carried in buckets 
from a spring at some distance from the buildings. Both the 
pond and spring failed entu'ely during the past summer, and it 
became necessary to expend $900 to tide us over the dry period 
only. In case of fire we would have been helpless. 

Xear our office, and surrounded by land owned by the 
colony, is an eight-acre farm, with a house and barn, which 
can now be purchased to advantage, and I recommend that 
this be done. 

A cottage for married employees should be erected, which 
work would be done by our own labor. 

An appropriation with which to build a number of small 
buildings should be requested. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

CHAS. E. THOMPSON, 

Siqjerinteiident. 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



13 



PKODUCTS OF FAKM. 



Apples, barrels. 


196 


Mangel wurzels, bushels. 


. 105 


Beans, shelled, bushels, 


18 


Maple syrup, gallons, . 


23 


Beans, string, . . . . 


50 


Milk, quarts, . 


93,775 


Beef, pounds, ... J 


J,477.5 


Mutton, pounds. 


303 


Beet greens, bushels. 


34 


Onions, bushels, 


3 


Beets, bushels. 


100 


Parsnips, bushels, . 


73 


Blackberries, quarts, ^ 


280 


Fears, bushels, 


. 5.25 


Blueberries, quarts. 


972 


Pease, bushels. 


40 


Cabbage, heads. 


9,898 


Pork, pounds. 


. 4,794 


Calves sold, . . . . 


10 


Posts (fence). 


150 


Carrots, bushels, . 


178.5 


Potatoes, bushels, . 


. 335 


Cider, gallons, 


800 


Poultry, pounds, 


. 691.5 


Corn, sweet, bushels, 


139.5 


Radishes, dozen bunches, 


. 104 


Corn, ensilago, tons. 


136 


Raspberries, quarts, 


1 QQ 


V-^Ut/UlIlUt!l », UUXcs, • 


7 


Spinach, bushels, . 


Q 




4 


Squash, summer, dozen, 




^6o^» uozen, . . . . 


1,686 


Squash, winter, pounds, 


1 010 


ordpes, oLisiieis, . . • 


10 


Tallow, pounds. 


119 




80 


Tomatoes, pounds, . 


790 


T-Tm? nnPfiHnw tons 


10 


Turnips, Swedish, bushels. 


627 


xiiues soiti, pounuo, . 


520 . 


Turnips, white, bushels. 


. Oil/ 


Ice, tons, . . . . 


350 


Veal, pounds. 


. 745.5 


Lettuce, heads. 


1,600 


Wood, hard, cords, . 


90 


Lumber, feet, .... 


5,000 


Wood, soft, cords, . 


15 




Live Stock. 




Horses, 


12 


Shoats, .... 


37 


Cows, 


49 


Hens, .... 


. 183 


Heifers, 


10 


Pullets, .... 


. 183 


Calves, 


19 


Roosters, 


86 


Bulls, 


3 


Oxen, .... 


6 


Steers, 


9 


Sheep, .... 


12 


Hogs 


27 







14 



STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. 



[Dec. 



KITCHElSr DEPAKTMEISTT. 



Manufactured. 

Soap, pounds, 4,163 



Preserves, etc. 



Blueberries, quarts. 


. 316 


Piccalilli, gallons, . 


15 


Blackberries, quarts, 


95 


Sweet pickles, gallons, . 


47 


Grapes, quarts, 


56 


Tomatoes, quarts, . 


5 


Grape jelly, quarts, 


. 103 


Chili sauce, gallons. 


4 


Pears, quarts, . 


57 


Pickles, barrels. 


h 


Raspberries, quarts, 


54 







SEWmG ROOM. 



Manufactured. 



Aprons (carpenters'), . 


6 


Laundry bags, 


84 


Aprons (men's), , 


78 


Napkins, 


. 264 


Aprons (operating). 


8 


Nightgowns, . 


75 


Aprons (rubber), . 


1 


Overalls, 


60 


Aprons (women's). 


. 122 


Pillow cases, . 


551 


Bandages, 


14 


Sheets, . . . 


. 848 


Bibs, .... 


48 


Shirts (outing), 


. 321 


Bureau covers, 


96 


Sleigh cover, . 


1 


Chemises, 


75 


Suspenders, . 


74 


Corset covers, 


7 


Tablecloths, . 


32 


Curtains, 


. 171 


Table covers (small) , . 


3 


Drawers, 


78 


Towels, .... 


. 2,150 


Dresses, .... 


. 170 


Underdrawers, 


1 


Dust cloths, . 


24 






Holders, .... 


24 


Total, . . 


. 5,548 


Jumpers, 


60 






Articles mended, . 






. 10,628 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



15 



WOEK DONE BY PATIEKTS ON WAED. 



Bandages, . . . .700 

Dresses, 26 

Elastics, 100 

Lace (crocheted) , yards, . 10 
Poultices, . . . .500 

Rugs, 90 

Shirtwaists, .... 2 

Skirts, 98 

Towels, 235 

Tags on blankets, . . . 360 



Tags on aprons, ... 24 

Pillow cases, .... 84 

Sheets, 36 

Chemises, .... 24 

Bibs 36 

Drawers, .... 24 

Shirts (outing), . . . 12 

Aprons (women^s), . . 54 



Total, . . . .2,415 



AKTICLES MENDED ON WARD. 



Aprons, 40 

Blankets, .... 25 

Corset covers, ... 50 

Drawers, .... 3,900 

Dresses, 3,120 

Nightdresses, .... 600 

Pillow cases, .... 50 



Sheets, 200 

Skirts, 5,200 

Stockings, .... 5,720 
Undervests, . . . .3,120 



Total 22,025 



16 STATE COLOXY FOR THE IXSAXE. [Dec. 



CARPENTER. 



Large boxes, . 


10 


Medicine closets, . 


1 


Horse sled, body, . 


1 


Leaves for tables, . 


4 


Bulletin boards, 


5 


Covers for pails. 


12 


Clothes closets, 


27 


Towel hangers. 


3 


Key closets, . 


1 


Slats for drier. 


12 


Spreaders, 


1 


Weirs, .... 


1 


Tool cabinets, 


1 


Paddles for kitchen, 


2 


Boxes for batteries. 


■i 


Ox yokes, 


2 


Bread boxes, . 


/? 

D 


Stanchions for barn. 


1 o 

18 


Knife boxes, . 


9 


Drags, .... 


6 


Toilet paper boxes. 


22 


Seed rollers, . 


1 


Frames for hooking rugs, 


2 


Barn doors, . 


1 


Dining tables, 


11 


Trap doors, . 


2 


Kitchen tables, 


3 


Screen doors, . 


2 


Foot rests. 


1 


House doors and frames, 


6 


Swabs, .... 


24 


Settees, .... 


7 


Wooden horses, 


12 


Wagon poles, . 


4 


Crates, .... 


14 


Eveners, 


1 


Lapboards, 


2 


Shingles laid, . 


. 52 M. 


Clothes reel, . 


1 







COBBLEK. 



Heels, leather, pairs. 
Heels, rubber, pairs, 
Patches, . 



175 Taps, pairs, .... 90 
20 Taps and heels, . . .570 
610 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCU:HENT — No. 70. 17 
LIST OF SALARIES. 



Superintendent (per year), ' . . f 2,500 00 

Assistant superintendent (per year), 1,500 00 

Assistant physician (per year), 700 00 

Clerk (per month), 30 00 

Stenographer (per month), 20 00 

Supervisors (five male) (per month), .... f38 00 to 55 00 

Supervisor (one female) (per month), 33 00 

Kitchen men (three) (per month), . . . . . $25 00 to 45 00 

Cooks (four) (per month), 20 00 to 30 00 

Kitchen assistant (one) (per month), 18 00 

Dining-room man (one) (per month), 30 00 

Dining-room matron (one) (per month), 20 00 

Waitress (one) (per month), 18 00 

Housekeepers (seven) (per month), . . '. . . f 18 00 to 25 00 

Seamstress (one) (per month), 28 00 

Engineer (one) (per month), 83 33 

Assistant engineers (six) (per month), .... f45 00 to 50 00 

Firemen (two) (per month), 35 00 

Laundry man (one) (per month), 30 00 

Laundress (one) (per month), 28 00 

Attendants (twenty-eight male) (per month), . . . f 23 00 to 33 00 
Attendants (thirteen female) (per month), . . . 18 00 to 25 00 

Herdsman (non-resident) (per month), 55 00 

Storekeeper (per month), 35 00 



18 



STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. [Dec. 



YALUATIO^^. 



Real Estate. 

Land, 1,581.51 acres,' $43,483 00 

Filter beds 13,953 00 

Administration building, ... .... 37,750 00 

Belcher cottage, 8,000 00 

Belcher cottage barns, 14,500 00 

Domestic building, 45,416 00 

Gardner cottages, 65,702 00 

Men's receiving ward, 47,949 00 

Mechanics' building, 4,581 39 

Old buildings, 1,000 00 

Power house and fixtures, 32,553 99 

Pump houses and fixtures, 1,847 00 

Storehouse, . . . * 6,168 00 

Temporary office and stable, . 1,400 00 

Valley farm cottage and barn, 3,76148 

Valley farm annex 5,002 00 

Westminster cottages, . . 50,177 62 

Women's receiving ward, 57,740 00 

New buildings under construction, ... . . . 6,000 00 

Total real estate, $135,984 48 

Personal Estate. 

Provisions and groceries, $2,353 98 

Ready-made clothing, 3,107 76 

Dry goods 1,217 85 

Personal property of State in superintendent's department, . 11,957 37 



1 Includes water supply, etc. 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMEXT — No. 70. 19 

Beds and bedding in inmates' department, .... f 10,030 13 

Other furnishings in inmates' department, .... 4,703 92 

Property and fuel in power plant, 4,541 81 

Machinery, mechanical fixtures and supplies, . . , 6,760 17 

Live stock on farm, 6,066 00 

Produce of the farm on hand, 4,051 80 

Carriages, agricultural implements and supplies, . . . 5,490 22 

Drugs and medicines, 283 77 

Tobacco, 184 00 

Library 109 60 

Other supplies undistributed, 1,911 35 

Total personal estate, ?62,769 73 

Total real and personal estates, f 498,754 21 



20 



STATE COLOXY FOR THE IXSAXE. [Dec. 



TREASUREK'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Colony fo?' the Insane. 

I respectfully submit the following report of the finances of 
the colony from Dec. 1, 190G, to Dec. 1, 1907 : — 



Receipts. 

Applicable to maintenance : — 

Balance in State treasur}' on Dec. 1, 1906, . . $4,147 58 

Appropriation for maintenance, . . . 85,000 00 

Receipts from individuals for support of pa- 
tients, reimbursements, 617 67 

Sales : — 

Clothing and clothing material, ... 34 59 

Farm, stable and grounds, .... 90 51 

Miscellaneous, 15 

All other sources, 88 02 

From State Treasurer on account of special 

appropriations, 35,469 86 

Total receipts $125,448 38 

Payments. 

Expenditures for maintenance : — 

Salaries, wages and labor, $28,629 \h 

Food : — 

Butter and butterine f 1,828 38 

Beans, 319 07 

Crackers, . 191 75 

Cereals, 696 78 

Cheese, 88 53 

Eggs, 227 32 

Ffour, 2,062 37 

Fish 1,300 13 

Fruit 355 71 

Meats, 4,761 90 

Molasses, 204 06 

Sugar, 1,021 30 



Amounts carried forward, .... 113,057 30 $28,629 17 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



21 



Amounts brought forward. 

Tea, coffee and cocoa, . 
Vegetables, .... 
Sundries, .... 



Clothing and clothing material : — 
Boots, shoes and rubbers, . 

Clothing, 

Dry goods for clothing, and small wares, 
Fm'nishing goods, .... 

Hats and caps, 

Leather and shoe findings, . 
Sundries 



Furnishings : — 
Beds, bedding, table linen, etc., . 
Brushes, brooms, etc , . 
Carpets, rugs, etc.. 
Crockery, glassware, cutlery, etc., 
Furniture and upholstery, . 
Kitchen furnishings, . 
Wooden ware, buckets, etc., 
Sundries, 



Heat, light and power : — 

Coal, 

Wood, 

Electricity, .... 
Gasolene, .... 

Oil, 

Sundries, .... 



Repairs and improvements : — 

Brick, 

Cement, lime and plaster, . 

Doors, sashes, etc., .... 

Electrical work and supplies. 

Hardware, 

Lumber, 

Machinery, etc., 

Paints, oil, glass, etc , . 

Plumbing, steam fitting and supplies. 

Roofing and materials. 

Mechanics and laborers (not on pay roll). 

Sundries, 



$13,057 30 128,629 17 

525 77 
992 56 
1,374 65 
15,950 28 



$1,027 59 
2,036 86 
949 90 
603 01 
221 71 
132 53 
62 47 



$2,410 41 
178 11 
178 62 
581 93 
466 46 
377 86 
50 49 
21 92 



19,175 20 
5 00 
413 39 
121 04 
156 66 
132 28 



40 00 
147 60 

47 10 
459 47 
656 16 
820 52 
132 32 
790 73 
1,784 28 

12 22 
706 42 
308 52 



5,034 07 



4,266 80 



10,003 57 



5,805 34 



Amount carried forward^ 



$69,688 23 



22 STATE COLOXY FOR THE INSANE. [Dec. 

Amount brought forward, . $69,688 23 

Farm, stable and grounds : — 

Blacksmith and supplies, $173 54 

Carriages, wagons and repairs, .... 683 91 

Fertilizers, vines, seeds, etc., .... 1,032 30 

Haj, grain, etc., 3,424 78 

Harnesses and repairs, 69 10 

Cows, 167 00 

Other live stock, 404 00 

Labor (not on pay roll), 21 00 

Tools, farm machines, etc., . . ■ . . . 631 71 

Sundries, ........ 229 19 

6,836 53 

Miscellaneous : — 

Books, periodicals, etc., . . . . . $45 99 

Chapel services and entertainments, . , . 185 91 

Freight, expressage and transportation, . . 713 24 

Funeral expenses, 10 00 

Gratuities, 93 

Hose, etc., 37 48 

Labor (not on pay roll) , 32 25 

Medicines and hospital supplies, . . . 438 83 

Medical attendance, nurses (extra), ... 57 45 

Manual training supplies, 49 50 

Postage 96 46 

Printing and printing supplies, .... 191 11 

Return of runaways, 69 73 

Soap and laundry supplies, .... 915 41 

Stationery and office supplies, .... 163 60 

Travel and expenses (officials), . . . . 439 09 

Telephone and telegraph, 357 35 

Tobacco 486 56 

Water . 54 31 

Sundries, 271 52 

4,606 72 



Total, $81,131 48 

Expenditures for all other purposes : — 

Ice house, mechanics' building, etc.. Acts 1904, 

chapter 323, $2,191 86 

Buildings for 100 patients, with barn and water 

supply. Acts 1904, chapter 444, . . 17,313 32 

Furnishing and supplying group for 100 pa- 
tients, Resolves 1905, chapter 88, . . . 3,828 92 

Error in bill, March, 1907, returned to Treasurer, 118 80 



Amounts carried forward, .... $23,452 90 $81,131 48 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMEXT — Xo. 70. 



23 



Amounts brought forward $23,452 90 181,131 18 

Furnishing attic of administration building, Re- 
solves 1906, chapter 75, 2,052 82 

Fire apparatus, Resolves 1906, chapter 75, . 1,499 34 

Alteration and repair of three buildings, Re- 
solves 1906, chapter 75, 4,082 69 

Stable, Resolves 1907, chapter 95, . . . 4,382 11 

Total 35,469 86 



Total expenditures, $116,601 34 

Balance of receipts and maintenance appropria- 
tions with State Treasurer, Nov. 30, 1907, . $4,699 46 
Amount of unexpended balance of maintenance 

appropriation, Dec. 31, 1906, .... 3,033 27 

Income reverted to treasury, .... 1,11431 

8,847 04 



$125,448 38 

Resources and Liabilities. 

Resources. 

Applicable to maintenance : — 
Balance receipts and maintenance appropriations with State 
Treasurer $4,699 46 



Total, 14,699 46 

Not applicable to maintenance : — 
Total unexpended special appropriations, 8,562 07 



Total resources, $13,261 53 



Liabililies. 

None. 

CHAS. E. THOMPSOX, 

Treasurer. 

Dec. 28, 1907. 

Examined and found correct. 

A. B. BRYANT. 

Approved upon the report of A. B. Bryant, Esq., an accountant employed by us 
to audit the books. 

EDMUND A. WHITMAN, 
W. F. WHITNEY, 

Finance Committee of Trustees. 



24 STATE COLONY FOR THE IXSANE. [Dec. 190' 



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STATISTICAL TABLES. 



[Form prescribed by State Board of Insanity.] 



I 



1. — General Statistics of the Year. 





Insane. 




Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


r^atients in colony uct. 1, lyuo, 




1 OK 
120 


/< AO 

40o 


Admitted within the year, 


85 


35 


120 


VIZ. . Dy Lidiiaier, • • . . 


75 


85 


110 


from visit,^ ..... 


Q 
O 




Q 
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from escape,' .... 


rt 
i 




7 


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L^JoLIllsot/tl WlLUlll Hit; Veal, . • . 


52 


9 


61 


V 1^, , j^iov^iiai y CLi . 








RS recovered at time of leav- 








ing liospital, 


13 


1 


14 


~ 




~ 


as improved, .... 


5 


— 


5 


as not improved, 


3 


1 


4 


as not msane, .... 


c 



~ 


5 


L/ieci, ...... 






~ 


JL I ttnoiei I cU, .... 


14 


I 


15 


XjoCd-peU, ..... 




7 


2d 


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3 




3 


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Viz. : supported as State patients, 


311 


151 


462 


as private patients, . 


308 


149 


457 


as reimbursing pa- 








tients, 








Number of different persons within the 




* 




year, 


3 


2 


5 


Number of different persons admitted, . 


355 


160 


515 


Number of different persons dismissed, . 


77 


35 


112 


Number of different persons recovered, . 


44 


9 


53 


Number of different persons discharged 








as capable of self support, . 


• 5 




5 


Daily average of patients. 


287.191 


128.916 


416.107 


Viz. : State patients, .... 


284.341 


127.076 


411.417 


private patients. 








reimbursing patients. 


2.85 


1,84 


4.69 



1 Includes 3 patients absent on visit at beginning of year, and nominally admitted for 
discharge. 

2 Includes 5 patients absent on escape at beginning of year and nominally admitted for 
discharge. 



28 STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. [Dec. 



2. — Received on First and Subsequent Admissions. 



NUMBER OF ADMISSION. 


Cases admitted. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


First (to the colony), .... 


74 


35 


109 


Second (to the colony), .... 


1 




1 


Third (to the colony), . . . . 








Total cases, 


75 


35 


110 


Total persons, 


75 


35 


110 



3. — Ages of Insane at First Attack and Death. 





Persons died. 


AGES. 


AT 


FIRST ATTACK. 


AT TIME OF DEATH. 




Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Congenital, .... 


2 




9 








15 years and less, . . 




- 




- 


- 


- 


From 15 to 20 years, 


2 




2 








20 to 25 years, 


1 




1 








25 to 30 years. 


1 




1 


3 




3 


• 

30 to 35 years, 








1 




1 


35 to 40 years. 


1 


1 


2 


1 




1 


40 to 50 years. 


2 




2 


3 




3 


50 to 60 years, 


4 




4 


2 


1 


3 


60 to 70 years, 








3 




3 


70 to 80 years, . 


1 




1 


1 




1 


Over 80 years. 














Total 


14 


1 


15 


14 


1 


15 


Unknown, .... 














Not insane, .... 














Total persons, 


14 


1 


15 


14 


1 


15 


Mean known age in years, . 


36.284 


35 


35.642 


46.857 


54 


50.428 



1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — Xo. 70. 



29 



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30 STATE COLONY 



FOR 



THE IXSAXE. [Dec. 





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1907.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



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1907.] 



PUBLIC DOCmiEXT — Xo. 70. 



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4 



Public Document 



No. 70 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF 

THE TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE 

AT GARDNER, MASS./ 

FOR THE 

Year ending November 30, 1908. 



BOSTON: 

WEIGHT & POTTER FEINTING CO., STATE PRINTEES, 
18 Post OrncE Squake. 
1909. 



Al'PROVED BY 

The State Board of Publication. 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Report of Trustees, 7 

Report of Superixtexdent, . . . . . . .10 

Tables of Farm Products, 15 

Tables of Manufactures, 17 

Report of Treasurer, 24 

Statistical Tables, 31 



OFFICERS OF THE STATE COLONY FOE THE INSANE. 



TRUSTEES. 
EDMUND A. WHITMAN, Chairmari, 
Mes. AMIE H. goes, Secretary, 
Mks. ALICE M. SPRING, . 
WILLIAM H. BAKER, M.D., 
GEORGE N. HARWOOD, . 
WILBUR F. WHITNEY. 
JOHN G. BLAKE, M.D , 



Cambridge. 

Worcester. 

FiTCHBURG. 

Lykn. 

Barre. 

ashbur>-ham. 

BosToy. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 

CHARLES E. THOMPSON, M.D Superintendent and Treasurer. 

THOMAS LITTLEWOOD, M.D., . . . Assistant Superintendent. 
HARRIS C. BARROWS. M.D Assistant Physician. 



®l)c Commontocoltl) of illassacliueetts. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

We have the honor to present the sixth annual report of the 
trustees of the State Colony for the Insane. 

During the past year we have undertaken no construction 
for the housing of patients, feeling that, for the present, we 
should pursue the policy, announced in our last annual report, 
of devoting ourselves to the industrial development of what 
patients we have before adding to our numbers. We have 
built the farm buildings for which appropriations were made by 
the Legislature this year. 

We are very much gratified at the progress made by the super- 
intendent, Dr. Charles E. Thompson, in developing the capacity 
of the patients for useful work. Not only has a large number 
of patients been induced to engage in useful labor, but the 
variety of occupations has been much increased, and additional 
room is greatly needed for workshops in which patients may be 
employed during the winter months. We therefore ask for an 
appropriation to build and equip two workshops, — one for 
men and the other for women. Already the labor of our pa- 
tients on the farm has produced a perceptible effect on the cost 
of maintenance, and the progress in the manufacture of useful 
articles gives strong hope that our patients may soon begin to 
contribute very materially to reducing the cost to the State of 
their support. We need cellars for the storage of farm products 
and an ice box in our storehouse for storage of perishable 
supplies. 



8 



STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. [Dec. 



We have expended the appropriation made this year for the 
installation of a water supply. The contracts were let after 
competitive bidding, but, as we feared, the appropriation was 
not sufficient to complete the work. The amount then asked 
for did not, however, include the installation of adequate fire 
protection, and we feel that a storage tank should be erected on 
our hill of sufficient capacit}' and head to provide ample water 
for any fire. 

The cottage for married employees, for which money was 
appropriated, is in process of construction, but that building 
will not much relieve the congestion in the administration build- 
ing, or provide suitable and proper quarters for the superin- 
tendent. At present he occupies three rooms, and is necessarily 
obliged to share the second floor with his assistant physicians 
and some of the other officers. In any case there is no privacy 
for him and his family except in the three rooms he now 
occupies. In no other institution for the insane in the State 
is the superintendent so cramped for room. In six of our other 
institutions the State has erected and furnished a commodious 
house for his occupation, and in the other six he is provided 
with seven rooms, usually occupying a whole floor. 

The neio^hborino^ States of Rhode Island, Connecticut and 
New York not only pay far higher salaries to superintendents 
of insane asylums than does Massachusetts, but in most cases 
furnish them with comfortable houses, and they are always will- 
ing to call competent men from Massachusetts. 

Where, therefore, as in the case of the experiment in this 
colony, our success will be followed with particular interest by 
our neighbors, it is wise for the State to secure the loyalty of 
a successful superintendent by generous treatment. A change 
in management is necessarily expensive to the State, as the 
progress of the colony must halt while a new superintendent 
learns his duties. It is not as though there were other men 
now doing this work who could step in and carry it on. It 
must not be forgotten that we are attempting to work out a 
new plan for the care of the insane, and that we now have few 
precedents to guide us, and if the experiment succeeds, our 
superintendent must become an authority on this subject. 



1908.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT— No. 70. 



9 



We desire to express our confidence in our superintendent 
and renew our recommendation that he be lodged in a separate 
house. 

Kespectfully submitted, 

EDMUXD A. TTHITMAX. 
GEORGE X. HARWOOD. 
WILBUR F. WHITNEY. 
XmB H. COES. 
ALICE M. SPRING. 
WILLIAM H. BAIvER. M.D. 
JOHN G. BLAKE, M.D. 



10 



STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. [Dec. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Colony for the Insane. 

Herewith I respectfully present the sixth annual report of the 
State Colony for the Insane. 

The financial statements submitted are for the year ending 
Dec. 1, 1908, while the statistical tables relating to patients are 
for the year ending Sept. 30, 1908. 

Patients. 

The statistical tables show that there were 311 men and 151 
women — a total of 462 patients — at the colony on Oo-t. 1, 
1907. During the year 114 have been admitted, of whom 75 
were men and 39 women. Fifty men have been admitted, from 
the Worcester Insane Hospital ; 24 men and 24 women from the 
Taunton Insane Hospital ; 1 man and 15 women from the West- 
borough Insane Hospital. Twenty-seven men and 13 women 
have been dismissed during the year, of whom 1 man and 1 
woman were discharged as improved ; 12 men and 4 women 
have died. Fourteen have been transferred to other hospitals, 
as follows : 1 man to the Worcester Insane Hospital ; 6 men to 
the Medfield Insane Asylum ; 6 women to the Worcester Insane 
Asylum ; 1 man to the Boston Insane Hospital. Six men and 1 
woman were out on visit or elopement Oct. 1, 1908, so that 
the number of patients at the Colony Oct. 1, 1908, is, males, 
365 ; females, 177 ; total, 542. The daily average number of 
patients for the year has been 514, an increase of 98 over last 
year. 

Industrial. 

Working along the lines of the intent of the colony, consid- 
erable progress has been made in developing our patients for 
useful work. Our method has been to provide suitable occupa- 
tion for each individual, which in many cases has necessarily 



1908.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — Xo. 70. 



11 



been very simple. Consequently, a large part of the work 
done by them and by those teaching them cannot appear in any 
table which we might compile, bat the aim has been to lay the 
foundation for future usefulness. Already we have seen very 
encouraging results of this training in the more simple, 
demented patients, and many of them are doing really useful 
wopk. 

By the tables following you will see that they are making 
good progress toward raising what we consume and making 
what we otherwise would have to buy. 

That 80 per cent, of our patients are at present regularly 
engaged in useful occupation must mean that they are ma- 
terially aiding in their own support. 

This has been most apparent in increased farm production 
and work done in our industrial departments. Consultation of 
the tables submitted must be made, however, only by bearing 
in mind that practically all the work shown therein has l^een 
done by patients, as otherwise they mean but little. 

The increased production during the past year has brought 
about a lower cost for maintenance to the State than during any 
previous year, with greater promise in this respect for the 
future. But what is of even greater gratitication and impor- 
tance is the fact that with suitable occupation our patients are 
much happier, and show improvement in their mental, physical 
and moral conditions. 

The degree of benefit derived cannot be determined by the 
number of discharges each year, for the majority of our patients 
will never fully recover : but those who will of necessity require 
supervision will, unquestionably, be much benefited by a proper 
coui-se of training : while a certain number can be allowed to 
return to their homes as useful citizens, thus relievinsr the Com- 
monwealth of a portion of its burden. 

A practical woman farmer was engaged during the summer 
directing in out-of-door work women who from choice desired 
that kind of occupation. This proved a success, both fi-om the 
standpoint of benefit to the patient and return for theii* labor, 
they receiving a large portion of their garden produce on their 
own table. 

One of the original farmhouses, situated one and one-half 



12 STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. [Dec. 



miles from the receiving group, was used during the summer 
months as a camp for 15 selected men, they living there, carrv- 
ing on a garden and clearing rough land, while enjoying greater 
liberty than is possible in our other colonies. 

"Within doors, in the limited space at our disposal in our day 
rooms, we have manufactured our clothing, hats, mats and rugs. 
Here we have done all of our mending ; developed, as far as pos- 
sible, basket making, weaving, embroidery, fancy work, etc., 
and the ability the patients have shown is very gratifying. AVe 
must further such occupations as these, and should carry on other 
useful industries, which we cannot do at the present time owing 
to lack of room, and would never be able to do in our wards. 
It is therefore imperative that we have a small industrial build- 
ing for each sex, where we can carry on varied industries in a 
systematic manner. A certain number who would not take 
kindly to an industrial building would still be emploj^ed in the 
ward. 

Farm, Garden axd Grounds. 

Clearing fields and pastures has been carried on as fast as 
possible. During the year 2 43^^ acres of land have been par- 
tially or wholly reclaimed, and the stone taken from this used 
in constructing roadways and walks. 

One thousand tons of stone have been crushed in our stone 
crusher; 21,460 cubic yards of excavating and 8,590 cubic 
yards of filling and grading have been done about the buildings. 

A beginning has been made this year toward replacing our old 
orchards ; 675 young apple and pear trees, together with 150 
shade trees, have been set out, while 180 of our present trees 
have been grafted. 

In May our entire herd of 100 cattle was examined by the State 
Cattle Bureau, with the unusual and gratifying result that only 
one ox, and this purchased but a short time before, was con- 
demned. 

Construction and Betterments. 

No new buildings have been erected for patients. 
An employees' cottage has been built and will be read}' for 
occupancy by the first of the year. 

Two additions to barns are nearing completion. 
Two hen coops 12 feet by 60 feet have been erected. 



1908.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



13 



The farm mentioned in our last report has been purchased, 
the house is being remodeled and will make a very satisfactory 
employees' dwelling. 

The water system requested last year has been installed and 
the pump is now being connected. A standpipe is necessary 
?o that a proper reservoir may be had for domestic and tire pur- 
poses, and our present small tank used for suppWing our boilers, 
our new supply from driven wells being unsuited for these. 

The original temporary office building has been moved to a 
location across the street, remodeled throughout, a kitchen 
extension added, and is now occupied by our chief engineer. 

The original temporary stable has been moved to a location 
near our mechanics* building and has been converted into a 
paint shop. 

In our mechanics' building several iron and woodworking 
machines have been installed. 

A vacuum pump has been installed in our power hou>e, and 
five buildings have been connected with and are now being 
heated by the exhaust steam from the engines. 

Gexeral. 

Protestant services have been held biweekly, as heretofore. 
I desire to take this opportunity to thank the Rev. Robert S. 
Cheney of Ciardner for conducting our religious services and 
for the interest he has taken in our |3atients. Both he and the 
Rev. J. F. McDermott have faithtiilly visited our sick whenever 
called upon by us, and wUile some are unable to do so, many 
have fully appreciated their services. 

Dances have been held biweekly for the patients during the 
winter, and at intervals during the summer months, which 
form of entertainment has been much enjoyed by them. At 
intervals outside talent has been employed to provide enter- 
tainment. 

A recreation room has been fitted up in the basement of the 
administration building for the use of our employees and is 
always open to them. Here we have had monthly socials, with 
light refreshments, and this has done much towards bringing 
about a better relationship among them, and helps to relieve 
the monotony which necessarily obtains in an institution isolated 
as is ours. 



14 



STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. [Dec. 



Staff. 

Dr. AVilliam F. Farmer, on leave of absence at the time of my 
last report, has been unable to resume his duties. Dr. Harris 
C. Barrows, of the State Hospital, Augusta, Me., was selected 
to fill this vacancy and began his duties April 1. 

Dr. George A. Peirce, assistant superintendent, resigned 
August 30, to accept the position of assistant superintendent 
at the State Hospital at Tewksbury. The vacancy thus caused 
has been filled b}^ Dr. Thomas Littlewood from the State Hos- 
pital at Concord, N. H., who assumed his duties October 16. 

Requirements. 

An appropriation sufficient to erect a water tower and con- 
nect some of our buildings with our new supply is necessarj^. 

To centralize our supplies, as well as to enable us to buy to 
better advantage, a refrigerating room should be installed in 
our present storehouse. 

A storage cellar at each of our farm groups is essential, as at 
the present time we are storing vegetables under buildings used 
for patients. This is not only highly objectionable, but vege- 
tables will not keep. 

Two small parcels of land adjacent to and partially surrounded 
by colony land can be purchased for a small sum, and such 
purchase should be made. 

Two small workshops should be erected. 

In closing this report I desire to say that I fully appreciate 
the orenerous treatment and encourao^ement which I have 
received from each member of your Board at all times, and this 
has made my duties light. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES E. THOMPSON, 

Superintendent. 



1908.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



15 



PRODUCTS OF FARM. 



Apples, barrels, 66, at $3, $198 00 

Beans, lima, bushels, 3|, at $0.50, 1 88 

Beans, shell, bushels, 28i, at $1.25, 29 38 

Beans, string, bushels, 52|, at $1.25, 65 94 

Beef, pounds, 4,658, at $0.07, 326 06 

Beets, bushels, 102|, at $0.50, 51 38 

Beet greens, bushels, 8^, at $0.35, 2 98 

Blackberries, quarts, 1,485, at $0.08, 118 80 

Blueberries, quarts, 1,073, at $0.10 107 30 

Cabbage, heads, 9,467, at $5 per hundred heads, . . . 473 35 

Carrots, bushels, 179^, at $0.50, 89 75 

Cherries, quarts, 10, at $0.10, 1 00 

Corn, green, bushels, 310|, at $0.75, 227 06 

Cucumbers, boxes, 87|, at $1.50, ..... 131 00 

Cucumbers, pickling, pecks, 59, at $0.40, . . . . 23 60 

Eggs, dozen, l,611i, at $0.35, 564 03 

Ensilage, tons, 265, at $5, 1,325 00 

Fowl, pounds, 522^, at $0.15, 78 34 

Grapes, pounds, 640, at $0.03, 19 20 

Hay, English, tons, 40, at $16, 640 00 

Hay, meadow, tons, 10, at $10, 100 00 

Hides and skins sold, ........ 46 74 

Ice, tons, 870, at $3, 2,610 00 

Lettuce, boxes, 611, at $0.60, 305 50 

Lumber, feet, 14,122, at $30 per M, 423 66 

Mangel- wurz els, bushels, 300, at $0.25, .... 77 50 

Maple syrup, gallons, 33, at $1.15, 37 95 

Milk, quarts, 97,539, at $0.05, 4,876 95 

Millet, tons. If, at $12, 21 00 

Manure, cords, 205, at $6, 1,230 00 

Manure, hen, barrels, 45, at $1.00, 45 00 

Onions, bushels, 46, at $0.85, 39 10 

Parsnips, bushels, 70, at $0.75, 52 50 

Pears, bushels, 9, at $1.75, ....... 15 75 

Peas, green, bushels, 58^, at $1, 58 50 

Pork, pounds, 11,138, at $0.08, 891 04 

Poles, telephone, 27, at $4, 108 00 



16 STATE COLONY FOR THE 



INSANE 



[Dec. 



Posts, fence, 300, at $0.20, $60 00 

Potatoes, bushels, 1,316, at $0.80, 1,052 80 

Pumpkins, pounds, 2,828, at $0.03, 84 84 

Radishes, dozen bunches, 495, at $0.40, .... 198 00 

Raspberries, quarts, 209, at $0.10, 20 90 

Rhubarb, pounds, 25, at $0.02, 50 

Squash, winter, barrels, 82, at $1.50, . . . . . 123 00 

Squash, summer, barrels, 23|, at $1, ..... 23 75 

Spinach, bushels, 15 1, at $0.40, 6 20 

Stakes, fence, 500, at $0.10, 50 00 

Tomatoes, ripe, bushels, 66^, at $0.75, .... 49 69 

Tomatoes, green, bushels, 12, at $0.50, .... 6 00 

Turnips, white egg, barrels, 59, at $1, . . . . 59 00 

Veal, pounds, 1,213^, at $0.11, . . . . . . 133 49 

Wood, cords, 185, at $4.50, 832 50 

Wool, pounds, 105, at $0.25, 26 25 



Total, $18,392 66 

Live Stock. 

Horses, 12, $2,550 00 

Cows, 53, at $45, 2,385 00 

Heifers, 16, at $25, 400 00 

Heifer, 1, 30 00 

Steers, 4, at $25 100 00 

Steers, 5, at $40, 200 00 

Steers, 2, at $50, 100 00 

Calves, 18, at $15, 270 00 

Bulls, 3, 185 00 

Calf, 1, 10 00 

Oxen, 9, . 710 00 

Sheep, 12, at $9, 108 00 

Ram, 1, 30 00 

Lambs, 2, at $5, 10 00 

Hogs, 18, at $18, ......... 252 00 

Shotes, 20, at $8, 160 00 

Pigs, 15, at $2.50, . 37 50 

Hens, 187, at $0.75, 140 25 

Pullets, 154, at $0.50, . . 77 00 

Roosters, 57, at $0.50, 28 50 



Total, 



$7,783 25 



1908.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



17 



KITCHEN DEPARTMENT. 



Manufactured. 

Hard soap, pounds, 235 

JSoft soap, pounds, ......... 4,844 



Preserves, Pickles, etc. 



Apples, canned, quarts. 


6 


Pears, quarts. 


40 


Apple jelly, quarts. 


55 


Piccalilli, gallons. 


42 


Blackberries, quarts, . 


529 


Pickles, chopped, gallons, . 


4 


Blackberry pickle, gallons, . 


4 


Pickles, salted, barrels. 


H 


Blueberries, quarts, 


478 


Pickles, sweet, gallons. 


46 


Cherries, quarts, . 


6 


Pickles, vinegar, gallons. 




Chili sauce, gallons. 


75 


Raspberries, quarts. 


■ 98 


Grape jam, quarts, 


87 


Sauerkraut, barrels. 


2 


Grape jelly, quarts, 


23-1 


Tomatoes, canned, quarts, . 


131 


Ketchup, quarts, . 


12 







INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT. 



Manufactured. 



Aprons, carpenters'. 


12 


Baskets, reed and raffia, 


. 13 


Aprons, cobblers'. 


4 


Bed spreads hemmed, . 


11 


Aprons, dispensary, 


. 24 


Bibs, .... 


. 102 


Aprons, kitchen, . 


2 


Bureau covers. 


9 


Aprons, laundry, 


9 


Burial robes. 


8 


Aprons, men's, . 


. 208 


Chemises, . 


. 167 


Aprons, women's, 


. 43 


Coats, men's outside, . 


. 65 


Bags, candy. 


. 500 


Collars, 


2 


Bags, laundry, . 


. 106 


Corset covers. 


5 


Bandages, . 


. 569 


Curtains, scrim, . 


. 166 



18 



STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. [Dec. 



Di'tiwn. work : — 




i>l lj^llturt3b&(3S , 


xUO 




8 


vy V V/X cvxi o 9 • • • • 


£iO\J 


XctUltJ CUV CIS, • 




Pad's 








X lllv^VV CCLOCJo, • . • 


7^9 






T-^/^n 1 i"! r» o G 

X uuinL.t;&, . . . . 


9Qfi 


JrlliOW tops, aOldi, 


1 1 
1 1 


Rope braided for tampico 




JL/I tlWtJI O, 


loo 




1 R'X 1 
1631 




O U L 


Rugs : — 






R 
D 


X>X<lltie(.l, . . . , 


1 Q 


l-To /lT7'£iT»OI"n OTG • 

jriHntiKcruiiiclis . — 




TT 17" o /I 
XXOOKCU., . 


10/ 




. o^o 


OllC/t/to lldllXLlC/Ll, • . 


oOo 


TV LHUt/i-l Bj • • 


112 


>iVnT*i"G iTitiYi^G mTf"iTify* 

OlilX to , XLICIJ o ULlulll^, • 


OOO 






oxiiiLa, ixm-itji , . . 


9AO 


IVIpn '«! 


360 


SViift waists 


2 


TV UlXlt^ll Of • • 


91 


Slir»r»PTG PTTJpll pf Pfl IIDIVG 
OXippt/Xo CI ULyXlt/LCvl, p<l'll o. 




XlOlUcIb, llUIl, 




oixopcxiucx s, . . 


9Q& 




1 


XdUlC OlULilO Ht/XllXlltiU., 


Q 

V 


Jumpers, 


. 164: 


Towelling woven, yards. 


470 


Linen woven, yards, . 


• 6f 


Towels, 


1,794 


Mittens, pairs, 


. 67 


Towels, dish, 


246 


Napkins hemmed. 


. 359 


Trousers, 


123 


Neckties, four-in-hand, 


. 65 


Vests, 


39 




Mended. 




..xxpx V/llO , • • • 


. 32 


Pillow cases, 


514 


jjeci spredUft, . 


1 


Rags colored, pounds. 




Til Kg 

JjlUS, .... 


5 


Rugs bound. 




Blankets, . 


. 26 


Sheets, 


1 rk9 

lUZ 


Caps, .... 


1 


Shirts, 




V^LIu'LO, • • • 


. 521 


Skirts, 


1 mo 


v^urLaina, . 


9 


Stockings, . 


1 9 7f\0 

. 1/, < Di7 


Dresses, , 


. 1,648 


Stockings, tags sewed on, 




Drawers, . 


. 1,316 


Tablecloths, 


D 


Jumpers, 


. 58 


Trousers, 




Mittens, 


71 


Underdrawers, 


. 988 


Nightdresses, 


.2,018 


Undershirts, 


240 


Overalls, 


. 270 


Vests, 


152 


Overcoats, . 


. 20 







1908.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



19 



CARPENTER. 



Bench, carpenter"' , 


1 


Frames : — 




Bench, cobbler's, 


1 


Mat, 


2 


Benches, long, 


8 


Picture, . ... 


14 


Box, bread, 


1 


Horse sled body, . 


1 


Box for phonograph, . 


1 


Hospital stretcher. 


1 


Box, tool, .... 


1 


Ice runs. 


2 


Boxes, ice, .... 


2 


Ironing boards, . 


6 


Bread board. 


1 


Looms, 


2 


Builders' brackets. 


12 


Overhead bridge, 


1 


Bulletin boards, . 


2 


Ox sled, 


1 


Chair swings, . . . 


3 


Ox sling, 


1 


Chairs, large rocking, . 


4 


Ox yokes, . 


2 


Closet, linen. 


1 


Plant stand. 


1 


Closets in industrial depart- 




Saw horses. 


8 


ment, .... 


2 


Screen door, 


1 


Derrick, .... 


1 


Screens, window. 


. 150 


Flag pole, 65 feet. 


1 


Settees, 


3 


Flower tubs. 


72 


Sleeve boards. 


3 


Foundations for pump and 




Skid, .... 


1 


motor, .... 


1 


Stone boats. 


9 






Trestles, rug, 


6 



COBBLER. 



Taps, . 

Taps and heels, 
Heels, 



105 
1,383 
100 



Heels, rubber, pairs. 
Patches, 



25 
483 



20 STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. [Dec. 



BLACKSMITH AND MACHINIST. 



Adz axes sharpened, . 


18 


Picks resteeled, . 


13 


Axles set, pairs, . 


3 


Pickaxes, sharpened, . 


247 


Bolts made. 


101 


Pipe hangers made, 


14 


Brackets made, . 


61 


Ploughs repaired, 


5 


Crowbars sharpened, . 


27 


Riveting hammer made. 


1 


Crowbars resteeled. 


12 


Sleighs repaired. 


3 


Derrick ironed, . 


1 


Sleigh reshod. 


1 


Drag chains repaired, . 


42 


Stone chisels made, 


25 


Flag pole ironed, 


1 


Stone chisels sharpened, 


27 


Hand cart reironed. 


1 


Stone drags repaired, . 


3 


Harrows repaired. 


4 


Stone hammers repaired. 


4 


Hinges made. 


10 


Stone drills made, 


63 


Ice boxes soldered. 


4 


Stone drills sharpened. 


1.270 


Ice run ironed, 


1 


Tanks retinned. . 


3 


Mowing machines repau'ed, , 


4 


Tires set, . . . . 


18 


Overhead bridge, iron work, 


1 


TVagons repaired, 


14 


Ox chain made, feet, . 


16 


Washing machine repaired, . 


1 


Ox frame, iron work, . 


1 


Wheelbarrows repaired, 


2 


Oxen shod, shoes, pairs. 


79 


Whifla.etrees made, 


1 


Pans, etc.. soldered. 


56 


^Miiffletrees repaired. . 


6 



PAINTER. 



Blinds, pairs, 


76 


Glass reset, lights. 


117 


Buildings painted inside. 


5 


Picture frames, . 


20 


Buildings painted outside, . 


9 


Screens, window, 


158 


Carriages, .... 


6 


Screen doors. 


5 


Chairs, .... 


36 


Tables, 


24 


Flag pole, .... 


1 


Wagons, 


3 


Flower trellises, . 


77 


Water tower. 


1 


Flower tubs. 


62 







1908.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 70. 



21 



LIST OF SALARIES. 



Superintendent (per year), . 
Assistant superintendent (per year). 
Assistant physician (per year) , 
Clerk (per month) .... 
Stenographer (per month) . . 
Supervisors (five male) (per month) , 
Supervisor (one female) (per month). 
Kitchen men (three) (per month), 
Cooks (four) (per month) , , 
Dining-room man (one) (per month) . 
Dining-room matron (one) (per month) 
Waitresses (two) (per month), 
Housekeepers (seven) (per month), 
Seamstress (one) (per month). 
Engineer (one) (per month) , 
Assistant engineers (six) (per month) 
Firemen (four) (per month) , 
Laundjy man (one) (per month), 
Laundress (one) (per month). 
Attendants (thirty-three male) (per month) , 
Attendants (fourteen females) (per month). 
Storekeeper (per month), 
Carpenters (two) (per month), . 
Carpenters (two) (nonresident) (per day). 
Painter (nonresident) (per day) , . 
Herdsman (nonresident) (per month) , . 



$2,500 00 
1,200 00 
750 00 
40 00 
25 00 
840 00 to 55 00 
33 00 
$30 00 to 45 00 
$20 00^ to 35 00 
30 00 
20 00 
20 00 
$20 00 to 25 00 
28 00 
91 66 
$45 00 to 55 00 
35 00 
30 00 
25 00 
$23 00 to 30 00 
18 00 to 25 00 
40 00 

840 00 and 55 00 
2 25 and 2 75 
2 75 
55 00 



22 STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. [Dec. 



VALUATION. 



Real Estate. 

Land, 1,589.51 acres, $26,800 00 

Water supply, 20,641 42 

Drainage system, ........ 19,950 82 

Heat, light and power systems, . . . . . . 23,217 41 

Administration building, ....... 35,838 95 

Belcher cottage, 8,000 00 

Belcher barns, shed and hen house, . . . . . 14,674 77 

Domestic building, . . . . . . . . 45,416 00 

Employees cottage (under construction), .... 2,502 95 

Engineer's cottage, . . . . . . . . 2,865 46 

Gardner cottage, ........ 44,167 73 

Gardner barn, silo and hen house, ..... 4,395 90 

Hose house, 1,000 00 

Icehouse, 2,439 31 

Men's receiving ward, ....... 47,949 00 

Mechanics' building, 4,869 46 

Old buildings, 1,500 00 

Paint shop, . . . 709 50 

Power house, 13,875 71 

Pump houses (five), 255 00 

Seaver house and bam, ....... 885 85 

Storehouse, 6,218 00 

Valley Farm cottages and barn, . . . . . . 3,761 48 

Valley Farm annex, . . 5,002 00 

Westminster cottages, . . . . . . • 47,61219 

Westminster barn and hen house, ..... 3,822 87 

Women's receiving ward, ....... 57,740 00 



$446,111 78 

I 



1908. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 70. 



23 



department, 
in superintendent's depart 



Personal Estate. 

Provisions and groceries, 
Ready-made clothing, 
Dry goods : — 

For clothing. 

For bedding, etc.. 
Furnishings : — 

Beds and bedding in inmates 

Other furnishings, 

Personal property of State 
ment. 

All other property, 
Heat, light and power : — 

Fuel, .... 

All other property-. 
Repairs and improvements : — 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures. 

All other property. 
Farm, stable and grounds : — 

Live stock of the farm on hand, . 

Produce of the farm on hand, 

Carriages and agricultural implements 

Fire apparatus, .... 

All other propert3% 
Miscellaneous : — 

Drugs and medicines, . 

Tobacco, ..... 

Library, ..... 

Other supplies undistributed, 

Total personal estate, . 
Total real and personal estates. 



554,531 61 

4,749 11 

6.39 34 

473 02 

10,197 55 

4,298 22 

8,410 96 

5,551 76 

4,045 62 

3,035 02 

3,878 21 

4,528 67 

7,783 25 

5,677 86 

3,627 75 

804 56 

2,794 26 

283 33 

25 30 

213 25 

1,237 14 

S76,785 79 

$522,897 57 



24 



STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. [Dec. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Colony for the Insane. 

I respectfully submit the following report of the finances of 
the State Colony for the Insane from Dec. 1, 1907, to Nov. 
30, 1908: — 

Cash Account. 
Balance on hand Dec. 1, 1907 : — 
Advance money, cash, . . . . . $315 68 
Advance money, cash vouchers, . . . 684 32 



$1,000 00 



Receijyis. 

Board of inmates, reimbursements, . 
Sales : — 



60 



Food, . . . . . 


$9 


17 


Clothing and material, 


269 


42 


Furnishings, . . . . 




10 


Heat, light and power. 


23 


44 


Farm, stable and grounds. 


89 


33 


Miscellaneous, . . . . 


7 


60 



Miscellaneous receipts : — 

Interest on bank balances. 
All other sources, 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Special appropriations. 
Less returned. 

Maintenance appropriations : 
Balance of 1907, . 
On account of 1908, 
Less returned. 

Balance money (1908), 
Total receipts, . 



70 01 

28 54 



• ,214 61 
71 77 



399 06 



98 55 



,497 74 
25 10 



$19,142 84 
5,611 69 



90,472 64 
2,000 00 



1,203 21 



117,227 17 



$119,430 38 



1908.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— Xo. 70. 25 



Payments. 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts : — 

Hospital receipts ."$1,203 21 

Special appropriations, ..... 19,142 84 
Maintenance appropriations : — 

Xovember, 1907, schedule, appropriation 

1907, 6.611 69 

Eleven months' schedules, appropriation 

1908 90,472 64 

$117,430 38 

Balance on hand Nov. 30, 1908 : — 

% Cash vouchers, ...... $1,674 33 

Cash 325 67 

2,000 00 



Total payments, 1 19 , 430 38 

Appropriation for maintenance for the fiscal year 1908, . .$105,000 00 



Expenses for Fi 
Salaries, wages and labor, 

Food : — 
Butter, 
Butterine, . 
Beans, 

Bread and crackers. 
Cereals, 
Cheese. 
Eggs. 
Flour. 
Fish, 
Fruit, 
Meats, 

Molasses and syrup 
Sugar, 

Tea, coffee, cocoa. 
Vegetables, 
Sundries, . 



Clothing and clothing material : — 
Boots, shoes and rubbers, . 
Clothing, .... 
Drv goods for clothing, and small wares, 



CAL Year 1908. 



. $36,479 07 



81,986 20 
892 58 
390 15 
231 82 

1.007 40 
111 19 
479 85 

5.008 49 
1.536 21 

625 60 
5,157 34 

116 90 
1,430 71 

627 87 
1,487 04 
2,049 48 



81.812 05 
410 09 
2,n88 61 



23,138 83 



Amounts carried forward. 



$4,310 75 $59,617 90 



26 STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. [Dec. 



Amozmts brought forward, 

Furnishing goods, 
Hats and caps, . 
Leather and shoe findings, 
Sundries, . . ... 

Furnishings : — 
Beds, bedding, table linen, etc.. 
Brushes, brooms, etc.. 
Carpets, rugs, etc., . 
Crockery, glassware, cutlery, etc. 
Furniture and upholstery, . 
Kitchen furnishings, . 
Woodenware, buckets, etc.. 
Sundries, ..... 

Heat, light and power : — 
Coal, ..... 
Electricity, .... 
Gasoline, ..... 

Oil, 

Sundries, ..... 



Repairs and improvements : — 
Cement, lime, etc., .... 

Doors, sashes, etc., .... 

Electrical work and sup^Dlies, 
Hardware, ..... 

Lumber, ...... 

Machinery, etc., . 

Paints, oils, glass, etc., 

Plumbing, steam fitting and supplies. 

Roofing and materials. 

Mechanics and laborers (not on pay roll) , 

Moving building, .... 

Sundries, ...... 

Farm, stable and grounds : — 
Blacksmith and supplies, . 
Carriages, wagons and repairs, . 
Fertilizers, vines, seeds, etc.. 
Hay, grain, etc., .... 

Amounts carried forward, . 



$4,310 75 $59,617 90 

408 94 

65 63 

261 09 

17 91 



$833 38 
267 66 

81 80 
326 10 
627 98 
468 41 

30 32 
473 37 



$6,653 95 

124 95 

14 05 

150 43 

1,196 77 



$281 35 
9 00 
563 80 
780 05 

1,579 71 
238 13 

1,072 34 

1,495 53 
64 57 
100 18 
225 00 
278 81 



$352 93 
659 46 
1,802 06 
5,867 95 

$8,682 40 



5,064 32 



3,109 02 



i,140 15 



6,688 47 



,619 



1908.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 70. 



27 



Amounts brought forward, 

Harnesses and repairs, 
Oxen, .... 
Labor (not on pay roll), . 
Tools, farm machines, etc.. 
Sundries, .... 



Miscellaneous : — 
Books, periodicals, etc.. 
Chapel services and entertainments, 
Freight, expressing and transportation, 
Funeral expenses, 
Hose, etc.. 

Medicines and hospital supplies. 
Medical attendance (extra). 
Manual training supplies, . 
Postage, .... 
Printing and printing supplies, 
Printing annual report. 
Return of runaways, . 
Soap and laundry supplies. 
Stationery and office supplies, 
Travel and exiDcnses (officials), 
Telephone and telegraph, . 
Tobacco, .... 
Preliminary work on water supply. 
Sundries, ..... 



$8,682 40 ^S2,6W 86 

132 46 
470 00 
28 50 
747 33 
544 04 



$83 14 
263 22 
782 29 
25 00 
28 19 
464 63 
34 50 
301 42 
140 96 
159 56 
105 37 
195 26 
1,095 87 

382 18 
490 22 
413 72 
353 21 

383 36 
138 54 



10,604 73 



5,840 91 



Total expenses for maintenance, . 



$99,065 50 



Balance reverting to treasury of the Commonwealth, 



$5,934 50 



Special Appropriations. 

Balance on hand Dec. 1, 1907, $6,662 07 

Total of appropriations for 1908, 22,000 00 

$30,562 07 

Expended during the year (see statement annexed), . . 20,991 33 

$9,570 74 

Reverting to the treasury of the Commonwealth, . . 2 55 



Balance Nov. 30, 1908, 



$9,568 19 



28 



STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. [Dec. 



Resources and Liabilities. 

Resources. 

Cash on hand, $2,000 00 

Due from Commonwealth of Massachusetts, ac- 
count of November, 1908, schedule, . . 6,696 16 

— $8,596 16 

Liabilities. 

Schedule of November bills, $8,596 16 

CHAS. E. THOMPSON, 

Treasurer. 



Examined and found correct, as compared with the books in the office of the 
Auditor of the Commonwealth. 

WARREN A. MERRILL, 

Assistant Supervisor of Accounts. 



1908.] 



PUBLIC DOCUIVfENT— No. 70. 



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STATISTICAL TABLES. 



[Form prescribed by State Board of Insanity.] 



1. — General Statistics of the Year. 





Insane. 




Males. 

! 


Females. 


Totals. 


Patients in colony Oct. 1, 1907, 


1 

311 i 


151 


462 


Admitted within the year, 


81 


39 


120 


Viz. : by transfer, .... 


75 


39 


114 


from visit, 


3 


- 


3 


from escape, .... 


3 


- 


3 


Whole number of cases within the year, 


392 


190 


582' 


Dismissed within the year, 


27 


13 


40 


Viz. : Discharged : — 


2 


1 


3 


as recovered at time of leav- 








ing hospital, 
as capable of self-support, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


as improved, .... 


1 


1 


2 


as not improved, 


1 


- 


1 


as not insane, .... 


- 






Died. .... 


12 


4 


16 


Transferred, 


7 


7 


14 


Escaped, .... 


6 


1 


7 


On visit Oct 1, 1908, . 








Patients remaining Sept. 30, 1908, . 


od5 


177 


o4z 


Viz. : supported as State patients. 


362 


174 


536 


as private patients, . 








as reimbursing pa- 








tients, 


3 


3 


6 


Number of different persons within the 








year, . . . 


390 


190 


580 


Number of different persons admitted, . 


79 


39 


118 


Number of different persons dismissed, . 


25 


13 


38 


Number of different persons recovered, 








Number of different persons discharged 








as capable of self-support, 








Daily average of patients. 


345.312 


169.514 


514.856 


Viz : State patients, ... 


342.342 


167.194 


5 9.536 


private patients, .... 








reimbursing patients, . 


1 ^' 


2.32 


5.32 



1 Includes 2 patients absent on escape at the beginning of the year, and noininallv 
admitted tor discharge. 



34 STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. [Dec. 



2. — Received on First and Subsequent Admissions. 



NUMBER OF ADMISSION. 


Cases admitted. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


First (to the colony), .... 


74 


39 


113 


Second (to the colony), .... 


1 




1 


Total cases, 


75 


39 


114 


Total persons, 


75 


39 


114 



3. — Ages of Insane at First Attack and Death. 





Pebsons deed. 


AGES. 


AT 


FIBST ATTACK. 


AT TIME OF DEATH. 




Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Congenital, .... 




1 


3 


_ 


_ 





15 years and less, . 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


From lo to 20 years. 


- 












20 to 25 years. 


2 




2 








25 to 30 years. 


3 




3 


1 


1 


2 


30 to 35 years. 




2 


2 


4 


2 


6 


35 to 40 years, 




1 


I 








40 to 50 years. 


1 




1 


1 


1 


2 


50 to 60 years. 


2 




2 


4 




4 


60 to 70 years. 


2 




2 


2 




2 


70 to 80 years, 














Over 80 years, .... 














Total, .... 


12 


4 


16 


12 


4 


16 


Unknown, .... 














Not insane, .... 














Total persons, . 


12 


4 


16 


12 


4 


16 


Mean known age (in years), . 


35.8 


24 


29,9 


45.712 


35 


40.356 



1908.] 



PUBLIC DOCTOIENT— No. 70. 



, a 

30 z 

X < X 

" X r* 
.J s 2 
2 S H 




c« t-> 1 ei 1 — 1 


















■c" 




Jl L~ 1 1 1 ?1 1 




















1 DiBOHABOBD. 


NOT INSANE. 






1 1 1 
















NOT IMPROVED. 






■ 


,- 















- 




IMPROVED. 






" 












( APABLE OF 
SKl,I.-8UPPORT. 


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> 


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•S91BIII8J 


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Admitted. 


•9I«^OX 










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FORM OF DISKASK. 


l| . ..f.f ... 

II II . .1 . . . . . 

■=S . . 1 . ."3 • . ^ . = ... 

a 1 - c - i: > I o > c 
^ T • ■ S 2 2:-- 5 >> • = r § « 

1 1 



STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. 



Totals. 


•8i»^ox 


1 1 1 


05 TjH 
1-H rH 


•saiBnia^ 


O 1 1 1 


O (M 




^111 


^ <M 
1-t rH 


Died. 


•siB^ox 


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1— t 


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rH rH 




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rH 




\ \ \ 

rH 


rH rH 


Not Insane. 


•si«»ox 


1 1 1 1 


1 1 




1 1 t 1 


1 1 


•S91BH 


1 i 1 1 


1 1 


Not improved. 


•smox 


tH 1 1 1 


rH rH 




• 1 1 1 


1 1 




1 1 1 


rH rH 


Improved. 


•8lB:^ox 


CM 1 1 1 






T-( 1 1 t 


rH »-H 1 




T— 1 1 1 1 


rH rH 


Capable of 
Self-support. 


•s^ox 


1 1 1 1 


1 1 




1 1 1 1 


, , 






1 j 


Recovered. 




,1.1 


1 1 






1 1 


•891BK 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 


NUMBER OF ADMISSIONS. 


First, 

Third, 

Fourth, 

Total cases, 

Total persons first admitted 
to any hos})ital when ad- 
mitted to institution from 
which transferred, . 



1908.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



Toxic Insanity. 


•si«;ox 


1 1 1 1 1 '-H i-H 1 






1 1 1 1 1 1 [ 1 


1 




1 1 1 1 1 T-l tH 1 


<M 


Senile Dementia. 


•SIB^OX 


1 1 1 1 1 1 CM 1 






1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 


•881'BK 


1 1 1 1 1 1 <M 1 




Paranoia, 


■siB^ox 


1 1 1 1 1 tH 1 






1 1 1 1 1 1 1-4 1 


T-l 




r-< 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


T-l 


Congenital Mental 
Deficiency. 


•smox 


1 1 1 rH ^ 1 1 T-l 


CO 




1 1 1 1 tH 1 1 1 


T— 1 




1 1 1 i-H 1 1 1 i-H 


<M 


Dementia Precox. 


•8i«:^ox 


1 tH rH 1 iH i-t 1 CO 1 t> 




1 1 1 1 1 i-H 1 rH 




•881BPI 


1 tH ^ 1 T-l 1 « C<1 1 »0 


Aggregates. 


•S[B^0X 


T-l T-l T-l- T-( CN 


CD 

T-l 




1 1 1 1 ,-1 ,-1 ,-( 


Tt4 






tH 


CAUSES OF DEATH. 


Carcinoma of intestines, 
Carcinoma of stomach, . 
Fracture of base of skull, 
Gastro-enteritis, .... 
General miliary tuberculosis. 
Lobar pneumonia, .... 
Mitral insufficiency, 

Phthisis, 

Totals, 



38 



STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE. 



[Dec. 



I I I 



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^ H 

z s S 

o Q S 

EC 2 

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t 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 








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as Z, 
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H 



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1908 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



39 



a 5 
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o « 

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a ^ ^ s 

© o o o 



Public Document No. 70 

SEVENTH ANNUAL EEPORT 

OF 

THE TRUSTEES 

mm 

OF THE 

Gardner State Colony, 

FORMERLY STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE, 
AT GARDNER, MASS., 

FOR THE 

Yeae exdix.g lSrovE:>yBEB 30. 1009. 




BOSTON: 

WEIGHT k POTTEE PEIXTIXG CO., STATE PEINTEES, 
18 Post Office Square. 




OFFICERS OF THE GAEDNER STATE COLONY. 



TRUSTEES. 

EDMUND A. WHITMAN, Chairman, 
Mrs. AMIE H. GOES, Secretary, 
Mrs. ALICE M. SPRING, 
WILLIAM H. BAKER, M.D., 
GEORGE N. HARWOOD, 
WILBUR F. WHITNEY, 
JOHN G. BLAKE, M.D., 



Cambridge. 
Worcester. 

FiTCHBURG. 

Lynn. 
Barre. 
ashburnham. 
Boston. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 

CHARLES E. THOMPSON, M.D., . . Superintendent and Treasurer. 

THOMAS LITTLEWOOD, M.D., . . Assistant Superintendent. 

HARRIS C. BARROWS, M.D., . . . Assistant Physician. 



©1)0 CotnmcnrDealtl) of itTasBacljuBette. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

We have the honor to present the seventh annual report of 
the trustees of the Gardner State Colony. 

The trustees have, during the past year, seen no reason to 
change their announced policy of concentrating their efforts 
on the industrial development of their present patients, rather 
than building for the increasing numbers of the insane that 
must be cared for by the Commonwealth. We regard the 
Gardner colony as an experiment station, where the problems 
of the industrial aptitude of the insane can be worked out, and 
not as a storage plant for the overflow from older institutions. 
To this end we shall ask the Legislature, from time to time, 
for appropriations to extend and improve our facilities for the 
employment of patients in useful occupations, to increase the 
efficiency of our employees and to put the more promising 
patients under more homelike conditions than can be given in 
large buildings. We have, therefore, during the past year, 
fitted up a farmhouse to receive 12 women patients, under the 
charge of a married couple, and we ask for an appropriation 
to build a cottage for 28 patients. Our experience at the Yalley 
house and at the Belcher cottage seems to demonstrate that 
patients are not only far happier and more mentally acute 
when they are given surroundings approaching those of a home, 
but they are stimulated to productive labor that results in a 
material reduction in the cost of their support, — results not 
obtained to the same extent where patients are housed together 
in large numbers. 



8 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



The industrial activity of the patients depends, in large 
measure, upon the efficiency of the attendants. For such effi- 
ciency long terms of service from competent persons are essen- 
tial. To secure that, in our lonely situation, we must provide 
homelike social conditions, good pay and reasonable hours. 
These inducements will more than pay for themselves. The 
mental strain of directing the labor of insane patients is often 
far more exhausting than strenuous manual work. We there- 
fore ask for two more cottages for employees. As soon as our 
accommodations will permit, we expect to increase the number 
of our employees so as to allow a shortening of the present 
hours of service, which now average for our attendants about 
twelve out of the twenty-four. 

We have fitted up two bedrooms on the second floor of the 
administration building as a kitchen and dining room for the 
superintendent. A kitchen vdthout a chimney is an anomaly, 
and this arrangement is but a temporary and unsatisfactory 
makeshift. Nothing is more conducive to efficiency in an officer 
than comfortable quarters when his work of the day is over, 
and we hope that we may be permitted, at an early day, to build 
a suitable cottage for our superintendent. 

We take great pride in the progress of the colony during the 
past year, and desire to express to you our appreciation of and 
satisfaction with Dr. Charles E. Thompson, the superintendent. 
Under his guidance the colony is bound to become a credit 
to the Commonwealth as an object lesson to the country of the 
industrial capacity of the chronic insane. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDMUND A. WHITMAN, Chairman, 

GEORGE N. HARWOOD. 

ALICE MILLER SPRING. 

AMIE H. GOES. 

WILBUR F. WHITNEY. 

JOHN G. BLAKE. 

WILLIAM H. BAKER. 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



9 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Gardner State Colony. 

At this, the close of another year, I respectfully present for 
your consideration the seventh annual report of the Gardner 
State Colony. 

In matters relating to patients the year ends Sept. 30, 1909, 
while in those relating to finances the year ends Nov. 30, 1909. 

Patients. 

On Oct. 1, 1908, there were at the colony, men, 365 ; women, 
177, — a total of 542. During the year 69 men and 30 women 
have been admitted, as follows : 10 men and 10 women from the 
Worcester State Hospital; 10 men and 20 women from the 
Westborough State Hospital; 45 men from the Danvers State 
Hospital. Forty-six men and 13 women have been dismissed, 
as follows : 2 men as capable of self-support, 4 men as not 
improved. Twelve men and 4 women have died. Eighteen men 
and 7 women have been transferred to other hospitals, as fol- 
lows: 2 men to the Foxborough State Hospital; 7 men and 6 
women to the Worcester State Asylum ; 8 men and 1 woman to 
the State Infirmary ; 1 man to the Medfield State Asylum. Ten 
men have eloped and have not been returned. Two women are 
at present at home on visit,'' so that our actual census Oct. 
1, 1909, is, men, 388; women, 194, — a total of 582. The 
whole number cared for during the year was, men, 434 ; women, 
207, — a total of 641. The daily average number for the year 
ending September 30 has been 553, and for the financial year 
ending November 30, 560, an increase of 46 over last year. 

The general health of our patients has been good and there 
has been no outbreak of any contagious disease. 



10 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



Industries. 

The two industrial buildings granted us this year are in proc- 
ess of erection. That for the men is nearing completion, while 
the one for women is nearly closed in. We expect to occupy 
both soon after January 1. 

We are looking forward to these, knowing that a great deal 
of work can be done in them which we have heretofore been un- 
able to attempt on account of limited room. However, in our 
present workroom very satisfactory results have been obtained. 
Not many more patients than last year could be employed to 
advantage, but those employed have shown greater proficiency 
in their work, with a corresponding increase in production. 

The tables following show the amount, also the various kinds, 
of work done by patients, but special mention should be made 
of the fact that during the last year we have produced more 
than we have required for our own use of all clothing for both 
men and women; boots, shoes and slippers for men; handker- 
chiefs, neckties, mittens and hats; work, fancy and farm bas- 
kets ; fiber and braided mats, and toweling for patients' use. 

The amount of work done by patients surprises even those 
who work with them every day, and a large share of the credit 
is due to those who daily direct them in their work. 

When first our industrial work was started, ofiicers, with 
hardly an exception, were skeptical, and it was not infrequent 
for them to say, It is much easier to do the work myself than 
to keep telling them." This is now seldom heard, as they have 
gradually found that it lias paid to devote their time and energy 
to " showing and continually telling them," and those ofiicers 
who have been employed any length of time do not hesitate to 
express their surprise that so much has been and is being accom- 
plished by patients who, when received, were too demented to 
comprehend, much less to do. 

Where many are employed it must be expected that some 
will not be suited to the work, — are not by nature and habits 
fitted for it, — but it is indeed gratifying for me to be able to 
say that the past year has given less trouble in this respect. 
That the fact that there has been a large number of unemployed, 
as well as that we are past the pioneer stage of development, 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



11 



has had something to do with this there can be little question. 
But more satisfying than this is the fact that our officers are 
becoming more interested in the work, and are anxious to see 
greater things accomplished. 

Further, in regard to the large number of unemployed, our ex- 
perience has been that, although we have had very numerous ap- 
plications for work, the efficiency of the applicant has not been 
correspondingly increased. Our wish is to be able to retain 
permanently employees who are interested in and naturally 
adapted to the work we are carrying on. One method is to pro- 
vide homelike quarters for married employees. One cottage 
caring for eight has been erected this year, and two more are 
necessary and should be provided the coming summer. 

It seems also desirable that employees dealing directly with 
patients should not be compelled to work with them too many 
hours in succession, as they cannot maintain their active in- 
terest, and where active interest is lacking an employee is worse 
than useless. With this in view we should shorten their hours 
of duty as soon as provisions can be made for the increased 
number. 

Farm^ Gaedex axd Geoujvtds. 
Considerable attention has been paid each year to the de- 
velopment of our farm and the reclaiming of stony and over- 
grown land, with the result that a larger harvest has this year 
been reaped than ever before, furnishing for the first time all 
that could be used to advantage during the summer* and fall 
months, with a sufficient amount stored to carry us comfortably 
through the winter. The farm account this year has been 
itemized in the following tables by colonies so that a comparison 
may be made. 

The Goodale farm has again been carried on as a summer 
camp, with 15 patients. The Hillcrest camp (Sargent farm) 
was opened this summer for the first time with 15 patients, and 
both camps have proved very satisfactory. It would not be 
possible to live in the houses at either farm throughout the year, 
but during the summer their occupancy allows a freer, healthier 
manner of living to a selected class of quiet patients, while the 
work done on the farm gives valuable returns. 



12 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



Eleven thousand tons of stone liave been removed from fields, 
2,000 tons of which have been crushed to use in making walks, 
roadways and in building; 2,598 tons have been used in building 
roads and walks ; 3,247 tons have been used for filling. Three 
thousand three hundred and fifty-six cubic yards of rock and 
8,530 cubic yards of earth excavation have been done, together 
with 7,150 square yards of grading about buildings. 

Twenty-five and one-quarter acres of land have been re- 
claimed and cultivated by us for the first time this year, making 
104 acres imder cultivation, exclusive of grass land. While 
each year we are clearing considerable land, it will take several 
years to bring any of our land to a high state of cultivation. 

CoTs^STEUCTIOlSr AISTD BeTTEKMEI^^TS. 

The cottage for married employees, — Maple cottage, — in 
the course of erection at the time of the last report, was com- 
pleted early in the year and is occupied by four married couples. 
It has been found even more satisfactory than was expected. 

The small farmhouse (Seaver place) purchased last year 
has been remodeled and is now occupied by 12 women patients. 
This promises to be one of our most satisfactory colonies, because 
of the small number of patients. 

Fourteen acres of land, for which money was appropriated, 
have been purchased. 

The refrigerating room at the storehouse has been built and 
is now in use. 

Of the four vegetable storage cellars provided for, one has 
been finished, while two others are nearing completion. 

Because of the demand for steel, it has been, up to this time, 
impossible to obtain the material for our standpipe, but imme- 
diate delivery and erection early in January are now guaranteed. 

Our receiving group has been connected from the site of the 
standpipe with an 8-inch water main; the Belcher cottage and 
barn with a 6-inch main. This 6-inch line has been extended 
by our own labor from the Belcher cottage 800 feet to the Seaver 
farm, purchased last year. 

Considerable grading about our railroad station has been done. 

A system of arc lights has been installed about the receiving 
group, and a new branch exchange telephone service provided. 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 13 



A portable sawmill has been erected in connection with our 
stone crusher, and 45.000 feet of lumber, cut on the colony, 
has been sawed. 

The vacuum heating system has been extended to embrace 
the men's receiving ward and the administration building. 

Gexekal. 

As in previous years, a Protestant service has been held 
biweekly, conducted by the Rev. Pobert S. Cheney of Gardner. 
I wish here to acknowledge our appreciation of his efforts in 
behalf of our patients. I am also indebted to the Rev. J. F. 
^IcDermott of Gardner for visiting the sick when called, and 
ministrating to all those requiring his services. 

The usual dances have been held for patients throughout the 
year, and entertainments provided by outside and our own 
talent. 

A further effort has been made this year to provide for our 
employees when off duty by furnishing a smoking room adjacent 
to the recreation and pool room. 

In the recreation room socials and card parties, with re- 
freshments, have been held at intervals throughout the year. A 
literary club, meeting each week, has recently been formed 
among our young ladies. 

I take this opportunity to thank the following who have gener- 
ously supplied us with magazines and reading matter: Mrs. 
Amie H. Coes of Worcester, Mrs. George Sargent of AVest- 
minster. Rev. Robert S. Cheney, Mrs. G. B. Underwood, Dr. 
AYalter A. Jillson. Mrs. J. S. Ames, Mr. Henry Lawrence, 
Mr. Judson I. Wood, Mrs. C. S. :Marble, Rev. Lucy A. Milton, 
Mrs. Andrew Turner, Mrs. J. S. Stiles, Mr. C. S. Ruggles, 
Mrs. Charles T. Hawley, Miss Lillian Turner, Mr. A. L. Wilson, 
Mrs. E. F. Brainerd, Mrs. Charles A. Cowee, Mr. George R. 
Hoskins. and the Women's Christian Temperance Union all of 
Gardner. 

There have been no changes in our staff during the year. Dr. 
Thomas Littlewood and Dr. Harris C. Barrows continuing in 
their positions of first and second assistant physicians respec- 
tively. 



14 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



Requirements. 

We need two cottages- for married employees, to be erected 
by our own labor. 

An industrial cottage for 28 women should be provided, the 
erection of which will also be done by our own labor. 

An adjoining farm, which originally could not be bought, is 
now for sale, and should be purchased at once. 

Our coal trestle should be extended two car lengths, to pro- 
vide more room for storage and also to provide against accident 
from cars left on the incline. 

Our storehouse should be finished on the inside to better pro- 
vide for our supplies, it now consisting of large open rooms, 
without fittings. 

In closing, I desire to express my full appreciation of your 
support and confidence. 

Respectfully submitted. 



Gardner, Dec. 1, 1909. 



CHAS. E. THOMPSON, 

Superintendent. 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



15 



PRODUCTS OF FARM, BY COLONIES. 



Belcher Cottage. 



Annies barrels 21 at $3 


$63 00 


T^pj^rm c\w noiinHs fir? ^^t S!2 hiishpl 


2 36 


Rp^^rm ^t^iT^0' ViimVipl^ 124- f]f, Slfil 

J-J\_-Cl'lXOy OLXIXI^^ Pl/LIOXXv-AOj Ji^^y CLKJ J. y • • 


12 25 


Beef nounds 4 372+ at $0 08 


349 80 


fippfo bushels 14 at SO ."SO 


7 00 


RlpplrViprripc! nn^irtc; A-n f\i, SO 10 
j-'iiXL'XviL/d i icoj ^uidi to^ y <^yj iiyyjmxyjy 


4 50 


Blueberries, quarts, 17, at $0.10, 


1 70 


Cf^hlif^^p Dounds 1 7ofi ^it %*^0 ton 


17 56 


Calves sold 3 . 


4 00 


Carrots, bushels, 23, at $0.60, 


13 80 


Clover, green, tons, 6, at $18, 


108 00 


Corn ensilfio'e tons 180 at %n 


900 00 


Corn ffreen bushels 501 at %0 75 


38 13 


Cucumbers, boxes, 2^, at $2, 


5 00 


Eggs, dozen, 203}|, *at $0.35, 


71 37 


Fowl, pounds, 68^, at $0.15, 


10 28 


Hides sold, pounds, 905, 


64 36 


Lettuce, boxes, ^X2y $0.75, 


1 19 


Manure, cords, 186, at $6, 


1,116 00 


IVfannrp hen barrels 6 at .''^l 


6 00 


ATanle svrim P"allnns Q at .fSI 1.^ 


10 35 


Milk, quarts, 61,543, at $0.05, . . 


. 3,077 15 


Oats, green, tons, 20, at $5, 


100 00 


rarsnips, bushels, 1^, at $0./o, . 


1 12 


Peas, green, bushels, 2f, at $1, . 


2 75 


Pelts sold, 2, 


35 


Potatoes, bushels, 21 f, at $0.95, 


20 66 


Pumpkins, pounds, 850, at $0.03, 


25 50 


Radishes, dozen bunches, 22.2, at $0.25, 


5 55 


Raspberries, quarts, 21, at $0.10,. 


2 10 


Rhubarb, pounds, 9, at $0.02, 


18 


Rye grain, bushels, 17.856, at $0.90, . 


16 07 


Rye, green, tons, 6, at $5, . 


30 00 


Squash, summer, barrels, 9^, at $1, . 


9 12 


Tomatoes, bushels, 1^, at $0.75, . 


87 


Tomatoes, green, bushels, 5, at $0.50, . 


2 50 


Amount carried forward, 


. $6,100 57 



16 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. [Dec. 



A77iount brought forward, 



$6,100 57 



Turnips, Swedish, barrels, 9^, at $1.25, 
Veal, pounds, 969^, at $0.11, 
Wood, cords, 35, at $4.50, .... 
Wool, pounds, 80, at $0.25, 

Gardner Cottages. 

Apples, barrel, 1, . 
Barley, ton, 1, . 

Beans, dry, bushels, 5|, at $2.25, 
Beans, shell, bushels, 3^-, at $1.25, 
Beans, string, bushels, 11, at $1, 
Beef, pounds, 2,376, at $0.08, . 
Beets, bushels, 168^, at $0.50, . 
Blackberries, quarts, 72, at $0.10, 
Blueberries, quarts, 1,009, at $0.10, 
Cabbage, tons, 9.7375, at $20, . 
Carrots, bushels, 258^, at $0.60, . 
Corn fodder, tons, 1^, at $5, 
Corn, green, bushels, 105, at $0.75, 
Cucumbers, boxes, 5+, at $2, 
Eggs, dozen, 194,^2, at $0.35, 
Fowl, pounds, 20, at $0.15, 
Hides sold, pounds, 259, at $0.09, 
Lettuce, boxes, 22^, at $0.75, 
Manure, cords, 25, at $6, . 
Manure, hen, barrels, 8, at $1, 
Milk, quarts, 10,603, at $0.05, . 
Onions, bushels, 56f , at $0.85, . 
Parsnips, bushels, 40^, at $0.75, 
Peas, green, bushels, 13f, at $1, 
Pork, pounds, 1,424, at $0.08, . 
Potatoes, bushels, 525, at $0.95, 
Pumpkins, pounds, 16,019^, at $0.03, 
Radishes, dozen bunches, 149^, at $0.25, 
Scullions, bushels, 5, at $0.50, 
Squash, summer, barrels, 12f, at $1, 
Squash, winter, tons, 10.018, at $30, 
Tomatoes, bushels, 3|, at $0.75, 
Tomatoes, green, bushels, 10, at $0.50, 
Turnip greens, bushels, 92, at $0.35, 
Turnips, ruta baga, barrels, 160, at $1.25, 
Turnips, white egg, barrels, 128|, at $1.25, 
Wood, cords, 98, at $4.50, . 



11 87 

106 65 
157 50 
20 00 

$3 00 
5 00 
11 53 

4 37 
11 00 

190 08 
84 06 
7 20 
100 90 
194 75 
155 10 

7 50 
78 75 

11 00 
68 13 

3 00 
23 31 
16 75 
150 00 

8 00 
530 15 

48 24 
30 38 
13 75 
113 92 
498 75 
480 59 
37 38 
2 50 

12 75 
300 54 

2 35 

5 00 
32 20 

200 00 
161 00 
441 00 



$6,396 59 



4,043 93 



Amount carried forward, 



$10,440 52 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



17 



Garden at Receiving Group. 
Amount brought forward, ...... $10,440 52 

Beans, shell, bushels, 19, at $1.25, ... $23 75 

Beets, bushels, 31, at $0.50, .... 15 50 

Beet greens, bushels, 13, at $0.35, . . . 4 55 

Blackberries, quarts, 281, at $0.10, . . . 28 10 

Blueberries, quarts, 651, at $0.10, . . . 65 10 

Brussel sprouts, quarts, 160, at $0.11, . . 17 60 

Cabbage, tons, 5.895, at $20, ... 117 90 | 

Cabbage plants, 500, at $0.15 per 100,. . . 75 

Carrots, bushels, 18, at $0.60, .... 10 80 

Chard, bushels, 18^, at $0.35, .... 6 48 

Corn, broom, pounds, 160, at $10 ton, . . 80 

Corn, ensilage, tons, 3, at $5, . . . . 15 00 

Corn, green, bushels, 34i, at $0.75, . . . 25 69 

Cucumbers, boxes, 21^, at $2, . . . . 42 67 

Cucumbers, pickling, peck, 1, . . . . 40 

Endive, bushels, 40, at $0.35, .... 14 00 

Kale, bushels, 55, at $0.30, .... 16 50 

Kohlrabi, bushels, 5, at $0.35, . . . . 1 75 

I/ettuce, boxes, 47, at $0.75, . . . . 35 25 

Muskmelons, 15, at $0.03^, .... 50 

Parsley, bushels, 3, at $0.50, .... 1 50 

Peas, bushels, lOf, at $1, 10 75 

Pumpkins, pounds, 1,140, at $0.03, ... 34 20 

Radishes, dozen bunches, 35^, at $0.25, . . 8 88 

Squash, summer, barrels, 3, at $1, . . . 3 00 

Squash, winter, pounds, 1,100, at $30 ton, . . 16 50 

Tomato plants, dozen, 20, at $0.10, . . . 2 00 

Tomatoes, bushels, 4f , at $0.75, . . . 3 56 

Tomatoes, green, bushels, 15, at $0.50, . . 7 50 

Turnips, barrels, 22, at $1.25, .... 27 50 

558 48 



GooDALE Camp 
Apples, bushels, 3^, at $3 barrel. 
Beans, shell, bushel, |, at $1.25, 
Beans, string, bushels, 59, at $1, 
Beet greens, bushels, 10, at $0.35, 
Beefs, bushels, 6f , at $0.50, 
Blackberries, quarts, 5, at $0.10, 
Blueberries, quarts, 63, at $0.10, 
Cabbage, pounds, 5,775, at $20 ton. 

Amounts carried forward, 



$4 20 
63 
59 00 
3 50 
3 31 
50 
6 30 
57 75 



$135 19 $10,999 00 



18 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



A77iou7its brought forward, 

Carrots, bushels, 9|, at $0.60, 
Corn, ensilage, tons, 45, at So, . 
Corn, green, bushels, 4*, at SO. 75, 
Cucumbers, boxes, 6, at S2, . . . 
Dandehons, bushels, If, at S0.75, 
Lettuce, boxes, 21f, at $0.75, 
Manure, cord, 1, 
Milk, quarts, 1,521, at S0.05, 
Onions, bushel, |, at S0.85 bushel. 
Peas, green, bushels, 26^, at SI, 
Potatoes, bushels, 507f , at S0.95, 
Radishes, dozen bunches, 59^, at $0.25, 
Rhubarb, pounds, 40, at S0.02, . 
Squash, summer, barrels, 7.3, at SI, 
Squash, winter, pounds, 100, at $30 ton, 
Turnip greens, bushels, 34, at $0.35, . 
Turnips, Swedish, barrels, 12, at $1.25, 
Turnips, white egg, barrels, 6^, at $1.25, 

HiLLCREST Camp. 
Apples, barrels, 11^, at S3, ... 
Beans, shell, bushels, 6i, at $1.25, 
Beans, string, bushels, 16^, at $1, 
Beets, bushels, 5f , at $0.50, 
Blackberries, quarts, 25, at SO. 10, 
Blueberries, quarts, 56^, at SO. 10, 
Cabbage, tons, 1.547, at $20, 
Carrots, bushels, llf, at $0.60, . 
Cherries, quarts, 4^, at $0.10, 
Corn, green, bushels, 12, at $0.75, 
Cucumbers, boxes, 9^, at $2, 
Cucumbers, pickhng, pecks, 8, at $0.40, 
Dandehons, bushels, 2^, at $0.75, 
Grapes, pounds, 143f , at S0.03, . 
Lettuce, boxes, 2^, at $0.75, 
Milk, quarts, 1,651, at $0.05, 
Muskmelons, 3, ..... 
Peaches, peck, 1, .... . 
Pears, bushels, 43, at $1, . 
Peas, green, bushels, 7f, at $1, . 
Potatoes, bushels, 531^, at $0.95, 
Radishes, dozen bunches, 104, at $0.25, 
Raspberries, quarts, 5, at $0.10, 

Aviounts carried forward, 



$135 19 $10,999 00 

5 85 
225 00 

3 60 
12 00 

1 31 
16 31 

6 00 
76 05 

11 
26 50 
482 24 

14 79 
80 

7 30 
1 50 

11 90 

15 00 

8 13 

1,049 58 



$34 50 
7 81 
16 50 
2 69 

2 50 

5 65 
30 94 

6 98 
45 

9 00 
19 00 

3 20 
1 88 
.4 31 
1 88 

82 55 
10 
50 

43 00 

7 63 
504 93 

26 00 
50 



$812 50 $12,048 58 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



19 



Amounts brought forward, 

Spinach, bushels, If, at $0.40, . 
Squash, summer, barrels, 8|, at $1, 
Strawberries, quarts, 4, at S0.08, 
Tomatoes, quarts, 4, at $0.75 bushel, . 
Tomatoes, green, bushels, 4f , at $0.50, 
Turnip greens, bushels, 7, at $0.35, 
Turnips, white egg, barrels, 5.85, at $1.25, . 

Valley Farm. 

Apples, barrels, 12, at $3, . 

Beans, shell, bushels, 14^, at $1.25, 

Beans, string, bushels, 15j, at $1, 

Beets, bushels, 129^, at $0.50, . 

Beet greens, bushels, 45^, at $0.35, 

Blackberries, quarts, 30, at $0.10, 

Blueberries, quarts, 250, at $0.10, 

Cabbage, tons, 2.3335, at $20, . 

Carrots, bushels, 174, at $0.60, . 

Com, ensilage, tons, 40, at $5, . 

Com, fodder, tons, 2, at $5, . . . 

Corn, green, bushels, lOf , at $0.75, 

Cucumbers, boxes, 31, at $2, 

Eggs, dozen, 1,507^, at $0.35, 

Fowl, pounds, 313^, at $0.15, 

Grapes, pounds, 25, at $0.03, 

Lettuce, boxes, 217, at $0.75, 

Mangel wurzels, bushels, 135, at $0.25, 

Manure, cords, 40, at $6, . 

Manure, hen, barrels, 15, at $1 , . 

Milk, quarts, 6,924, at $0.05, 

Millet, tons, 5, at $5, 

Oats, green, tons, 25, at $5, . . . 

Onions, bushels, 42, at $0.85, 

Parsnips, bushels, 100, at $0.75, 

Peaches, baskets, 6, at $1, 

Pears, bushels, 2, at $1, 

Peas, green, bushels, 22f, at $1, . 

Poles, telephone, 7, at $4, . . . . 

Potatoes, bushels, 84H, at $0.95, 

Radishes, dozen bunches, 90, at $0.25, 

Rhubarb, pounds, 20, at $0.02, . 

ScuUions, bushels, 20, at $0.50, . 

Spinach, bushels, 8, at $0.40, 

Amounts carried forward, 



$812 50 $12,048 58 

65 
8 84 

32 

09 
2 37 
2 45 
7 31 

834 53 



$36 00 
18 13 
15 25 
64 75 
15 93 
3 00 
25 00 

46 67 
104 40 
200 00 

10 00 
8 06 
62 00 
527 54 

47 08 
75 

162 75 
33 75 

240 00 
15 00 

346 20 
25 00 

125 00 
35 70 
75 00 
6 00 

2 00 
22 75 
28 00 

799 43 
22 50 
40 
10 00 

3 20 



$3,137 24 $12,883 11 



20 



GARDNER STATE COLOXl'. 



[Dec. 



Amounts brought forward, 



$3,137 24 $12,883 11 



Squash, winter, tons. 2^\, at $30, 
Squash, summer, barrels. 6.46, at $1, . 
Tomatoes, bushels. 3.24, at $0.75, 
Tomatoes, green, bushels, 4.57, at §0.50. 
Turnips, Swedish, barrels, 924. at $1.25, 
Turnips, yellow globe, barrels. 64f , at $1.25, 
Wood, hard, cords. 25. at $4..50, 
Wood, soft, cords, 60, at $4.50, . 

Westmtxstzr Cott 
Apples, barrels, 78, at $3. . 
Beans, dry, bushels, 20, at $2.25. 
Beans, shell, bushels. 19, cr. $1.25, 
Beans, string, bushels. §1, 
Beets, bushels, 68f, at $0.50, 
Blackberries, quarts, 204, at $0.10, 
Blueberries, quarts, 531, at $0.10, 
Cabbage, tons, 7^, at $20, . 
Carrots, bushels, 182, at $0.60, . 
Com, ensilage, tons, 40, at $5, 
Com, fodder, tons, 4, at $5, 
Com, green, bushels, 73, at $0.75, 
Cucumbers, boxes, 13+. at $2, 
Cucumbers, pickling, pecks, 40, at $0.40, 
Eggs, dozen. 454^. at $0.35. 
Fowl, pounds. 223. at $0.15, 
Grapes, pounds. 400. at $0.03, . 
Ice. tons. 50. at S3. . 
Lettuce, boxes. 33. at $0.75. 
Mangel wurzels. bushels. 77. at $0.25 
Manure, cords, 30, at $6. . 
Manure, hen, barrels. 6. at $1, . 
:Milk. quarts. 16,003+, at $0.a5. 
^Millet, ton, 1, . 
Muskmelons, 75, at $0.03^, 
Onions, bushels, 44, at $0.85, 
Parsnips., bushels, 108, at $0.75, 
Pears, bushels, 12+, at $1, . 
Peas, bushels, 35, at $1, 
Pork, pounds, 766, at $0.08, 
Posts, hen yard. S feet 6 inches, 100, at $0. 
Potatoes, bushels, 941, at $0.95, 
Pumpkins, pounds, 3,750, at $0.03, 

Amounts carried forward, 



\GES. 



69 38 
6 46 
2 43 
2 29 
116 00 
SO 75 
112 50 
270 00 



$234 00 
45 00 

23 75 
4S 00 

34 as 

20 40 

53 10 
150 00 
109 20 
200 00 

20 00 

54 75 
27 00 
16 00 

159 OS 
33 45 
12 00 

150 00 

24 75 
19 25 

ISO 00 
6 00 
SOO 17 



00 
50 
40 
00 

50 



35 OO 
61 28 
20 00 
S93 95 
112 50 



3.797 05 



$3,681 41 $16.6-50 16 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



21 



Amounts brought forward, 

Radishes, dozen bunches, 3^, at S0.2o, 
Raspberries, quarts, 17, at SO.IO, 
Scullions, bushels, 25, at S0.50, . 
Squash, winter, tons, 1.4725, at $30, . 
Stakes, fence, 300, at SO.IO, 
Strawberries, quarts, 123, at S0.08, 
Tomatoes, bushels, Sj, at $0.75, 
Tomatoes, green, bushels, 7, at $0.50, 
Turnips, flat Dutch, barrels, 35.6, at $1.25, 
Turnips, ruta baga, barrels, 47.2, at $1.25, 
Turnips, white egg, barrels, 21.6, at $1.25, 
Wood, 4 feet, cords, 65, at $4.50, 

General. 

Crushed stone, sold, tons, 114, 
Ground bone, tons, 5, at $25, 
Hay, Enghsh, tons, 38, at $18, 
Hay, meadow, tons, 6, at $12, 
Ice, tons, 469, at $3, 
Lumber sawed, 46,000 feet, at $25 per M. 
Pork, pounds, 9,878, at $0.08, 
Sawdust, cords, 15, at $0.50, 
Slabs, cords, 8, at $3, 

Total products of farm. 

Live Stock. 

Horses, 12, . 

Cows, 47, at $50, .... 
Heifers (two to three years), 17, at $35, 
Heifers (one to two years), 17, at $25, 
Steers, 8, at $40, 
Bulls, 3, . 

Calves (6 weeks to 5 months), 9, at $1 
Oxen, 12, ... 
Sheep, 10, at $10, 
Lambs, 5, at $6, 
Ram, 1, ... 
Hogs, 12, at $18, 
Shotes, 44, at $8, 
Pigs, 7, at $2.50, 
Hens, 247, at $0.75, . 
Pullets, 196, at $0.50, 
Roosters, 57, at $0.50, 
Ducks, 2, at $1, 



$3,681 41 $16,680 16 

83 

1 70 
12 50 
44 17 
30 00 

9 84 

2 44 

3 50 
44 50 
59 00 
27 00 

292 50 
4,209 39 



$139 00 
125 00 
684 00 
72 00 
1,407 00 
1,150 00 
790 24 
7 50 
24 00 



4,398 74 
$25,288 29 



$2,800 00 
2,350 00 
595 00 
425 00 
320 00 
250 00 
135 00 
900 00 
100 00 
30 00 
30 00 
216 00 
352 00 
17 50 
185 25 
98 00 
28 50 
2 00 



$8,834 25 



22 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT. 



WORK DONE BY WOMEN. 



Aprons, carpenters , . 


19 


Doilies hemstitched, . 


36 


Aprons, dining room, attendants', 




Doilies outlined. 




Aprons, dining room, patients , . 


9 


Drawn work, linen '. — 




Aprons, kitchen, 


971 


Bureau scarfs. 


1 A 
ID 


Aprons, men s, ... 


18 


Center pieces. 


D 


Aprons, rubber. 


9 


Doilies, . . *. 


0_ 
23 


Aprons, white, waitress , 


o 


Table covers, 


15 


Bags, Christmas, 


DOS 


Sideboard scarfs. 


4 


Bags, coffee, .... 


Ol 


Drawers, ... 


46 


Bags, laundry, macrame, . 


9 


Dresses, .... 


214 


Bags, laundry, officers', 


91 


Face cloths crocheted. 


4 


Bags, laundry, patients', . 


1 O 


Garters, pairs, . 


24 


Baskets, reed, Itmch, 


1 


Gloves knitted, men's, pairs. 


1 


Baskets, reed and raffia. 




Glove wrists knitted, pairs. 


158 


Baskets, reed, waste. 


211 


Handkerchiefs : — 




Belts embroidered, 


11 


Men's, .... 


. 1,281 


Bunting for decoration, yards. 


30 


Women's, 


. 670 


Bureau covers hemmed, 


66 


Hats, straw : — 




Biu-eau covers, linen, hemstitched. 


12 


Men's, .... 


40 


Burial robes, .... 


24 


Women's, 


23 


Carriage covers. 


2 


Women's, trimmed. 


12 


Center pieces buttonholed. 


4 


Holders, iron, . 


77 


Center pieces outlined. 


2 


Jimapers, 


66 


Center pieces, Wallachian, 


2 


Linen, woven, yards. 


31 


Chemise, .... 


131 


Mantle scarfs, scrim, 


3 


Coats, khaki, dining room. 


14 


Medicine case, leather. 


1 


Coats, men's outside. 


318 


Mittens, canvas, pairs. 


. 318 


Collars embroidered. 


3 


Mittens knitted, men's, pairs. 


53 


Collars, tatting. 


5 


Napkins hemmed. 


72 


Corset covers, .... 


22 


Neckties, four-in-hand. 


. 326 


Curtains hemmed. 


14 


Neck scarf crocheted. 


1 


Curtains, scrim, sash. 


98 


Nightdresses, . 


. 174 


Doilies crocheted. 


8 


Overalls, 


. 382 


Doilies embroidered, 


3 


Pads, sanitary, 


. 525 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



23 



Pillow cases, 
Rugs : — 

Braided, 

Hooked, 
Shawls crocheted, 
Sheets hemmed. 
Shirts, hospital, 
Shirts, men's outing. 
Shirt waists. 

Shoe tops stitched, pairs, . 
Slipper tops stitched, pairs, 
Slippers crocheted, pairs, . 
Sofa pillows, gingham. 
Sofa pillows, huckabuck, . 
Sofa pillows, scrim, . 
Sofa pillow tops, huckabuck, 
Sofa pillow tops outlined, . 
Sofa pillow tops, scrim. 

Aprons, .... 

Bags, coffee. 

Bags, laundry. 

Bands sewed on men's hats, 

Bedspreads, 

Blankets, 

Caps, .... 

Carriage robes, 

Chemise, 

Coats, .... 
Collar, .... 
Corset covers, . 
Curtains, 

Doily, .... 
Drawers, 

Dresses, .... 
Elastic sewed on hats, 
Flag, times. 

Glove, .... 
Jumpers, 

Mittens, .... 



709 


Stockings knitted, women's, pairs 


2 




Stockings knitted, men's, pairs. 


1 


293 


Sunboimets, . . . . 


13 


40 


Suspenders, . . . . 


64 


7 


Table cloths hemmed, 


13 


916 


Table covers hemmed. 


13 


36 


Table covers hemstitched, linen. 


35 


588 


Table mats, braided straw, 


4 


20 


Ties hemstitched, women's. 


6 


53 


Towels hemmed. 


2,592 


237 


Tray cloths hemstitched, . 


3 


11 


Trays, raffia, . . . . 


5 


6 


Trousers, . . . . 


495 


11 


Typewriter cover. 


1 


13 


Vests, men's, . . . . 


195 


9 


Wool spun, pounds, . 


10 


7 


Wristers knitted, 


70 


8 


Wrists stitched on mittens, 


32 


Mending. 




Ill 


Napkins, . . . . 


7 


5 


Nightdresses, . . . . 


298 


19 


Overalls, . . . . 


1,276 


72 


Overcoats, . . . . 


8 


4 


Pillow cases, . . . . 


28 


383 


Rags colored, pounds. 


266 


13 


Rugs, . . . . . 


17 


2 


■Rugs bound, . . . . 


14 


368 


Sheets, 


391 


688 


Shirts, 


1,007 


1 


Sideboard cover, 


1 


28 


Stockings, pairs. 


10,266 


12 


Sweater, . . . . . 


1 


1 


Table covers, . . . . 


13 


446 


Tags sewed on. 


288 


425 


Trousers, . . . . 


1,533 


13 


Underdrawers, 


1,477 


5 


Undershirts, . . . . 


1,187 


1 


Underskirts, . . . . 


978 


244 


Vests, . . . . . 


2.52 


57 


Waists, . . . . . 


19 



24 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



WORK DONE BY MEN. 



Baskets, bushel, 


8 


Shoes made, pairs. 


39 


Baskets, half-bushel, 


20 


Shoes repaired : — 




Boots, felt, patched, pairs, 


7 


Counters, pairs. 


14 


Boots, rubber, patched, pairs, 


3 


Heels, pairs. 


30 


Brogans made, pairs, 


125 


Innersoles, pairs, . 


14 


Brogans repaired : — 




Relasted, pairs. 


14 


Counters, pairs. 


83 


Soles, pairs, . 


21 


Heels, pairs. 


158 


Tapped, 


24 


Innersoles, pairs, . 


83 


flippers made, pairs. 


175 


Relasted, pairs. 


83 


Slippers repaired: — 




Soles, pairs, . 


84 


Counters, pairs, 


. 255 


Tapped, pairs, 


134 


Heels, pairs, . 




Chairs, recaned : — 




Innersoles, pairs, . 


Zoo 


Backs, 


10 


Relasted, pairs. 


ZOO 


Seats, .... 


21 


Soles, pairs, . 


255 


Mats, cocoa, 


8 


Toweling woven, yards 


. 3,618 


Overshoes, rubber, patched, pairs, 3 








CARPENTER. 






Value. 




Value; 


Andirons, pair, 1, . 


S4 00 


Cupboards, 4, 


. S20 00 


Axles, 2, . . . . 


3 00 


Curtain stretcher, 1, 


50 


Baseball bats, 5, . 


3 75 


Door frame, 1, 


. 2 00 


Benches, dining room, long, 8, . 


6 00 


Doors, 3, . . . 


. 6 00 


Boxes, bread, 6, . . . 


18 00 


Evener, 1, 


. 2 00 


Boxes, card index, 14, 


7 00 


File handles turned, 12, . 


60 


Boxes for raising bread, 22, 


33 00 


Flower tubs, 28, 


. 4 20 


Boxes, plant, 70, 


10 50 


Frames, picture, 4, . 


1 60 


Bread board, 2, . . . 


1 00 


Gate boxes, 4, 


. 10 00 


Builders' brackets, 26, 


45 50 


Gauge on water tower, 1, 


. 2 00 


Btilletin board, 1, . 


75 


Ice rim, 1, . . . 


. 3 00 


Bunks, wagon, 2, . 


1 00 


Key board, 1, 


1 00 


Cabinet, bread, 1, . 


28 00 


Ladder extension, 27 feet. 


. 20 00 


Cabinet, kitchen, 1, 


50 00 


Lever (for stump puller), 1, 


. 2 00 


Can stoppers, turned, 25, 


1 25 


Looms, 6, . . . 


. 300 00 


Case of shelves, 1, . 


2 00 


Manhole covers, 7, . 


. 2 00 


Cesspool covers, 2, . 


10 00 


Ice rvm, 1, . . . 


3 00 


Chairs, camp, 12, 


9 00 


Meat board, 1, 


75 


Chairs, large mission, 20, 


100 00 


Milk can rack, 1, . 


. 1 00 


Chairs, large mission, rocking, 57, 


285 00 


Napkin boxes, set of. 


. 5 00 


Chest of drawers, 1, 


20 00 


Neck yokes, 5, 


. 7 50 


Clothes closets, set of, 1, . 


28 00 


Ox yokes, 2, . 


. 16 00 


Clothes posts, 4, . . . 


4 00 


Painters' brackets, 2, 


. 1 00 


Cradle for flag pole, 1, . 


2 00 


Piazza floors relaid, 2, 





1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



25 





Value. 




Value. 


Plant stands, 2, . . . 


$9 00 


Stone drags, 13, 


.$104 00 


Plough handles, 2, . 


1 00 


Swabs, 8, . . . 


. 4 00 


Post cap patterns, 2, 


2 50 


Tables, bedside, 10, 


. 22 00 


Rolling pins, 3, . . . 


60 


Table, desk, 1, 


. 10 00 


Sawhorses, 27, 


27 00 


Table, dining, 1, 


7 50 


Saws filed, 43, ... 


_ 


Tables, dining (for camp), 4, 


. 10 00 


Screen doors, 4, . 


8 00 


Table, kitchen, 1, . 


. 4 00 


Screens, window, 121, 


90 75 


Tables, 4 feet (round), 11, 


. 16 50 


Settee, long, 1, 


9 00 


Tables, zinc covered, 3, . 


. 30 00 


Shelves, D. R. truck, 14, 


14 00 


Telephone cabinet, 1, 


4 50 


Shoe racks, 2, . . . 


8 00 


Timber rolls, 2, 


3 00 


Shoe shanks, 450, 


4 50 




4 00 


Sign boards, 13, . 


5 20 


Wagon jack, 1, 


1 00 


Sill and floor to barn, 1, 




Wagon pole, 1, 


9 no 


Snow scraper, horse, 1, . 


2 00 


Water troughs, 4, . 


1 00 


Stakes, surveyor's, 600, . 


6 00 


Whiffle trees, 8, 


8 00 


BLACKSMITH AND MACHINIST. 




A.dz axes sharpened, 


o 
o 


X Lliig 1 t^bXIUCi, . . . 


1 


Axles set, .... 


1 7 


Road scraper made, . . 


1 


Bands, hub, etc., 


1 Q 


Sled runners made. 


7 


Bolts made, .... 


133 


Shaft irons made. 


3 


Braces made, .... 


8 


Shaft irons repaired. 


13 


Brackets made. 


103 


Snow plough ironed. 


1 


Crowbars made, 


12 


Spreader reironed, 


1 


Crowbars resteeled, . 


4 


Staples made, . 


8 


Crowbars sharpened. 


20 


Stone chisels made, . 


4 


Drag chains repaired. 


30 


Stone chisels sharpened. 


8 


Harrows repaired. 


8 


Stone drills made. 


82 


Hoes, fire, made, 


6 


Stone drills sharpened, 


. 1,503 


Hooks, hay, etc., made. 


103 


Stone hammers remade. 


12 


Ladder extension ironed, . 


1 


Tanks retinned. 


2 


Looms ironed, .... 


6 


Tires set. 


36 


Mason's tools made, . 


2 


Tools, caulking, 


8 


Mowing machines repaired. 


2 


Truss rods made. 


6 


Ox chain made, feet. 


27.75 


Wagon bodies reironed, 


6 


Oxen shod, pairs, 


126 


Wagon poles reironed. 


4 


Pans, etc., soldered, . 


700 


Wagon parts repaired. 


18 


Picks resteeled, 


37 


Wedges made, . 


12 


Picks sharpened. 


566 


Wheel boxes made, . 


10 


Pipe drills made. 


4 


Whiffletrees reironed. 


16 


Ploughs repaired, . . 


7 


Wrenches made. 


12 


Plug drills sharpened. 


1 






Plumbing, Maple and Fairview 








cottages, .... 









26 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



PAINTER. 



Andirons, pair, 


1 


Looms, .... 


6 


Beds enameled, 


2 


Kettles, large steam, 


3 


Blinds, pairs, . 


26 


Machinery in carpenter shop. 




Bread boxes, . 


2 


Napkin boxes, set of, 


1 


Buildings painted inside, . 


6 


Piano varnished, 


1 


Buildings painted outside, 


12 


Picture frames, 


4 


Card index boxes. 


14 


Rocking chairs, 


59 


Carpenters' brackets. 


26 


Screen doors, . . . . 


6 


Carriages, 


7 


Screens, . . . . . 


135 


Chairs, .... 


. 198 


Settees, . . . . . 


73 


Desk, roUtop, , 


1 


Signs lettered, . . . . 


23 


Fire pails lettered. 


12 


Sleigh, 


1 


Flag pole. 


1 


Tables, 


48 


Flower stands. 


2 


Wagons, . . . . . 


7 


Glass reset, lights, 


. 255 







KITCHEN. 

Manufactured. 

Soap, hard, pounds, . . . . . . . . . , 217 

), soft, pounds, . . . . . . . . . . 6,260 



Pickles, Preserves, etc. 



Apple jelly, quarts, . 


. 20.5 


Piccalilli, gallons. 


71 


Beans, string, canned, quarts. 


97 


Pickles, onions, quarts. 


18 


Blackberries, quarts. 


. 210 


Pickles, chopped, gallons, . 


8 


Blackberry jam, quarts. 


13 


Pickles, mixed, gallons, 


4 


Blackberry pickle, gallons, 


8 


Pickles, mustard, gallons, . 


16 


Blueberries, quarts, . 


. 1,057 


Pickles, salted, gallons. 


575 


Chili sauce, quarts, . 


18 


Pickles, sliced tomato, gallons, . 


182 


Chow-chow, quarts, . 


20 


Pickles, sweet, gallons. 


17 


Corn, canned, quarts. 


138 


Pickles, vinegar, gallons, . 


12 


Grape jam, gallons, . 


15 


Raspberries, quarts, . 


27 


Grape jelly, quarts, . 


158 


Sauerkraut, barrels, . 


3 


Peaches, quarts, 


40 


Strawberries, quarts, 


6 


Pears, quarts, . 


148 


Tomatoes, canned, quarts. 


95 


Pears, spiced, quarts, 


8 


Turnip greens, canned, quarts, . 


4 







1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



27 



LIST OF SALARIES. 



Superintendent (per year) , . . . . 


$2,500 00 


Assistant superintendent (per year) , 


1,200 00 


Assistant physician (per year), 


800 00 


Clerk (per month) , ..... 


40 00 


Stenographer (per month) , . . . . 


25 00 


Record clerk (per month) , . . . . 


20 00 


Supervisors (five male) (per month), 


. $35 00 to 55 00 


Supervisor, industrial (one female) (per month), 


35 00 


Kitchen men (three) (per month), . 


$30 00 to 45 00 


Cooks (four) (per month) , . . . . 


25 00 to 35 00 


Dining room matrons (two) (per month), 


. 20 00 and 25 00 


Waitresses (two) (per month). 


20 00 


Housekeepers (seven) (per month) , . 


$20 00 to 25 00 


Seamstress (one) (per month), 


25 00 


Engineer (one) (per month), .... 


91 66 


Assistant engineers (six) (per month) , 


. $45 00 to 55 00 


Firemen (four) (per month), .... 


35 00 to 40 00 


Laundry man (one) (per month) , . 


30 00 


Laundress (one) (per month) , ... 


28 00 


Attendants (thirty-three male) (per month), 


$23 00 to 33 00 


Attendants (fifteen female) (per month), . 


18 00 to 28 00 


Storekeeper (one) (per month), 


40 00 


Gardener (one) (per month) , . 


30 00 


Carpenter (one) (per month), .... 


55 00 


Carpenters (four) (nonresident) (per day), . 


$2 50 to 2 75 


Mason (one) (per day), ..... 


3 00 


Painter (one) (nonresident) (per day). 


2 75 


Herdsman (one) (nonresident) (per day), 


2 00 



28 



GARDXER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



YALUATIOX. 



Real Estate. 

Land, 1,603.51 acres, 
Water supply, 
Drainage system, 
Heating system. 
Lighting system. 
Power s^'stem. 
Telephone system. 
Administration building, 
Belcher cottage, 

Belcher bams, shed and hen house, 
Catalpa cottage, 
Domestic building, 
Gardner cottages, . 
Gardner bam, silo and hen house, 
Green house (under constmction), 
Hose house, 

Ice house, .... 
Industrial buildings (under construction). 
Maple cottage, 
^Mechanics' bmlding. 
Men's receiving ward. 
Old buildings. 
Paint shop. 
Power house, 
Pmnp houses (5), . 
Fair^-iew cottage and bam, 
Stone cmshing plant and sawmill. 
Storage cellars (under constmction) , 
Storehouse, .... 
Valley farm cottage, bam and sheds, 
Valley farm annex, 
Westminster cottages, 
Westminster bam, silo and hen house, 
Women's receiving ward, 

Total real estate, 



$477,764 42 



1-909.] PUBLIC DOCOIENT — Xo. 



70. 



29 



Personal Estate. 
Pro\'isions and groceries, .... 
Ready-made clothing, ..... 
Dr\^ goods : — 

For clothing, ...... 

For bedding, etc., ..... 
Furnishings : — 

Beds and bedding in inmates' department, 

Other furnishings, ..... 

Personal property of State in superintendent 
partment, .... 

All other property, .* 
Heat, light and power: — 

Fuel, ..... 

All other property, . 
Repairs and improvements: — 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures. 

All other property, . 
Farm, stable and grounds: — 

Live stock of the farm on hand, 

Produce of the farm on hand, . 

Carriages and agricultural implement 

Fire apparatus. 

All other property, . 
Miscellaneous : — 

Drugs and medicines, 

Tobacco, .... 

Librar>^, .... 

Other supplies undistributed, . 

Total personal estate. 
Total real and personal estate, 



30 



GARDXER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Gardner State Colony. 

I respectfully submit the follo^'ing report of the finances of this 
institution for the fiscal year ending Nov. 30. 1909: — 



Balance Dec. 1, 190S, 



Cash Accotxt. 



S405 61 



Receipts. 



Institution Receipts, 
Board of inmates : — 

Reimbursements, 
Salaries, wages and labor : — 

Labor of employees, 
Sales : — 

Food, 

Clothing and materials, 

Fm-nishings, 

Heat, light and power. 

Repairs and improvements, 

^liscellaneous. 

Farm, stable and grounds : — 
Cows and calves. 
Pigs and hogs, . 
Hides, 
Ice, . 
Sundries, . 

Miscellaneous receipts : — 

Interest on bank balances, 



S49 83 
255 63 
22 
4 95 
4 55 
141 62 



S4 00 
10 85 
88 02 
1 75 
74 55 



81,353 02 
1 52 



456 SO 



179 17 

95 3S 



2,0S5 89 



Receipts from Treasury of Commonwealth. 
Maintenance appropriations : — 

Balance of 190S ($6,596.16, less retiimed, S2.30), 
Advance monej' (SS,000, less returned, 8734.52), 
Approved schedules of 1909, 

Special advances (82,000, less returned, S889.86), . 
Special appropriations, ..... 



Total, 



36,593 86 
7,265 48 
97,734 52 

§1,110 14 
26,061 81 



111,593 86 

27,171 95 
8141,257 31 



1909.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 70. 



31 



Payments. 

To treasury' of Commonwealth, institution receipts, S2,085 89 

Maintenance appropriations : — 

Balance November schedule, 190S, . . 7,247 79 

Eleven months' schedules, 1909, . . . 101,786 92 

November advances, . . . . . 817 17 

Special appropriations : — 

Approved schedules ($27,171.95, less November, 1908, advances, 
$248.32), 



8111,937 77 



26,923 63 



Balance Nov. 30, 1909 : — 
In bank, 
In oflBce, 



S2,113 73 

282 IS 



Total, 



2,395 91 



8141,257 31 



Maixtexaxce. 



Appropriation, . 

Expenses (as analyzed below), 



8105,000 00 
105,000 00 



Analysis of Expenses. 



Salaries, wages and labor : — 
General administration, 
Medical ser\'ice, . 
Ward ser\ice (male), . 
Ward ser%ice (female). 
Repairs and improvements. 
Farm, stable and grounds. 



Food : — 
Butter, 
Butterine, . 
Beans, 

Bread and crackers. 

Cereals, rice, meal, etc 

Cheese, 

Eggs, 

Flour, 

Fish, 

Fruit (dried and fresh) 
Meats, 

Molasses and syrup. 
Sugar, 

Tea, coffee, broma and 
Vegetables, 
Svmdries, . 



Clothing and materials : — 
Boots, shoes and rubbers, 

Clothing, 

Dr>- goods for clothing and small wares. 



813,814 42 
4,496 34 
10,079 OS 
4,057 86 
4,064 51 
3,093 64 



SS43 89 

1,049 20 
515 71 
170 82 
720 27 
102 11 
231 85 

4,698 85 

1,210 87 
183 60 

5,071 54 
119 79 

1,142 86 
612 65 
836 61 

1,005 65 



8702 09 
39S 56 
2,742 03 



839,605 85 



18,516 27 



Amounts carried forward, .... 83,842 6S 858,122 12 



32 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



Amounts brought forward, 

Clothing and materials — Con. 
Furnishing goods, 
Hats and caps, . 
Leather and shoe findings, 
Sundries, ... 



$3,842 68 $58,122 12 



Furnishings : — 

Beds, bedding, table linen, etc.. 

Brushes, brooms. 

Carpets, rugs, etc., 

Crockery, glassware, cutlery, etc., 

Furniture and upholstery. 

Kitchen furnishings, 

Wooden ware, buckets, pails, etc., 

Sundries, . . . . , 

Heat, light and power : — 
Coal, 

Freight on coal, 
Gasoline, . 
Oil, . 
Sundries, . 

Repairs and improvements : — 
Brick, .... 
Cement, lime and plaster, 
Doors, sashes, etc., 
Electrical work and supplies. 
Hardware, 

Lumber, .... 
Machinery, etc., . 
Paints, oil, glass, etc., 
Plimibing, steam fitting and suppl: 
Roofing and materials, 
Sundries, . 



Farm, stable and grounds : — 
Blacksmith and supplies, 
Carriages, wagons, etc., and repairs, 
Fertilizers, \anes, seeds, etc.. 
Hay, grain, etc., 
Harnesses and repairs, 
Horses, 

Other live stock. 
Tools, farm machines, etc. 
Sundries, . 

Miscellaneous : — 

Books, periodicals, etc.. 
Chapel services and entertainments. 
Freight, expressage and transportation. 
Hose, etc., .... 
Medicines and hospital supplies, . 



249 28 
11 25 

1,594 31 
95 



$1,437 64 
123 55 
221 24 
360 34 
331 66 
418 76 
63 49 
350 21 



$6,311 62 
4,028 38 
18 47 
146 04 
190 92 



$9 20 
313 32 
56 30 
901 10 
955 93 
1,524 03 
601 93 
1,004 22 
2,095 91 
7 06 
814 87 



$499 40 

685 12 
2,856 54 
5,098 70 

274 51 
1,000 00 

248 50 
1,056 00 

215 00 



$55 82 
316 83 
2,034 85 
134 74 
515 14 



5,698 47 



3,306 89 



10,695 43 



8,283 87 



11,933 77 



Amounts carried forward, 



$3,057 38 $98,040 55 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 70. 



33 



Amounts brought forward, 



S3,057 38 



^,040 55 



Miscellaneous — Con. 

Medical attendance, nurses, etc. (extra) 
Manvial training supplies, 
Postage, .... 
Printing and printing supplies, 
Printing annual report, 
Return of runaways, . 
Soap and laundr^' supplies, . 
Stationer^'- and office supplies, 
Travel and expenses (officials), 
Telephone and telegraph, 
Tobacco, .... 
Sundries, .... 



Total expenses for maintenance. 

Special Appropriatiox: 



Balance Dec. 1, 190S, 
Appropriations for fiscal year. 



Total, 



85 75 
542 45 
197 60 
136 69 

97 86 
154 41 
630 36 
2S6 54 
439 78 
672 67 
621 54 

36 42 



Expended during the year (see statement annexed), 827,171 95 

Reverting to treasury- of Conunonwealth, . . 47 37 



6,959 45 



S105,000 00 



S12,61S 61 
27,350 00 

$39,968 61 



27,219 32 



Balance Nov. 30, 1909, 



$12,749 29 



Resources axd Liabilities. 
Resources. 

Cash on hand, ....... 82,395 91 

November cash vouchers (paid from advance money), 817 17 



Liabilities. 



Schedule of November bills. 



83,213 OS 
S3,213 OS 



34 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. [Dec. 1909. 



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Statistical tables. 



[Form prescribed by State Board of Insanity.] 



V 




1. — General Statistics of the Year. 



Ixsjlxe. 



Males. I Females. I Totals. 



Patients in colony Oct. 1, 19C^ \ 

Admitted within the year, 

Viz. : by transfer, 

from visit, 

from escape, 

Whole number of cases within the year 

Dismissed within the year 

Vi2.: Discharged, 

as recovered at time of leaving hospital, 

as capable of self-support 

as improved 

as not improved, 

as not insane. 

Died. 

Transferred, 

Escaped, 

On visit Oct. 1, 1909, 

Patients remaining Sept. 30, 1909 

Vi«.: Supported as State patients 

as private patients. 

as reimbursing patients. . I 

Number of different persons within the year 

Number of dififerent i)ersons admitted, 

Number of different persons dismissed 

Number of different persons recovered, 

Number of different persons discharged as capable of self-support. 

Daily average of patients, 

Viz.: State patients, 

private patients, 

reimbursing patients, 



365 


177 


542 


69 


30 


99 


65 


30 


95 


4 




4 


A'H 1 


Ml 


641 


46 


13 


59 


6 




6 


2 


- 


2 


4 




4 


12 


- 
4 


16 


18 


7 


25 


10 




10 




2 


2 


388 


m 


oS2 


3S4 


191 


575 


4 


3 


7 


432 


207 


639 


67 


30 


97 


44 


13 


57 


2 




2 


365.32 


187.32 


552. ( 


359.62 


183.64 


543.: 


5.70 


3.68 


9.: 



^ Includes 2 patients absent on escape at the beginning of the year, and nominallj- admitted 
for discharge. 



38 GARDNER STATE COLONY. [Dec. 



2. — Received on First and Subsequent Adynissions. 



NUMBER OF ADMISSION. 


Cases admitted. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


First (to the colony), 


65 


30 


95 


Second (to the colon}"), . 








Total cases, .... 


65 


30 


95 


Total persons, 


65 


30 


95 



3. — Ages of Insane at First Attack and Death. 





Persons died. 


AGES. 


AT 


FIRST ATTACK. 


AT TIME OF DEATH. 




Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Tot-als. 




3 


_ 


3 


- 


- 


- 


±0 J CcLLs cLLiyx ICOO, . . 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


riuiii lo Lu yediro, 


1 


- 


1 




— 




fr\ "VPnTs; 


1 




1 

J. 


1 

X 




1 

X 


25 to 30 years, 




2 


2 


1 




1 


30 to 35 years, 


2 




2 


1 


1 


2 


35 to 40 years. 


1 


2 


3 


2 


1 


3 


40 to 50 years. 


2 




2 


1 


2 


3 


50 to 60 years. 


2 




2 


5 




5 


60 to 70 years. 








1 




1 


70 to 80 years. 














Over 80 years, 














Total, . 


12 


4 


16 


12 


4 


16 


Unknown, 














Not insane, 














Total persons, . 


12 


4 




12 


4 


16 


Mean known age (in years), 


27.4 


32.2 


29.8 


44.1 


39.7 


41.9 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — 



No. 70. 



39 



Total 
Discharges 

AND 

Deaths. 


•SJB^OJ, 


1 ^ 1 


^ O M 1 1 


O <M (M 
<M (M 






—1 1 1 —1 1 1 


eo -<*i 




■<*<CO 1 <MrH^ 1 


-H »-i-^cq 1 1 1 


00 00 


Died. 

1 




CO(M 1 M ^ 1 1 


00 lio^^^ljoo CO «o 




1 <-< 1 1 1 1 1 


--H 1 N 1 ^ 1 1 


CC rt< 


•8aiBi\[ 


CO .-H 1 tH 1 1 


t~- 1 CCt^ I i-H 1 


>0 (M IM 


Not 
Insane. 


•eiB^jox 




1 1 1 


•saiBuiaj 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 


•sapj^ 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


, , , 


Not 
improved. 


•S^B^JOJL 


1 1 1 1 1 


c ^, , , , , 


r-l rj< -.It 


•eapraaj 






1 1 1 


•gai^j^ 


rtirq 1 1 1 1 1 


CO ^ 1 1 1 1 1 




Improved, 


•eiB^ojL 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




, , , 


•sa^Braaj 






1 1 1 


•eaiBj^ 






1 1 1 


Discharged 
Capable 
OF Self- 
support. 




1 1 1 1 1 —1 1 




1-1 (M <M 


•ea^Braaj 






•sai^pj; 






i-H (M (M 


Re- 
covered. 


•S(b:^ox 









•ea^Braaj 




1 1 I 1 1 I 1 




•sapj^ 







1 1 1 


Admitted. 


•epiox 




O >0 


•saiBinaj 


(M05 1 1 .^ro-H 


o 1 iM e<» 1 1 1 


Tt< O O 
CO CO 


•8a^Bi\[ 




O 1-1 ^ 1 1 — 1 


»o >o iC 


FORM OF DISEASE. 


A. — First admitted to any hospital when received by in- 

stitution from which transferred: — 
Congenital mental deficiency, .... 

Dementia, organic, 

Manic-depressive insanity, ..... 

Toxic insanity (alcoholic, chronic). 

Involution psychosis, 

Total A 

B. — Other admissions: — 

Congenital mental deficiency, .... 

Manic-depressive insanity, 

Paranoia 

Toxic insanity (chronic, alcoholic). 

Toxic insanity (morphine) 

Total B 

Aggregate cases, 

Aggregate persons, 



40 



GARDNER 



STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



Totals. 


■SIB^^OX 


(M 






■^111 






^ 1 1 


00 


Died. 


•siB^ox 


O 1 1 1 


to oo 




1 1 1 


,-1 




CO \ \ \ 




Not Insane. 


•siB^ox 


, , , . 






1 1 1 1 




•S8I'BI\[ 


1 1 1 1 




Not improved. 


•eiB^ox 


CO ^ 1 1 


CO 




. , . , 






eo ^ 1 1 


■.fl CO 


Improved. 


•SIB(^OX 


, , , , 






1 1 1 1 






1 1 1 1 


1 1 


Capable of 
Self-support. 


•siB^ox 


C<l 1 1 1 


(M 1-1 


•saxBuiaj 


1 1 1 1 






(Mill 




Recovered. 


•si^^ox 


1 1 1 1 




•saiBinaj 




1 1 




1 1 1 1 


1 1 


NUMBER 
OF ADMISSIONS. 


Third 

Total cases, 

Total persons first admitted to 
any hospital when admitted 
to institution from which 
transferred, .... 



1909.] 



PUBLIC 



DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



Paranoia. 


•ep^ox 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ^ 1 






1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ^ 1 






' ' ' 




Toxic 
Insanity. 


•sp^ox 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ^ 1 1 






1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 






1 1 1 1 1 1 1 "-H 1 1 




Congenital 

Mental 
Dbpiciency. 


•SIB^JOX 


1 1 ^ 1 1 CO 1 1 1 1 


CO 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


' 




1 1^1 1 (M 1 1 1 1 




Manic- 
depressive 
Insanity. 


•SIB^OX 


1 1 1 ^ ^ 1 1 1 1 1 


(M 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 






Dementia 

PRiECOX. 


•sI'b:jox 








1 1 1 1 1 1 1 '-' 1 




•S9IBJ\[ 


1 i-H ^ 1 1 1 CO 1 1 1 




Senile 
Dementia. 


•eiB^jox 


I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


CO 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 






CO 


Aggregates. 


•B^BIJOX 


^^cq.-11-icoeoco^co 


«5 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ^ '-H CO 






rHi-ico-Hi-icoeo.-^ 1 1 


CO 


CAUSES OF DEATH. 


Cerebral hemorrhage, 
Chronic diffuse nephritis. 

Myocarditis 

Acute cardiac dilatation, 
Gangrene of lung, . 
Lobar pneumonia, . 
Pulmonary tuberculosis, . 
General miliary tuberculosis, . 
Hypostatic pneumonia, . 
Mitral insufficiency. 

Totals 



42 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



All Other Admissions. 


whole known 
period of hospital 
residence. 


•SIt3C^OX 


1 r 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


r 1 


1 1 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


t 1 


' ' 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 


1 1 


WHOLE KNOWN 
PERIOD OF MENTAL 
DISEASE. 


•ep^^ox 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 


1 1 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 


1 1 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 


1 1 


First admitted to Any Hospital when received by Institution 

FROM which transferred. 


WHOLE DURATION. 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 


1 1 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 


1 1 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


' ■ 


1 1 


HOSPITAL RESIDENCE. 


•ei^^ox 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 






1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 


1 1 




1 1 1 1 f 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 


1 1 


DURATION 
BEFORE ADMISSION. 


•eiBijox 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 


1 1 




i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 


1 t 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




1 1 


PERIOD. 


A. — Recovered: — 

Congenital, 

Under 1 month, .... 
From 1 to 3 months, 

3 to 6 months, 

6 to 12 months, 

1 to 2 years, . 

2 to 5 years, . 
5 to 10 years, . 

10 to 20 years, . 
Over 20 years, .... 

Totals 

Unknown, 

Totals, 

Average of known cases (in months), 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — Xo. 70. 



43 



I I I I I I c* 



I I I I C5 



I I I I I n I 



I I I — X 



. . C I 

I T r S I 

'5 ^ I r I r* c ' 

= = = >,>,>■.>, f 

--zl^^~f, ^ ■ ■ i 

= t. r* _3 r* -:i 

I I; 



Public Document 



No. 70 



EIGHTH ANXUAL EEPORT 

OF 

THE TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

Gardner State Colony, 

FORMERLY STATE COLONY FOR THE INSANE, 
AT GARD]S'ER, MASS., 

FOR THE 

Year exdtxg Xovember 30, 1910. 




BOSTON: 

WEIGHT & POTTEE PEIXTIXG CO., STATE PEINTEES, 

18 Post Office Square. 

'''if 



STATE HOUSE, BOSTON. 

/ 



Approved by 
The State Board of Publication. 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

List of Officers, 5 

Report of Trustees, 7 

Report of Superintendent, 9 

Industrial Department, 16 

Farm Products, by Colonies, 23 

Report of Treasurer, 34 

Statistical Tables, 39 



3 




TRUSTEES ASTD OFFICERS 



OF THE 

GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



Bosird of Trustees. 

EDMUND A. WHITMAN, Chairman, 
Mrs. AMIE H. COES, Secretary, 
GEORGE N. HARWOOD, . 
WILBUR F. WHITNEY, . 
Mrs. ALICE M. SPRING, 
WILLIAM H. BAKER, M.D., 
JOHN G. BLAKE, M.D., . 

Superintendent and Treasurer. 

CHARLES E. THOMPSON, M.D. 



Cambridge. 
Worcester. 
Barre. 

South Ashburxham. 

FiTCHBURG. 

Lyxx. 
Boston. 



Assistant Superintendent. 
THOMAS LITTLEWOOD, M.D. 



Assistant Physician. 

PAUL R. FELT, M.D. 



Mrs. Lillian A. Greene, 
Mr. Albert D. Darling, 
Mr. John H. Jenkins, 
Mr. Albert E. Gates, 
Mr. Custer A. Parker. 
Mrs. Bertha A. Brooks, 

Miss Hannah V. Buck, 
Mr. George A. Greene, 

Matrons. 
Mrs. E. L. Brtan-t. 
Mrs. S. G. Harrington. 
Mrs. J. A. York. 
Mrs. H. J. Larkin. 
Mrs. G. C Burgess. 
Mrs. Mabel Sanderson. 



Directors of Industries. 

Director of Iridustries for Women. 
. Director of Industries for Men. 
. Supervisor of Furniture Making. 
. Supervisor of Painting. 
. Supervisor of Shoemaking. 
Tailor ess. 



Supervisors. 



Colonies. 



Women's Receiving Ward. 
Men's Receiving Ward. 



Westminster Cottages. 
Valley Farm Cottages. 
Gardner Cottages. 
Belcher Cottage. 
Hillcrest Camp. 
Fai^^-iew Cottage. 



Supervisors. 
Mr. E. L. Bryant. 
Mr. S. G. Harrington. 
Mr. J. A. York. 
Mr. H. J. Larkin. 
Mr. G. C. Burgess. 



Miss Helen I. MacMaster, ..... Bookkeeper. 

........ Stenographer. 

Mrs. Mae F. Cornish, Record Clerk. 

Mr. Wallace A. Burt, ...... Director of Music. 



^\)t vCommoniucaltl) of illassacliusctts. 



TRUSTEES' KEPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

We have the honor to present the eighth annual report of the 
trustees of the Gardner State Colony. 

We are happy to be able to report a substantial advance in the 
progress of the colony during the past year. With the completion 
of the two industrial buildings, we have now excellent facihties 
for the traimng of our patients in indoor occupations. Patients 
are now making and mending all our clothing, mending and mak- 
ing our shoes, and all om* men are wearing, during the summer, 
straw hats made by the patients. Our food supply is, in increas- 
ing amount, produced by patients. Apart from a purchase of 
potatoes, made necessary by a loss through freezing, before our 
new cellars could be completed, we have raised on omt farm all 
the vegetables that we have used during the past year. In some 
directions we are now producing more of certain articles than we 
can use ourselves, and the problem of disposing of them is press- 
ing for solution. For example, patients are making large numbers 
of the old-fashioned mats braided from rags. These are market- 
able and can be readily sold. It would seem only just that the 
proceeds of such sales should be retained by the trustees, to be 
expended in the purchase of material comforts and little luxuries 
for the patients engaged in production, which we would hardly 
be justified in brndng from our regular appropriation. We there- 
fore recommend that an act be passed gi^'ing such permission to 
all institutions for the insane where productive labor is encour- 
aged. The retiims from the sales of goods would be ample to 
pay for the cost of the materials used, and leave a surplus. 

We are this year asking for an appropriation for a cottage for 
30 men. Our experience seems to demonstrate that patients may 
be grouped in smaller numbers than has been heretofore thought 



8 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. [Dec. 



economical, with no increase, and even with a decrease, in cost. 
The smaller groups also tend to increased contentment on the 
part of the patients, with a consequent decreased cost for restraint. 

We also ask for additional quarters for our attendants, and 
especially for married couples. The supervision of the industries 
of our patients calls for a higher type of attendant than the kind 
that has no duties beyond restraint. We should therefore be in 
a position to offer them homelike surroundings when off duty, 
and shorter hours of duty. Ten and eleven hours a day for the 
full seven days in the week are more than should be required of 
our attendants, and as their duties become more and more indus- 
trial, their hours may more nearly approach the eight-hour basis. 
We also expect a higher wage scale, but trust that may be offset 
by the increased efficiency of the patient labor and the consequent 
increase in production, for this is, to a large extent, dependent 
upon the interest and skill of the attendants. 

We take great pride in the progress of the colony and we trust 
its work will become better known. At the same time we recog- 
nize that we are working in an unknown field, and we need every 
aid that experience elsewhere can give us. We are surprised to 
learn that the law does not permit the superintendent to visit 
institutions outside the Commonwealth, where similar work is 
being attempted, except at his own expense. It does not seem 
to us wise that we should be thus cut off from profiting by a 
knowledge of the successes as well as the failures of institutions 
in other States, and we would recommend such change in the law 
as will permit such visits under the supervision of your honorable 
body. 

We again repeat our obligation to our superintendent. Dr. 
Charles E. Thompson, for his efficient and devoted service. 

Respectfully yours, 

EDMUND A. WHITMAN. 
GEORGE N. HARWOOD. 
ALICE MILLER SPRING. 
AMIE H. GOES. 
WILBUR F. WHITNEY. 
JOHN G. BLAKE. 
WILLIAM H. BAKER. 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



9 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Gardner State Colony. 

I respectfully submit herewith the eighth annual report of the 
Gardner State Colony. 

In matters relating to patients the year ends September 30, 
while those concerning finances are for the year ending Nov. 30, 
1910. 

Patients. 

On Oct. 1, 1909, there were at the colony, men, 388; women, 
194, — a total of 582. During the year 79 men and 33 women 
have been admitted, as follows: 55 men and 30 w^omen from the 
Northampton State Hospital; 15 men from the Worcester State 
Hospital; 9 men and 1 woman from elopement; 2 women from 
visit. 

Forty-nine men and 20 women have been dismissed, as follows: 
3 men and 1 woman as recovered ; 1 man and 1 woman as capable 
of self-support; 2 men and 1 woman as improved; 4 men and 1 
woman as not improved. Ten men and 6 women have died. 
Nineteen men and 9 women have been transferred to other hos- 
pitals, as follows: 11 men and 3 women to the Worcester State 
Asylum; 16 men and 6 women to the Tewksbury State Infirmary; 
1 man to the Danvers State Hospital. 

Six men have eloped and have not been returned. Four men 
and 1 woman are out on visit, so that pur actual census for 
Oct. 1, 1910, is, men, 418; women, 207, — a total of 625. 

The whole number cared for during the year was, men, 460; 
women, 225, — a total of 685. 

The daily average during the year ending Sept. 30, 1910, has 
been 602, and for the financial year ending Nov. 30, 1910, 610, — 
an increase of 50 over last year. 

The general health of our patients has been good and there has 
been no outbreak of any contagious disease. 



10 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



Indoor Industries. 

The two industrial buildings under construction at the time of 
my last report were completed early in the year and have proved 
very satisfactory. A larger number can now be employed under 
systematic supervision, and a greater variety of articles made. 
At the present time 61 are regularly employed in these buildings, 
while of our total number of patients, So per cent, are daily em- 
ployed in some useful and helpful occupation. 

"We are now making all clothing for both men and women, except 
knitted underwear, all boots, shoes, slippers, gloves, mittens, hats, 
caps, stockings, furniture, brooms and mats; weaving all toweling 
and half of our shirting, while a large amount of mending, fancy 
work and basketry is done by the women patients. 

Furniture purchased not being adapted to our use, we have 
opened a furniture department, under direction of a skilled in- 
structor, and will hereafter make all of oiu* own furniture, of every 
description. 

For several months we have knitted, on hand machines, all 
stockings worn by our men, and are now making all stockings 
required for our women patients. 

Broom, brush and mattress making has been recently intro- 
duced. 

Re:\l\rks. 

I am frequently asked, "How many do you discharge as ctired?" 
We have received, thus far, patients by transfer only, from other 
hospitals, they being in the main of that class of mild, demented 
or harmlessly delusional patients whose prospects of recovery are 
quite remote. "\Miere actual degeneration of brain substance 
has occurred, the destroyed tissues cannot be repaired. This 
condition is entirely distinct from mental confusion without 
degeneration. 

Of 100 cases received during the past year 94 were cases in 
which recovery is unusual, 57 per cent, being cases of dementia 
praecox, — largely of the hebephrenic type, — in whom at best 
not over S per cent, of all cases recover; 12 per cent, cases of 
dementia due to alcoholic excesses, while 25 per cent, were cases 
of congenital deficiency, of whom 72 per cent, were classed as of 
low grade. 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCmiENT — No. 70. 



11 



We have, therefore, to deal with patients of reduced mentality, 
and our efforts are directed to the prevention of further loss of 
mind, and the stimulation and training of that mind which 
remains. 

It can at once be seen then, that, in general, the best we can 
hope for is to so regulate a patient's habits and occupation that 
his remaining intellect will be stimulated, his bodily condition 
improved, and, by properly selecting his occupation and persist- 
ently directing him in it, that deeper dementia be warded off. 
Coincident with this, secondary, but actually of great importance, 
is the return to the Commonwealth of the product of his labor, — 
labor which, to the patient, has been most beneficial. 

Therefore our aim is to treat our patients by the best systematic 
treatment, — occupation, — while assisting and encouraging them 
to aid in their own support. Some, a comparatively small per 
cent., will go into the community again as self-supporting citizens; 
how many, time alone can tell us. 

Two questions, then, suggest themselves. First, how much are 
these patients benefited by industrial treatment? Second, what 
has been the return coincident with, but distinctly secondary to, 
this form of treatment? 

To the first I would answer that we cannot overstate the benefit 
derived. Individual cases illustrate this best, but taken all 
together they are far easier to care for, far less untidy, destructive 
and troublesome; brighter, more active, contented and cheerful. 
The requests to leave the colony are few, which alone, to those 
familiar with our hospitals for the mentally afilicted, tells its own 
story. 

In our endeavor to check existing dementia we are constantly 
saying to ourselves that this present dementia, and especially 
the physical inactivity, should not have been allowed to reach 
this stage, but the same occupations they are now engaged in 
should have been open to them directly after their discharge from 
the acute receiving ward. This leads me to say that industries 
as an important form of treatment belong more to the acute 
hospital, — to prevent patients becoming pauperized institution- 
ally rather than to stimulate them after they have become so. 

The second question will answer itself by reference to the tables 
of farm and industrial products in the following pages, keeping 



12 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



in mind that a very large part of this work has been done by 
patients. 

The products of the farm are tabulated by colonies. Disre- 
garding figures, it is sufficient to say that during the past two 
years we have raised all the vegetables consumed, with the excep- 
tion of less than 100 bushels of potatoes, and this was due to many 
of ours spoiling because of improper storage facilities. New stor- 
age cellars should now prevent this. 

Outdoor Industries. 

We have continued the reclamation of waste land as heretofore. 
This provides occupation for a class of men who could not well 
do other work, and the land, after it is subdued, yields good crops. 

Crops this year have been very satisfactory and should provide 
an abundant supply of all kinds of vegetables for the year. 

The Hillcrest camp has been occupied again this year by 16 
men, who have carried on the cultivation of the farm there with. 
most satisfactory results, while enjoying more normal, homelike 
surroundings. This farmhouse vn\\ not be closed this winter, as 
heretofore, but, after a few changes, will be occupied throughout 
the year. 

Owing to a reduced appropriation for maintenance it was not 
thought advisable to open the Goodale camp. 

Women have been employed in gardening at the Fairview cot- 
tage, and in all other departments have assisted in harvesting. 
They have picked 4,396 quarts of wild berries, and have made 
446 M pounds of butter. 

I would call your attention to the following table, which shows 
the amount of work done on farm and grounds : — 



Acres vegetables, 75 

Acres green feed, 23 

Acres hay, 35^ 

Total acres under cultivation, . 133f 

Total value of farm products, $30,310 87 

Acres land brought under cultivation, 31f 

Acres brush land subdued, 52 

Acres woodland cleared of undergrowth, 40 

Acres pasture land cleared, 10 

Acres reforested with 15,000 pine seedlings, .... 12 

Apple and pear trees set out, 240 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 13 

Vines and small fruits, 616 

Shade trees, 45 

Feet building lumber cut and sawed, 55,000 

Excavation : — 

Earth (cubic yards), 6,555 

Rock (cubic yards), 3,228 

Grading about buildings (square j^ards), 3,157 

Stone removed from fields, 6,941 tons, used as follows: — 

In building (tons), 1,113 

In roads (tons), 2,685 

In walks (tons), 764 

In fniing (tons), 1,879 

Crushed in stone crusher (tons), 500 



This table shows that our farm must have benefited greatly 
and our grounds been much improved, but this cannot be com- 
pared with the benefit derived by the patients who have done it, 
which is the primary object of such work. 

While sometimes we wish for highly developed farm land, the 
wisdom of the Commonwealth in purchasing this rough land has 
been clearly proved. 

Construction and Betterments. 

The cottage for 28 women patients, Highland cottage, granted 
last year, is now being plastered, and should be in use about March 
1. The cottage for married employees is ready for plastering. 
Both of these have been built entirely by our own mechanics, 
which takes longer than when done by contract, but the final 
result is more satisfactory. 

The steel water tower was erected directly after my last report, 
and was accepted on April 23. For the first time since the open- 
ing of the colony we now have an ample supply of excellent water, 
with a sufficient amount stored for an emergency. We passed 
through the last very dry season without curtailment in the use 
of water, which would seem to demonstrate the adequacy of the 
supply for some years. On the very afternoon the tank was 
filled for the first time, sparks from a passing locomotive set fire 
to our lumber pile and paint shop, threatened the mechanics' 
building and powder house, and undoubtedly would have proved 
more serious had it occurred on the previous day, with only our 
old supply to draw from. 



14 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



The 6-inch service main has been extended 240 feet, by our 
own labor, to the carpenter and paint shops, for fire protection, 
and 750 feet to the Highland cottage. 

iNlinor alterations have been made in the old Gates place, and 
the same occupied by the family of our head carpenter. 

Numerous small additions and improvements have been made. 

General. 

As in the past, Protestant services have been held every other 
Sunday. Rev. Robert S. Cheney, having removed from Gardner 
to enter a wider field of duty in Southborough, terminated his 
services with us early in the year, since when they have been 
conducted by the Rev. G. H. Hardy of Ashburnham. The Rev. 
J. F. McDermott and Rev. T. P. Ryan of Gardner have visited 
us when called, and ministered to those who were ill. 

One of our needs in the near future will be a chapel, in which 
services may be held each Sunday. 

Early in the spring an orchestra was organized among the 
patients. Mr. W. A. Burt of Gardner was engaged as musical 
director, and this has been very successful. This orchestra has 
furnished music for dances every second week and on holidays, 
and has given several out-of-door concerts during the summer. 
It has been enjoyed more than any other form of entertainment 
we have provided. 

On alternate weeks during the winter stereopticon views were 
shown by members of the staff. All holidays have been appro- 
priately observed with entertainments by our own or professional 
talent. Our officers have held monthly socials, dances and card 
parties, at which refreshments are supplied. 

Prof. W. E. Brown of Gardner conducted a course in deport- 
ment and dancing during the past winter. 

I wish to thank the follow^ing for supplying us with magazines 
and other reading matter: Mrs. Amie H. Coes, Miss Lillian 
Turner, Rev. Robert S. Cheney, Miss Augusta Bodette, Mr. C. 
S. Ruggles, Mrs. Frank Hopkins and Mrs. Turner. 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



15 



Staff. 

Dr. H. C. Barrows, assistant physician since April 1, 1908, 
ended his services May 16, 1910, entering private practice at 
Augusta, ]Me. This vacancy has been filled by Dr. Paul R. Felt 
of Hillsborough, X. H., who entered upon his duties June 13. 

Requirements. 

A cottage for 30 men. This will be built from plans of and 
practically identical with the cottage now being erected. 

A cottage for 10 married employees. This, also, will be iden- 
tical with, cottage now being built, from our own plans and by 
our own labor. 

Extension, 75 feet, of coal trestle, according to estimate of 
Boston & Maine Railroad. Excavation will be done by us. This 
is essential so that a year's supply of coal may be purchased, and 
will abolish danger of accidents by cars running down incline to 
main line track. This has happened several times and is very 
dangerous. 

Extension of water system. This consists of an additional 
pump and extension of domestic service and fire protection to 
the store and cottages for employees. 

The development and successful carrying out of the colony 
industrial plan is dependent, in a large measure, on active, inter- 
ested and loyal employees. This year, more than ever before, 
I have felt that we have many such, and I fully appreciate their 
co-operation. And to your Board I wish to express my deep 
appreciation of your continued encouragement and support. 

Respectfully submitted. 



CHAS. E. THOMPSON, 

Superintendent. 

Gakdner, Mass., Dec. 1, 1910. 



16 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



INDUSTEIAL DEPARTMENT. 



WORK 


DONE 


BY WOMEN. 




Aprons, carpenters', . 


12 


Doilies embroidered. 


20 


Aprons embroidered. 


7 


Doilies hemstitched, . 


63 


Aprons, gingham, 


361 


Drawn work: — 




Aprons, kitchen, 


48 


Bureau scarfs. 


16 


Aprons, tea, 


3 


Center pieces. 


12 


Aprons, white, waitress', 


40 


Curtains, scrim, pairs, 


4 


Bags, Christmas, 


1,297 


Doilies, .... 


16 


Bags, coffee, 


60 


Table covers. 


11 


Bags, laundrj', 


14 


Drawers, cotton. 


33 


Bags, raffia, silk-lined, 


22 


Dresses, ..... 


328 


Bandages, 


681 


Dusters, ..... 


74 


Baskets, raffia, 


128 


Garters, pairs, .... 


21 


Baskets, reed, . 


10 


Gloves, knitted, men's, pair, 


1 


Belt, abdomen. 


1 


Glove wrists, knitted, pairs, 


307 


Belts embroidered, 


4 


Handkerchiefs: — 




Belt, machine, . 


1 


Embroidered, 


29 


Bibs, .... 


18 


Hemstitched, 


183 


Bloomer suit, . 


1 


Men's, .... 


39 


Bloomers, pairs. 


2 


Hats trimmed, 


10 


Bonnet, baby's, crocheted. 


1 


Holders, 


96 


Bonnet, sun, 


1 


Jabots embroidered, . 


4 


Brass hammered piece, 


1 


Jumpers, .... 


132 


Bureau covers hemmed. 


34 


Lace crocheted, j'ards. 


5f 


Bureau covers hemstitched. 


11 


Linen woven, vards, 


9 


Burial robes, 


36 


Material woven of ra veilings, 




Canvas colored, pounds. 


5i 


yards, ..... 


12 


Caps, cordurov, 


331 


Ivlittens, canvas, pairs, 


57 


Carriage cover, canvas. 


1 


^littens, canvas and skin, pairs. 


347 


Center pieces embroidered, 


42 


Mittens, women's knitted, pair, 


1 


Center piece, Roman cutwork, 


1 


Xapkins hemmed. 


252 


Chemises 


60 


2seckties, men's. 


232 


Coats, khaki, . 


2 


Nightdresses, .... 


75 


Coats, men's outside, 


398 


Overalls, .... 


724 


Collar, Battenberg, . 


1 


Pads, sanitarj'. 


519 


Collars, Dutch, embroidered. 


20 


Pen wipers, .... 


10 


Collar and cuffs embroidered 




Pillow cases, .... 


1,464 


sets, .... 


3 


Pillows, hair, .... 


36 


Corset covers, . 


14 


Poultices made. 


132 


Corset covers embroidered. 


5 


Rags colored, pounds. 


126 


Cover for mangle. 




Rugs: — 




Cover for mattress, . 




Braided, .... 


200 


Curtain, cretoime. 




Hooked, .... 


22 


Curtain, stereopticon. 




Rope, ..... 


2 


Curtains, scrim, sash, pairs, 


41 


Sacks, baby's crocheted, 


19 


Doilies crocheted, 


9 


Shawls crocheted, 


25 


Doilies, damask, button-holed, . 


21 


Sheets hemmed. 


807 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — Xo. 70. 



17 



Shirts, hospital, 


229 


Table cloths hemmed. 


20 


Shirts, outside. 


682 . 


Table covers hemmed. 


18 


Shirtwaists, .... 


24 , 


Table mats crocheted. 


8 


Shoes stitched, men's, pairs. 


17 


Tam-o-shanters crocheted. 


3 


Shoes stitched, women's, pairs, . 


46 ' 


Ties hemstitched, women's, 


86 


Shoes, tops stitched. 


49 


Towels, . . . . . 


2,866 


Skirts, dress, .... 


3 


Tray cloths hemstitched, . 


3 


Slippers, baby's, crocheted, pairs, 


10 


Trays, raflBa, . . . . 


4 


Socks, baby's, pair, . 


1 


Trousers, . . . . 


545 


Sofa pillows, huckabuck, . 


24S 


Underdrawers, . . . . 


102 


Sofa pillow tops embroidered. 


2 


Underskirts, . . . . 


109 


Sponges made, 


lis 


Undervests, . . . . 


75 


Stockings, colored, men's, pairs. 


267 


Vests 


182 


Stockings, colored, women's. 




Wreaths, evergreen, . 


33 


pairs, .... 


2 


TTristers knitted, pairs, 


75 


Stockings toed, pairs, 


480 


Wrists stitched on mittens, pairs 


52 


Suits, combination, 


2 


Yarn spun, skeins, 


9 


Suspenders, .... 


ISO 








;Mexdixg. 




Aprons, ..... 


245 


Napkins, . . . . 


5 


Bags, coffee, .... 


12 


Nightdresses, . . . . 


731 


Bags, laundrj-. 


39 


Nightshirts, . . . . 


109 


Bands on underclothing, . 


30 


Overalls, . . . . . 


1,357 


Bed pad, .... 


1 


Pillow cases, . . . . 


61 


Bedspreads, .... 


14 


Rugs, . . , . . 


43 


Bibs, 


40 


Sheets, 


370 


Blankets, .... 


93 


Shirts, outing, . . . . 


1,876 


Bloomers, pair. 


1 


Shirtwaists, . . . . 


15 


Cap, 


1 


Shoes, . . . . . 


30 


Carpet bound with leather. 


1 


Sideboard covers. 


2 


Chemises, .... 


515 


Stockings, 


11,467 


Coats, 


1,068 


Suspenders, 


16 


Corset covers, .... 


69 


Sweater, .... 


1 


Corsets, pair, .... 


1 


Table cloths, . 


9 


Curtains, net, pairs, . 


3 


Table oilcloths. 


26 


Curtains, roller. 


23 


Tags sewed on clothing. 


193 


Doilies, table, .... 


20 


Trousers, 


1.791 


Drawers, .... 


449 


Underdrawers, . 


2,003 


Dresses. ..... 


1,7S5 


Undershirts, 


382 


Fias, times, .... 


14 


Underskirts, 


866 


Jumpers, .... 


394 


Union smts. 


12 


Mittens, pairs, 


37 


Vests, .... 


1,444 


WORK 


DOXE BY MEX. 




Baskets, bushel, 


15 


Brogans repaired — Con. 




Baskets, half-bushel. 


19 


Soles, pairs, . 


30 


Boots, felt, patched, pairs, 


63 


Tapped, pairs. 


591 


Boots, rubber, patched, pairs. 


89 


Brooms made, . 


104 


Brogans made, pairs. 


224 


Brick stays made. 


2,027 


Brogans repaired: — 




Chairs recaned: — 




Counters, pairs, 


54 


Backs, .... 


7 


Heels, pairs, .... 


639 


Seats 


6 


Innersoles, pairs, . 


155 


Mat, cocoa, 


3 


Relasted, pairs. 


20 


Mattress, 


1 



18 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 













1 800 




oO 


^ight reports, 


1,000 


kjyjXKZj^ jkjdixo, < • • • 


rtO 


OrH pr for TPrifiir^ 


5 000 


OUltro, lUUUtrl, pdlx, , , 


1 


ProgrD-nis, 


200 








1 700 


Slippers made, « , 


D 


Women's Is-undry lists. 


1,012 


Slippers repaired i — 




Sliirting wov6d, vRrds 28 


and 


\J L4.XJ. I. O , ^dllo, • ■ • 


333 


30 inches 


708^ 


X-LCv;iO, ^JCLlXOj • • • . 


514 


Shoes nitidei 




Tn r»pr«;r»l PQ TifiiTQ 

XUi-lvJX OWlv^O, ^dXlO, . . . 


348 


Iv^ en's 


67 


Xvt^XcloLcU, p<all&, . . • 




Women's, 


91 


Soles, pairs, .... 


350 


Shoes repaired: — 




Tapped, pairs. 


15 


Counters, pairs, 


47 


Stockings, machine knitted, pairs, 


719 


Heels, pairs, . 


455 


Toweling woven, 16 to 24 inches. 




Heels, rubber, pairs, 


29 


yards, ..... 


2 284 


Innersoles, pairs, . 


47 


Wrists for gloves, machine 




Patches, 


. 251 


knitted, pairs, 


25 


BLACKSIMITH AND MACHINIST. 




Angle irons made, 


6 


Knife sharpened. 


1 


Axles set. 


7 


Ladder reironed. 




Bands, etc., made, 


48 


Latch, door, made, . 


\ 


Boilers, copper, soldered, . 


3 


Lawn mowers sharpened, . 


5 


Bolts made. 


155 


Levers for brackets made, . 


15 


Braces made, . 


16 


Lock repaired, .... 




Brackets, staging. 


30 


Mangle repaired. 




Brake irons repaired, 


4 


Neck yokes ironed, . 


2 


Brakes, wagon, made, 


2 


Oxen shod, pairs. 


415^ 


Car mover repaired, . 


1 


Ox wagons repaired. 


2 


Carriage body ironed, 


1 


Ox yokes repaired. 


9 


Chain made, feet, 


21 


Painters' rings and bolts, . 


30 


Chains, cattle, repaired, 


19 


Picks resteeled. 


28 


Chains, farm, repaired. 


36 


Picks sharpened. 


402 


Chains, stake, repaired, 


2 


Pipe hangers made, . 


s 


Chairs ironed, . 


3 


Platform, motor. 


1 


Cider press ironed, 


1 


Ploughs repaired, 


5 


Clamps made, . 


6 


Poker, furnace. 


1 


Clasp for scythe made. 


1 


Potato peeler repaired. 


1 


Cle\-ices repaired. 


2 


Pulley turned, .... 


\ 


Cold chisels made. 


7 


Pump repaired. 


1 


Crowbars repaired, . 


7 


Pung reshod, .... 


1 


Crowbars sharpened, 


17 


Rings made, .... 


4 


Grindstone cut down, 


1 


Rocker plates made, 


2 


Grub hoe made. 


1 


Rods made, .... 


5 


Grub hoes sharpened, 


22 


Rods -^v^th threads and nuts. 


37 


Hangers made. 


19 


Scissors ground, 


g 


Harrows repaired. 


3 


Seat spring repaired, 


1 


Hinge made. 


1 


Sewing machines repaired. 


10 


Hooks made, . 


43 


Shafts reironed. 


6 


Hooks, rug, repointed, 


5 


Shipper, belt, made, . 


1 


Hose reel repaired, . 


1 


Sleds repaired, 


6 


Ice box lined, . 


1 


Sled runners made, . 


6 


Ice brake for sled made, 


1 


Sleighs repaired. 


4 


Ice tongs repaired. 


2 


Sleigh reshod, .... 


1 


Kneips repaired, 


3 


Snaths reironed, 


2 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUIVIENT — No. 70. 



19 



Spoons, drill, sharpened, . 


2 


Wagon pole reironed. 


1 


Stanchion ironed, 


1 


Wagon seat reironed, 


1 


Staples made, . 


8 


Wagon step made. 


1 


Stone boats ironed, . 


2 


Washing machine repaired, 


1 


Stone boat repaired, . 


1 


Wheelbarrows ironed, 


20 


Stone drag repaired, . 


1 


Whiffletrees ironed, . 


6 


Stone drills made, 


122 


Wrenches made, 


3 


Stone drills sharpened, 


513 


Plumbing at men's and women's 




Stone hammer made, 


1 


industrial buildings. 




Tires set, carriage, 


4 


Plumbing at Highland cottage. 




Tires set, wagon. 


19 


Relaying water pipe, feet, . 


3,000 


Truss rods made. 


3 


Recalking water pipe, feet. 


3,000 


Wagon bodies reironed, 


6 


Laying new pipe, feet. 


990 




CARPENTER. 




Artificial leg, . 


1 


Doors repaired. 


165 


Artificial leg repaired, 


1 


Draw bar for harrow. 


1 


Axle bed for ox cart. 


1 


Dump carts repaired. 


7 


Barn at Fairview cottage, . 


1 


Ensilage cars repaired. 


2 


Basket repaired, 


1 


Elm cottage (not completed). 




Beam for loom. 


1 


Fire door tinned. 


1 


Bobbins turned. 


24 


Floors, stable, .... 


4 


Box for caps lined, . 


1 


Forms for concrete steps, . 


3 


Box for explosives lined. 


1 


Grain shoots, .... 


2 


Box for floor oil lined. 


1 


Harrows repaired. 


2 


Boxes, bobbin. 


7 


Hen house built. 


1 


Boxes, bread, . 


3 


Highland cottage (not completed). 




Boxes, filing. 


3 


Hog troughs, .... 


8 


Boxes for photographic plates. 


3 


Ice runs made. 


3 


Boxes, ice. 


2 


Ice runs repaired. 


2 


Box, match, lined, 


1 


Industrial buildings, interior. 


2 


Boxes, switch, . 


3 


Ironing boards. 


5 


Boxes, toilet paper, . 


6 


Keys made, .... 


22 


Boxes, toilet paper repaired. 


10 


Knives ground. 


19 


Braces for looms, 


12 


Ladders repaired. 


3 


Brackets, builders', . 


12 


Locks put on, .... 


60 


Brackets, window. 


2 


Locks repaired. 


119 


Bread board, . 


1 


Milk room, 13 by 28 feet, . 


1 


Bread trough covers. 


3 


Ox cart, side boards, sets, . 


3 


Bridges, highway. 


3 


Ox yokes made, 


2 


Brushes repaired. 


2 


Patterns for castings. 


6 


Cabinet doors. 


4 


Peels made, .... 


6 


Cesspool covers, 


4 


Peels repaired, 


12 


Chairs, rocking, made, 


28 


Percolating stand, dispensary. 


1 


Chairs repaired. 


95 


Picture frames. 


51 


Chiffoniers repaired. 


4 


Plant stand, .... 


1 


Clocks repaired, 


25 


Platform for fireworks. 


1 


Closet for hardware, 8 by 8 feet, 


1 


Porches covered, 8 by 15 feet. 




Closets for industrial building. 


3 


4 by 5 feet, .... 


2 


Closets, telephone. 


2 


Posts, fence, .... 


12 


Coal trestle replanked. 


1 


Pump house roof. 


1 


Cog wheels for looms. 


2 


Pump house, wood work, . 


1 


Crossbars, wagon. 


5 


Rakes repaired. 


2 


Doors, inside, . 


5 


Roller shades repaired. 


33 


Doors, outside. 


2 


Rolling pin handles turned. 


3 


Door, stable, . 


1 


Rolling pins turned, . 


3 



20 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



Rug frames, 


5 


Tables made, . . . . 


16 


Saws filed. 


58 


Tables repaired. 


12 


Scissors sharpened, pairs, . 


73 


Tank, milk cooling. 


1 


Screen doors. 


8 


Temporary attic finished, 


I 


Screens made, . 


71 


Temporary house for masons 


1 


Settees repaired, 


50 


Tent floor, 15 by 18 feet. 


1 


Sewing machines repaired, 


3 


Tool rack, . . . . 


1 


Shanks for shoes, 


1,000 


Towel rack. 


I 


Sheep barn, interior remodeled, 


1 


Trap door, . . . . 


1 


Shed shingled, . 


1 


Trestles, . . . . . 


12 


Shelves made, 


10 


Vegetable storage room. 


1 


Shovels repaired, 


12 


T\'agon remade. 


1 


Sleds repaired, 


9 


Wagon poles, . . . . 


7 


Sled rocker made, 


1 


Wagon seats, . . . . 


2 


Sleighs repaired. 


4 


Wagon wheels, rims. 


6 


Spokes in wheels. 


2 


Wagons repaired. 


11 


Stakes, grade, . 


150 


Washboard, . . , . 


1 


Stanchions remade, . 


2 


Well curbs, . . . . 


2 


Stanchions repaired. 


10 


T\'heelbarrows remade, 


69 


Stone boats replanked, 


50 


Whiffletrees made. 


15 


Stool, piano, repaired. 


1 


WJjjp stocks. 


2 


Stools, milking. 


8 


Window guards repaired, . 


12 


Stools, milking, repaired, . 


8 


Window seat, . . . . 


1 


Summer house. 


1 


Windows repaired. 


94 


Swabs made. 


12 


Woodshed, 15 hy 50 feet, . 


1 


Switchboard made, . 


1 


Woodwork, vegetable cellars. 


3 


FURNITURE DEPARTMENT. 




Basket, laundrj", made. 


1 


Chairs repaired, 


57 


Bench, work, 32 feet. 


1 


Chair rounds made, . 




Benches made, 27 feet, 


2 


Circular saws filed, . 


3 


Billiard cues, . 


11 


Clock support, 


1 


Boring machine pattern. 


7 


Leather rack made, . 


1 


Boring machine table. 


1 


Pictures framed. 


39 


Broom handles made, 


30 


Saw bench patterns, 


2 


Cash drawer made, . 


1 


Settees repaired, 


5 


Chair arms made, 


2 


Shipper, boring machine, . 


1 


Chair caning benches, 


2 


Stepladder repaired, . 


1 


Chair patterns. 


2 


Stools made, . . . . 


12 


Chair press, 


1 


Stretchers, chair, 


50 


Chairs, large mission rocking, 


12 


Tables, oak dining, . 


Q 
O 


Chairs, large rattan rocking. 


11 


Tables repaired. 


3 


Chairs, mission, dining, 


61 


Towel rack made. 


1 


Chairs recaned: — 




Vice jaws, , . . . 


6 


Backs, 


38 






Seats, .... 


40 








MASON. 




Brick work: — 




Brick work — Con. 




Boilers repaired, 


6 


Chimneys built. 


4 


Brick laid, red. 


.65,000 


Chimneys repaired. 


2 


Brick laid, fire, 


. 2,000 I 


Cold-air boxes built, 


2 


Brick relaid, 


. 3,000 i 


Manholes built. 


2 


Clean-outs built, . 


8 i 


Piers biiilt, .... 


15 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 21 



Cement work: — 




Pointing: — 




Cellars cemented, . 


3 


Brick walls, .... 


4 


Chimney caps made, 


8 


Cellars, . . . . 


8 


Door caps made, . 


4 


Reinforced concrete, cubic feet, 


2,148 


Door sills made, 


4 


Silos (outside), 


2 


Rooms cemented, . 


4 


Stone work: — 




Roofs made. 


2 


Cellars, 2 mortar walls, square 




SUos cemented. 


2 


feet, .... 


12,960 


Steps made, flights, 


4 


Cesspools, cubic feet, 


5,500 


Window caps made. 


46 


Chimney, cobblestone, cubic 




Window sills made. 


46 


feet, ..... 


1,980 


Miscellaneous : — 




Dry walls, cubic feet. 


1,500 


Blasting, days. 


8 


Elm cottage, cobble stone, cubic 




Bread box repaired. 


1 


feet, ..... 


7,968 


Cement curb, cubic feet, 


120 


Fireplace, cobble stone, cubic 




Culverts, foundation, 


2 


feet, . . . ■ . 


672 


Door stoned up, 


1 


TT* 1^1 J i-J. "L "L 1 J. 

Highland cottage, cobble stone. 




Engine bed foundation, . 


1 


cubic feet. 


10,584 


Fireplace repaired, 


1 


Industrial buildings (2), cobble 




Holes cut in wall, . 


8 


stone, cubic feet. 


7,968 


Holes drilled in walls. 


16 


Milk house, mortar walls. 




Ranges repaired, . 


2 


square feet, 


736 


Tile pipes laid, feet, 


675 


Pump house, cobble stone, cu- 




Ventilators put in, 


2 


bic feet, .... 


2,880 


Window stoned up. 


1 


Well, cubic feet. 


240 


Plastering: — 








Buildings, square yards. 


1.660 






IVTilV TrmmQ Qmiarp vnT^H^ 


200 






Patches put on, 


20 








PAINTER. 




Bake ovens painted, . 


2 


Doors, screen, painted. 


9 


Bath tubs enameled. 


2 


Doors, storm, painted. 


2 


Beds enameled. 


136 


Fire escapes painted. 


2 


Bedside tables painted. 


5 


Floors oiled, .... 


15 


Boxes, bread, painted. 


2 


Floors painted. 


7 


Boxes, card index, varnished, 


2 


Floors stained. 


5 


Boxes, ice, painted, . 


2 


Floors varnished. 


6 


Boxes, miscellaneous, painted, . 


9 


Flower stand varnished. 


1 


Boxes, napkin, varnished, . 


3 


Glass lights set. 


190 


Buildings painted, inside, . 


6 


Kettles painted, 


10 


Buildings painted, outside, 


13 


Kitchen cabinet varnished, 


1 


Cabinets varnished, . 


10 


Loom varnished, 


1 


Carriages painted and varnished, 


7 


Milk cooler painted, 


1 


Carts painted and varnished. 


3 


Piazzas oiled, .... 


4 


Ceilings whitened, 


41 


Picture frames varnished, . 


51 


Chairs varnished. 


325 


Rooms painted, 


12 


Desks varnished, 


4 


Sinks painted, .... 


7 


Doors revarnished, . 


27 1 


Storm windows painted, 


12 



DOMESTIC DEPARTMENT. 

Manufactured. 



Soap, hard, pounds, 
Soap, soft, pounds, 



195 
5,920 



22 



GARDNER STATE COLOXIl'. 



^Dec. 



Pickles, Pkesertbs, etc. 



Apple jdly, quarts. . 


15 


Peas, quarts, . . . . 


74 


Beans, staring, canned, quarts. 


M 


Piccalilli, gallons. 


1071 


Beans, string, salted, gallons. 


450 


Pickles, mixed, gallons. 


37 


Blackberries, quarts. 


. 216 


Pickles, mustard, gallons. 


23 


Blackberry jam. quarts. 


20 


Pickles, salted, gaUons, 


SS4 


Blackberry pickle, quarts, . 


16 


Pickles, sliced tomato, gallons, . 


137 


Blueberries, quarts, . 


. 1.392 


Pickles, sweet, gallons. 


20 


Cherries, quarts. 


192 


Pickles, vinegar, gallons. 


34 


Chili sauce, quarts, . 


IS 


Pumpkins, quarts. 


6 


Citron, quarts. 


122 


Quince, quarts. 


39 


Danddion greens, quarts. . 


30 


Quince jelly, quart, . 


1 


Grape jam, quarts. 


22 


Quince and apple, quarts, . 


8 


Grape jelly, quarts. . 




Radishes, quarts. 


12 


Grapes, spiced, quarts. 


6 


Raspberries, quarts, . 


3S 


Peaches, quarts. 


74 


Strawberries, quarts. 


24 


Pears, quarts, . 


186 


Tomatoes, canned, quarts. 


34 


Pears, spiced, quarts. 


45 


Tomato and pear, quarts, . 


4 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



PRODUCTS OF FARM, BY COLONIES. 



Belcher Cottage. 



Apples, barrels, 54^, at $3, . . . 


. $163 50 


Beans, dry, bushels, S^o, at $2.25, 


7 01 


Beans, string, bushels, llOH, at $0.75, 


83 19 


Beet greens, bushels, 15, at S0.35, 


5 25 


Beets, bushels, 66|, at $0.60, . 


39 90 


Blackberries, quarts, -iO, at $0.10, 


4 00 


Blueberries, quarts, 200, at $0.10, 


20 00 


Brussel sprouts, quarts, 292, at $0.11, 


32 12 


Cabbage, tons, 4f , at $10, 


43 75 


Carrots, bushels, 66^ at S0.60, . 


39 90 


Cherries, quarts, 26, at $0.10, . 


2 60 


Chicken, pounds. 31, at $0.24, . 


7 44 


Cord wood, cords, 51, at $4.50, . 


229 50 


Com, green, bushels, 140^, at $0.75, . 


105 38 


Cucumbers, boxes, 25|, at $1.50, 


37 75 


Cucumbers, pickling, pecks, 4§, at $0.75, 


3 38 


Duck, pounds, 5^, at $0.16, 


84 


Eggs, dozen, 367i*2, at $0.30, . 


110 32 


Ensilage corn, tons, 200, at $5, . 


1,000 00 


Fodder, clover, tons, 6, at $21, . 


126 00 


Fodder, oats and pease, tons, 22 at $5, 


110 00 


Fodder, vye, tons, 20, at $5, 


100 00 


Fowl, pounds, 13^ at $0.18, 


2 38 


Hay, English, tons, 31, at $21, . 


651 00 


Lettuce, boxes, 6^, at $0.75, 


4 87 


Maniu-e, cords, 195, at $5, 


975 00 


Manure, hen, barrels, 8, at $1, . 


8 00 


Maple sjTiip, gallons, 14|, at $1, 


14 25 


Onions, bushel, 1, at $0.85, 


85 


Parsnips, bushels. 17^ at $1, . 


17 50 


Pears, bushels, 2h, at $1.75. 


4 37 


Pease, green, bushels, 13^. at $1, 


13 50 


Potatoes, bushels, 217. at $0.70, 


151 90 


Pumpkins, pounds. 3.900, at $0.03, . 


117 00 


PUdishes, dozen bunches, 94^ at $0.25, 


23 58 


Rhubarb, pounds, 15. at $0.02, . . 


30 


Amount carried forward, 


. $4,256 33 



24 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



Amount brought forward, 


. S4,256 


33 


Rye, bushels, 291, at S0.90, 


26 


77 


Rye straw, tons, 2\, at S24, 


60 


00 


Scullions, bushels, at S0.75, . 


3 


37 


Spinach, bushels, 7, at S0.40, 


2 


80 


Squash, summer, tons, l^f, at 820, 


36 


25 


Squash, winter, tons, lio, at S30, 


57 


00 


Strawberries, quarts, 8, at SO. 10, 




80 


Tomatoes, green, bushels, 2^, at SO.. 50, 


1 


25 


Turkey, pounds, 98^ at S0.22, . 


21 


67 


Turnip greens, bushels, 19, at S0.35, . 


6 


65 


Turnips, ruta baga, barrels, 143t, at $1.25, 


179 


00 


Turnips, white egg, barrels, 134t, at SI. 25, 


168 


00 


Fairview Cottage. 






Beans, shell, bushels, Ij, at 81.25, 


81 


56 


Beans, string, bushels, 5, at 80.75, 


3 


75 


Beet greens, bushels, 4|, at 80.35, 


1 


58 


Beets, bushels, 7i at 80.60. 


4 


35 


Blackberries, quarts, 75, at 80.10. 


7 


50 


Blueberries, quarts, 112, at 80.10, 


11 


20 


Butter, pounds, 446f , at 80.29, . 


129 


56 


Cabbage, pounds, 375, at 810 ton. 


1 


88 


Celery, boxes, 2tV, at SI, . 


2 


80 


Cherries, quarts, 21, at 80.10, . 


2 


10 


Com, green, bushels, 4, at 80.75, 


3 


00 


Cucumbers, boxes, 7, at 81.50, . 


10 


50 


Lettuce, boxes, 3^, at 80.75, 


2 


63 


Pease, green, bushels, 4^, at 81, 


4 


50 


Pumpkins, pounds, 55, at 80.03, 


1 


65 


RacUshes, dozen bunches, 5, at 80.25, 


1 


25 


Raspberries, quarts, 13, at 80.20, 


2 


60 


Squash, summer, tons, sV, at 820, 




67 


Squash, winter, pounds, 312, at 830 ton, 


4 


68 


Tomatoes, green, bushels, 4^, at 80.50, 


2 


25 


Turnips, bushels, 4, at 80.50, . 


2 


00 


G-iRDEx AT Receiving Group. 




Beans, shell, bushels, 44^, at 81.25, . 


855 63 


Beans, string, bushels, 28^, at 80.75, . 


21 


38 


Beet greens, bushels, 8, at 80.35, 


2 


80 



S4,S19 89 



202 01 



Amounts carried forward, 



$79 81 85,021 90 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 70. 



25 



Amounts brought forward, . . . . 


S79 


81 


Beets, bushels, 33, at S0.60, .... 


19 


80 


Blackberries, quarts, 101, at SO. 10, 


10 


10 


Blueberries, quarts, 1,156, at SO.IO, . 


115 


60 


Cabbage, tons, 32o, at $10, .... 


34 


50 


Carrots, bushels, 62, at S0.60, . ... 


37 


20 


Cauliflower, boxes, Ito, at SI, . 


1 


40 


Celery, boxes, 16t2, at SI, 


16 


42 


Chard, bushels, 2/, at S0.3o, . . . . 


9 


45 


Citron, crates, 2, at 81.75, .... 


3 


50 


Cucumbers, boxes, 13t, at Sl.oO, 


20 


63 


Ensilage com, tons, 2, at S5, . 


10 


00 


Kale, bushels, / 8, at SO. 30, .... 


23 


40 


Kohlrabi, bushels, 1, at SO.oO, .... 




50 


Lettuce, boxes, 93|, at SO./o, .... 


70 


25 


Mushrooms, pounds, 7, at SO. 75, 


5 


25 


Onions, bushels, 2, at S0,8o, .... 


1 

1 


TA 


Parsmps, bushels, 2, at SI, ... . 


2 


00 


Pease, green, bushels, lo, at SI, 


15 


00 


Potatoes, bushels, 424, at .SU./O, 


29o 


C A 

80 


Pumpkins, pounds, 2,000, at .80.03, 


A 

dO 


AA 

00 


Radishes, dozen bunches. If, at b0.2o. 




44 


Rhubarb, pounds, 16^, at S0.02, 




33 


Squash, summer, tons, \, at S20, 


5 


AA 
00 


Squash, winter, tons, ^V, at S30, 


10 


50 


iomatoes, green, bushels, 31, at SO.oO, 


lo 


"A 

oO 


Tomatoes, ripe, bushels, 12^, at .SO. 75, 


9 


37 


xurmp greens, uubueib, o, dL oyj.oD, 


1 
1 


uo 


Turnins barrel^ 5*^* at SI '^5 


65 


75 








Apples, barrels, 12t, at S3, .... 


S37 20 


Beans, dry, bushel, 1, at S2.2o, .... 


2 25 


Beans, lima, bushels, 1, at -SO. 50, 




50 


Beans, shell, bushels, 1^, at S1.2o, 


1 


56 


Beans, string, green, bushels, 10^, at SO./o, 


7 


88 


Beans, stnng, wax, bushels, 66, at S0.7o, 


49 50 


Beets, bushels, 22.3, at bU.bO, .... 


133 


80 


Blackberries, quarts, 35, at -SO.IO, 


3 


50 


Blueberries, quarts, 1,198 at -SO.IO, . 


119 80 


Cabbage, tons, 211, at SIO, .... 


26 50 


Carrots, bushels, 488, at S0.60, .... 


292 80 



S5,021 90 



941 24 



Amounts carried forward, 



S675 29 S5,963 14 



26 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



Amounts brought forward, . 

Celery, boxes, 19, at $1, . 
Cherries, quarts, 131, at SO.IO, . 
Cord wood, cords, 104, at $4.50, 
Corn, green, bushels, 137f , at $0.75, . 
Corn, whole, bushels, 150, at $0.75, . 
Cucumbers, boxes, 23f, at $1.50, 
Cucumbers, pickling, pecks, 356, at $0.75, . 
Eggs, dozen, 2021^2, at $0.30, . 
Ensilage corn, tons, 25, at $5, . 
Fodder, barley, ton, 1, at $5, 
Fodder, cabbage, ton, 1, at $5, . 
Fodder, corn, tons, 10 at $5, . 
Fodder, pease, ton, 1, at $5, 
Hay, tons, 8, at $21, 

Ice, tons, 40, at $3, 

Lettuce, boxes, 73, at $0.75, 
Mangel wurzels, bushels, 132, at $0.25, 
Manure, cords, 46, at $5, . 
Manure, hen, barrels, 6, at $1, . 
Milk, quarts, 15,114, at $0.06, . 
Onions, bushels, 108, at $0.85, . 
Pease, green, bushels, 42|, at $1, 
Pork, pounds, 314, at $0.10, 
Potatoes, bushels, 799, at $0.70, 
Pumpkins, pounds, 16,000, at $0.03, . 
Radishes, dozen bunches, 1,156, at $0.25, . 
Raspberries, quarts, 3|, at $0.20, 
Scullions, bushels, 75, at $0.75, . 
Spinach, bushels, 12, at $0.40, . 
Squash, summer, tons, 2, at $20, 
Squash, winter, tons, 7, at $30, . 
Tomatoes, green, bushels, 50, at $0.50, 
Turnip greens, bushels, 139, at $0.35, 
Turnips, barrels, 466, at $1.25, . 

HiLLCREST Camp. 
Apples, barrels, 77f , at $3, . . . 
Beans, dry, bushels, 2|, at $2.25, 
Beans, lima, bushels, 3, at $0.50, 
Beans, shell, bushels, 7f, at $1.25, 
Beans, string, bushels, 18|, at $0.75, . 



$675 29 $5,963 14 

19 00 

13 10 
468 00 
103 25 
112 50 

35 64 
267 00 

60 82 
125 00 
5 00 
5 00 

50 00 

5 00 
168 00 
120 00 

54 75 
33 00 
230 00 

6 00 
906 84 

91 80 

42 50 

31 40 
559 30 
480 00 
289 00 
70 

56 25 
4 80 

40 00 
210 00 

25 00 

48 65 
582 50 
5,925 09 



$232 13 
6 47 
1 50 
9 68 
13 75 



Amounts carried forward, 



$263 53 $11,888 23 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



27 



Amounts brought forward, 



$263 53 SI 1,888 23 



Beets, bushels, 4, at $0.60, 
Blackberries, boxes, 31, at SO. 10, 
Blueberries, quarts, 86|, at SO. 10, 
Cabbage, tons, 2^%, at SIO, 
Carrots, bushels, 24, at S0.60, . 
Cherries, quarts, 197, at SO. 10, . 
Cucumbers, table, boxes, 30|, at SI. 50, 
Cucumbers, pickling, pecks, 6|, at SO. 75, 
Dandelions, bushels, 3^, at S0.75, 
Ensilage corn, tons, 30, at S5, 
Grapes, pounds, 71, at SO. 03, 
Hay, tons, 41^0, at S21, . 
Lettuce, boxes, 36^, at $0.75, 
Manure, cord, 1, at S5, 
Milk, quarts, 2,297, at S0.06, 
Peaches, baskets, 1|, at SI, 
Pears, bushels, 7§, at SI. 75, 
Potatoes, bushels, 1,452, at S0.70, 
Pease, green, bushels, llf, at SI, 
Radishes, dozen bunches, 23|, at S0.25, 
Raspberries, quarts, 16, at SO. 20, 
Squash, summer, tons, 1^^, at S20, 
Strawberries, quarts, 7, at SIO, . 
Tomatoes, green, bushels, 4^, at SO. 50, 
Tomatoes, ripe, bushels, 1, at S0.75, . 
Turnip greens, bushels, 47f , at S0.35, 
Turnips, ruta baga, barrels, 89, at SI. 25, 
Turnips, white egg, barrels, 12|, at SI. 25, 



2 40 

3 10 
8 65 

20 75 
14 40 
19 70 
46 25 

4 87 
2 63 

150 00 

2 13 
102 90 

27 38 

5 00 
137 82 

1 50 
13 13 

1,016 40 
11 75 
5 79 

3 20 
33 00 

70 

2 25 
75 

16 71 
111 25 
16 00 



2,043 94 



Valley Farm Cottages 
Apples, barrels, 73, at S3, 
Beans, shell, bushels, 28, at SI. 25, 
Beans, string, 49^, at S0.75, 
Beets, bushels, 175, at S0.60, . 
Blackberries, quarts, 100, at SO. 10, 
Blueberries, quarts, 150, at SO.IO, 
Cabbage, ton, ^, at SIO, . 
Carrots, bushels, 30, at S0.60, 
Cauliflower, box, 1, at SI, 
Celer}^, boxes, 6f, at SI, . 
Cherries, quarts, 20, at SO.IO, 



$219 00 
35 00 
37 12 
105 00 
10 00 
15 00 

5 00 
18 00 

1 00 

6 75 

2 00 



Amounts carried forward, .... $453 87 S13,932 17 



28 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



Amounts brought forward, . 

Chicken, pounds, 162f , at $0.24, 
Cord wood, cords, 75, at $4.50, . 
Corn, green, bushels, 74j, at $0.75, 
Corn, whole, bushels, 35|, at $0.75, . 
Cranberries, quarts, 12, at $0.10, 
Cucumbers, boxes, 17f, at $1.50, 
Eggs, dozen, 1,467,^2, at $0.30, . 
Ensilage corn, tons, 50, at $5, . 
Fodder oats, tons, 44, at $5, 
Fodder, corn, tons, 3, at $5, . 
Fodder, millet, tons, 1, at $5, . 
Fodder, barley, tons, 5, at $5, . 
Fowl, pounds, 179^ at $0.18, . 
Garhc, bushels, 2, at $0.85, 
Grapes, pounds, 60, at $0.03, 
Hay, tons, 10, at $21, 
Hay, meadow, tons, 6, at $12, . 
Lettuce, boxes, 59, at $0.75, 
Mangel wurzels, bushels, 80, at $0.25, 
Manure, cords, 40, at $5, . 
Manure, hen, barrels, 35, at $1, 
Milk, quarts, 7,766, at $0.06, . 
Onions, bushels, 150f , at $0.85, 
'Parsnips, bushels, 125, at $1, . 
Pears, bushels, 3, at $1.75, 
Peaches, baskets, 2, at $1, 
Pease, green, bushels, 6|, at $1, 
Potatoes, bushels, 500, at $0.70, 
Pumpkins, tons, 2, at $0.03 per pound. 
Radishes, dozen bunches, 175, at $0.25, 
Raspberries, quarts, 12, at $.020, 
Rowen, tons, I, at $21, .... 
Scullions, bushels, 38^, at $0.75, 
Spinach, bushels, 2^, at $0.40, . 
Squash, summer, pounds, 750, at $20 per ton. 
Squash, winter, tons, 5^, at $30, 
Tomatoes, green, bushels, 15, at $0.50, 
Tomatoes, ripe, bushels, 3|, at $0.75, 
Turnips, flat, barrels, 12, at $1.25, 
Turnips, Swedish, barrels, 68, at $1.25, 
Turnips, white, barrels, 170f , at $1.25, 



$453 87 $13,932 17 

39 06 

337 50 

55 69 

26 63 

1 20 

26 62 

440 28 

250 00 

220 00 

15 00 

5 00 

25 00 

32 31 

1 70 

1 80 
210 00 

72 00 

44 25 

20 00 

200 00 

35 00 

465 96 

128 14 

125 00 

5 25 

2 00 

6 25 
350 00 
120 00 

43 75 

2 40 

5 25 

28 69 

1 00 

7 50 
165 00 

7 50 

2 63 
15 00 
85 00 

213 33 
4,292 56 



Amount carried forward, 



$18,224 73 



1930.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



29 



Amount brought forward, ...... $18,224 73 

Westminster Cottages. 



Apples, barrels, 97, at $3, .... $291 00 

Asparagus, boxes, 1^^, at $4.50, . . . 4 75 

Beans, dry, bushels, 18, at $2.25, . . . 40 50 

Beans, shell, bushels, 6^ at $1.25, . . . 8 13 

Beans, string, bushels, 49i, at $0.75, . . . 37 12 

Beets, bushels, 111^ at $0.60, . . . . 66 90 

Blackberries, quarts, 110, at $0.10, . . . 1100 

Blueberries, quarts, 925, at $0.10, . . . 92 50 

Cabbage, tons, 6f , at $10, . . . . 67 50 

Carrots, bushels, 205i at $0.60, ... 123 15 

Cider, gallons, 360, at $0.10, . . . . 36 00 

Cord wood, cords, 75, at $4.50, . . . . 337 50 

Corn, green, bushels, 92, at $0.75, ... 69 00 

Corn, whole, bushels, 5, at $0.75, . . . 3 75 

Cucumbers, boxes, 32, at $1.50, . . . 48 00 

Cucumbers, pickling, pecks, 56, at $0.75, . . 42 00 

Eggs, dozens, 594^^, at $0.30, . . . . 178 23 

Ensilage corn, tons, 55, at $5, . . . . 275 00 

Fodder, barley, ton, |, at $5, . . . . 2 50 

Fodder, corn, green, tons, 12, at $5, . . . 60 00 

Fodder, millet, tons, 9, at $5, . . . . 45 00 

Fodder, barley, oats and pease, tons, 11^, at $5, . 57 50 

Fodder, rye, tons, 4, at $5, . . . . 20 00 

Fowl, pounds, 153f, at $0.18, . . . . 27 68 

Grapes, pounds, 132, at $0.03, .... 3 96 

Hay, tons, 12, at $21, 252 00 

Ice, tons, 55, at $3, 165 00 

Lettuce, boxes, 37, at $0.75, .... 27 75 

Mangel wurzels, bushels, 93, at $0.25, . . 23 25 

Manure, cords, 30, at $5, 150 00 

Manure, hen, barrels, 12, at $1, ... 12 00 

Mill^, quarts, 15,672, at $0.06, . . . . 940 32 

Muskmelons, crate, 1, at $1.75, . . . . 1 75 

Onions, bushels, 59, at $0.85, .... 50 15 

Oyster plant, bushels, 6, at $1, . . . . 6 00 

Parsnips, bushels, 40, at $1, . . . . 40 00 

Pears, bushels, 6, at $1.75, .... 10 50 

Pease, green, bushels, 25, at $1, . . . . 25 00 

Pork, pounds, 729, at $10, . . . . 72 90 

Potatoes, bushels, 492, at $0.70, ... 344 40 



Amounts carried forward, 



$4,069 69 $18,224 73 



30 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



Amounts brought forward, . . . . ^,069 69 $18,224 73 



Pumpkins, pounds, 2,000, at S0.03, . 


60 00 


Radishes, dozen bunches, 8^, at S0.25, 


2 13 


Raspberries, quarts, 17, at SO. 20, 


3 40 


Rhubarb, pounds, 125, at SO. 02, 


2 50 


Squash, winter, ton, 1, at S30, .... 


30 00 


Scullions, bushels, 15^, at SO. 75, 


11 63 


Stakes, fence, 200, at SIO, .... 


20 00 


Strawberries, quarts, 530, at SO. 10. 


53 00 


Telephone poles, 25, at S4. 


100 00 


Tomatoes, green, bushels, Ah, at SO. 50, 


2 25 


Tomatoes, ripe, bushels, 1^, at SO. 75, 


1 13 


Turnips, flat top, barrels, 63, at SI. 25, 


78 75 


Turnips, ruta baga, barrels, 57, at SI. 25, 


71 25 


Turnips, white egg, barrels, 18, at SI. 25, 


22 50 


Watermelons, 25, at S15 per 100, 


3 75 


General. 




Pork, pounds, 4,796. at SO. 10, .... 


S479 60 


Slabs, cords, 10, at S2 


20 00 


Sawdust, cords, 8, at SO. 75, .... 


6 00 


Beef, pounds, 2,185, at S0.07, .... 


152 95 


Lamb, pounds, 63, at SO. 11, .... 


6 93 


Milk, quans, 68,334, at S0.06, .... 


4,100 04 


Mutton, pounds, 805, at SO.ll, .... 


88 55 


Yeal, pounds, 951, at SO.ll, .... 


104 61 


Wool, pounds, 167, at $0.25, .... 


41 75 


Stone crushed, tons. 500. at SO. 50. 


250 00 


Calves, sold, 4, at SI. 


4 00 


Hides, .skins, etc., ...... 


53 73 


Pigs sold, 2, at $4, 


8 00 


Guinea pigs sold, 44, at SO. 25, . 


11 00 


Ice, tons, 401, at S3, 


1.203 00 


Lumber, pine, hemlock and spruce. 43,000 feet. 




at S16, 


688 00 


Lumber, chestnut, ash, maple and birch, 12,000 




feet, at S28, 


336 00 



4,531 98 



7,554 16 



Total farm products, 830,310 87 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 31 

Live Stock. 

Horses, 15, $3,332 00 

Cows, 61, at $50, 3,050 00 

Heifers (two years), 9, at $30, 270 00 

Heifers (one year), 8, at $20, 160 00 

Steers (three years), 4, at $50, 200 00 

Steers (two years), 4, at $37.50, 150 00 

Steers (one year), 5, at $25, 125 00 

Bulls, 3, ' . . 250 00 

Calves, 12, . . . 200 00 

Oxen, 12, 950 00 

Sheep, 20, 120 00 

Lambs, 6, 20 00 

Ram, 1, 30 00 

Hogs, 29, at $18, 522 00 

Shotes, 55, at $8, 440 00 

Pigs, 9, at $2.50, 22 50 

Hens, 278, at $0.75, 207 50 

Pullets, 205, at $0.50, . . . . . . . 102 50 

Roosters, 114, at $0.50, 57 00 

Guinea hens, 9, at $1, . . . . . . . 9 00 

Ducks, 7, at $1, . . . . - . . . . 7 00 

Guinea pigs, 300, at $0.15, 45 00 



$10,269 50 



32 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



VALUATION. 



Real Estate. 



Land, 1,603.51 acres, . . • . 


. $26,950 


00 


Water supply. 


. 27,594 


11 


Water tower, ..... 


. 7,716 


40 


Drainage system, ..... 


. 20,539 


54 


Heating system, ..... 


. 9,737 


20 


Lighting system, ..... 


. 12,335 


16 


Power system, ..... 


. 5,898 


14 


Telephone system, ..... 


1,255 


40 


Administration Building, 


. 36,120 


81 


Belcher cottage, . . . . 


. 8,000 


00 


Belcher barns, shed and hen house, . 


. 15,374 


77 


Catalpa cottage, ..... 


. 3,049 


62 


Domestic building, .... 


. 45,535 


47 


Elm cottage (under construction), . 


. 3,348 


96 


Fairview cottage and barn. 


. 2,337 


68 


Gardner cottages, ..... 


. 44,196 


84 


Gardner barn, silo and hen house. 


. 4,476 


92 


Green house (under construction), . 


460 


86 


Highland cottage (under construction), 


. 9,623 


47 


Hose house, ...... 


1,UUU 


r\r\ 
UU 


Ice house, ...... 


. 2,538 


41 


Maple cottage, ..... 


4,892 


22 


Mechanics' building, .... 


. 4,869 


64 


Men's industrial building, 


. 6,500 


00 


Men's receiving ward, . . . 


. 47,949 


00 


Old buildings, ..... 


1,500 


00 


Paint shop, ...... 


709 


50 


Power house, ..... 


. 13,875 


71 


Pump houses (5), . 


705 


00 


Stone crushing plant and sawmill, 


. 2,799 


29 


Storage cellars, ..... 


. 4,000 


00 


Storehouse, ...... 


7,218 


00 


Valley farm cottage, barn and sheds. 


3,938 


33 


Valley farm annex and barn, . 


5,002 


00 


Amount carried forward, . 


$392,048 


27 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — Xo. 70. 33 



Amount brought forward , . 


S392,048 


27 


Westminster cottages, .... 


47,612 


19 


Westminster bam, silo and hen house, 


4,076 


19 


Women's industrial building, . 


6,500 


00 


U omen s receding ward. 


57,740 


00 


Persoxal Property. 








•S2.S74 


68 


Clnthinof anH olnthinc mflfprial 

XVy l.-LLXXi.cL CXi-LVX V.XV^ V. l~LXXXg 1 1 lO L\^XXCXX, 


14,212 


05 


Ti'n m 1 5 V) 1 n ore 

J. LXi IXi-0 1 1 i 1 i^o, ...... 




( o 


TTpot liirViT and nnwpr' — 






Fuel, 


402 


93 


All nfnPT ■nrnnpffv 

11 SJLJLlCi Ll^Ci , • 




IS 


T?pr\{nr<2 inri TnTr»'rr»'VPmPTif 5 • 

ilC^ctxlo cU-lU. llll^x U > CilxCilLo . 






^lachinerv and mechanical fixtures, 


2,825 


69 


All other propertv, 


6,317 


00 


Farm stable and oronnds" — 






Live stock on the farm, 


10,269 


50 


Produce of the farm on hand. 


9,357 


45 


Carriages and agricultural implements. 


4,552 


06 


Fire apparatus, .... 


804 


56 


All other property, .... 


3,217 


82 


Miscellaneous, ..... 


5,015 


52 



95,724 17 



Total real and personal property. 



§603,700 82 



34 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Gardner State Colony. 

I respectfully submit the following report of the finances of this 
institution for the fiscal year ending Nov. 30, 1910: — 



Balance Dec. 1, 1909, 



Cash Account. 



$2,395 91 



Receipts. 



Institution Receipts. 
Board of inmates: — 

Reimbursements, 
Salaries, wages and labor: — 

Wages not called for, . 
Sales : — 

Food, 

Clothing and materials. 

Furnishings, 

Heat, light and power, 

Repairs and improvements, 

Miscellaneous, 

Farm, stable and grounds: — 
Cows and calves, 
Pigs and hogs. 
Hides, 

Ice, .... 
Sundries, 

Miscellaneous receipts : — 

Interest on bank balances, 
Industries, . 



$27 55 
214 17 

3 51 
21 48 

7 10 
51 39 



$4 00 
8 00 

53 73 
5 20 

32 96 



$143 08 
160 69 



Receipts from Treasury of Commonwealth. 
Maintenance appropriations: — 

Advance money (amount on hand November 30) , 
Approved schedules of 1910, 



$1,877 82 
1 96 



325 20 



103 89 



303 77 



$5,000 00 
111.216 19 



Special appropriations, 



2.612 64 



116,216 19 
25.666 02 



Total, 



$146,890 76 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — 



Xo. 70. 



35 



Payments. 

To treasury of Commonwealth, institution receipts, S2,612 64 

Maintenance appropriations : — 

Balance November schedule, 1909, . . 2,395 91 

Eleven months schedules, 1910, . . . 111,216 19 

November advances, ..... 1,465 76 

S117,690 50 

Special appropriations : — 

Approved schedules, 25,666 02 

Balance, Nov. 30, 1910: — 

In bank, S3, 110 67 

In office 423 57 

3,534 24 



Total, . §146,890 76 



Maintenance. 



Appropriation, . 

Expenses (as analyzed below), 



$116,500 00 
116,500 00 



Analysis of Expenses 

Salaries, wages and labor: — 
General administration, 
Medical service, . 
Ward service (male), . 
Ward service (female), 
Repairs and improvements 
Farm, stable and grounds, 



Food: — 
Butter, 
Butterine, . 
Beans, 

Bread and crackers, 

Cereals, rice, meal, etc. 

Cheese, 

Eggs, 

Flour, 

Fish, . 

Fruit (dried and fresh) 
Meats, 

Molasses and syrup. 
Sugar, 

Tea, coffee, broma and 

Vegetables, 

Sundries, 



Clothing and materials: — 
Boots, shoes and rubbers. 
Clothing, ...... 

Dry goods for clothing and small wares, 



S15,407 61 
4,507 70 
11,093 31 
4,005 88 
3,996 47 
3,380 67 



$814 32 
1,742 81 

512 83 
228 15 
755 93 
104 26 
118 80 

5,396 79 

1,247 92 
224 54 

5,868 36 
97 73 

1,391 75 
512 78 
260 37 

1,178 33 



S358 89 
110 67 
3,495 76 



842,391 64 



20,455 67 



Amounts carried forward, 



S3,965 32 



§62,847 31 



36 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



Amounts brought forward. 



$3,96o 32 $62,847 31 



Clothing and materials — Con. 
Furnishing goods, 
Hats and caps. 
Leather and shoe findings, 
Sundries, .... 

Furnishings: — 

Beds, bedding, table linen, etc., 

Brushes, brooms. 

Carpets, rugs, etc.. 

Crockery, glassware. cutler\-, etc.. 

Furniture and upholsterj-. 

Kitchen furnishings, 

Wooden ware, buckets, pails, etc., 

Sundries, .... 



Heat, light and power 
Coal, 

Freight on coal, 
Electricity, 
Gas, . 
Oil, . 
Sundries, 



Repairs and improvements: — 
Brick, 

Cement, lime and plaster. 
Doors, sashes,, etc., 
Electrical work and supplies 
Hardware, . 



Lumber, 
Machinen.- 
Paints. on, 
Plumbing, 



etc., . 

glass, etc., . 
steam fitting and 



Roofing and materials. 
Sundries. 



suppH 



Farm, stable and grounds: — 
Blacksmith and supplies, 
Carriages, wagons, etc., and repairs, 
Fertilizers, ^Ines, seeds, etc. 
Hay, grain, etc., . 
Harnesses and repairs, 
Horses, 
Cows, 

Other live stock, . 
Tools, farm machines, etc., 
Simdries, 



Miscellaneous: — 

Books, periodicals, etc., 

Chapel services and entertainments, 

Freight, expressage and transportation, 



579 03 
12 75 

985 48 
16 21 



>1.951 11 
308 56 
61 96 
500 53 
894 31 

1,045 76 
135 20 
432 25 



54.760 53 
2,918 66 
129 95 
7 71 
269 23 
118 10 



S66 55 
361 59 
229 58 
1,930 58 
1.471 40 
1,763 52 
291 25 
1.529 07 
4,239 90 
46 49 
799 46 



$254 31 
272 63 
5.971 36 
',253 60 
207 97 
785 00 
25 00 
160 97 
633 79 
121 67 



$120 09 
660 18 
2,623 38 



5,558 79 



5,329 68 



8,204 18 



12,729 39 



13,686 30 



Amounts carried forward, 



$3,403 65 $108,355 65 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 70. 



37 



Amounts brought forward, 



S3,403 65 $108,355 65 



Miscellaneous — Con. 
Funeral expenses, 

Gratuities, ..... 
Hose, etc., ..... 
Medicines and hospital supplies, . 
Medical attendance, nurses, etc. (extra) 
Manual training supplies, 
Postage, ..... 
Printing and printing supplies, 
Printing annual report, 
Return of runaways. 
Soap and laundrj- supplies, . 
Stationerj- and office supplies, 
Travel and expenses (officials), 
Telephone and telegraph, 
Tobacco, ..... 
Sundries, ..... 



40 00 
15 84 
120 03 
690 73 

95 31 
317 36 
129 79 
144 29 
236 58 

98 60 
604 84 
265 30 
588 69 
577 96 
718 83 

96 55 



8.144 35 



Total expenses for maintenance, 



$116,500 00 



Special Appropriation: 

Balance Dec. 1, 1909, 

Appropriations for fiscal year, .... 



Total, 



$12,749 29 
16.000 00 

$28,749 29 



Expended during the year (see statement annexed). 
Reverting to treasurj- of Commonwealth, 



$25,666 02 
14 42 



25,680 44 



Balance Nov. 30, 1910, 



$3,068 85 



Resources axd Liabilities. 
Resources. 

Cash on hand $3,534 24 

November cash vouchers (paid from advance money) , 1 ,465 76 

Due from treasurj- of Commonwealth account, 

November, 1910, schedule 283 81 



Liabilities. 



Schedule of November bills, 



$5,283 81 
$5,283 81 



38 



GARDNER STATE 



COLONY. 



[Dec. 1910. 



pq a 



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in 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



[Form pbescribed by State Board of Ixsaxity.] 



1 . — General Statistics of the Year. 









Males 




Totals. 




388 


194 


582 




79 


33 


112 




70 


30 


100 


from VLsit, 


- 




2 




9 


1 


10 


Whole n mber of cases within the year, . . . . 


467 


227 


6941 




49 


20 


69 


Viz.: discharged, 


10 


4 


14 


as reco\"'ered at time of leaving hospital. 


3 


1 


4 




1 


1 


2 




2 


1 


3 


as not improved, 


4 


1 


5 


as not insane, 


- 


- 


- 




10 


6 


16 




19 
6 


9 


28 


on visit Oct. 1, 1910, 


4 


- 
1 


6 
5 


Patients remaining Sept. 30, 1910, 


418 


207 


625 


Viz.: supported as State patients 


412 


205 


617 










as reimbursing patients, .... 


6 


2 


8 


Number of different persons within the year, .... 


460 


225 


685 




73 


31 


104 


Number of different persons dismissed, 


43 


18 


61 


Number of different persons recovered, 


3 


1 


4 


Number of different persons discharged as capable of self-support, 


1 


1 


2 


Daily average of patients, 


399.927 


203.053 


602.980 


Viz.: State patients, 


389.177 


201.843 


591.020 










reimbursing patients 


10.75 


1.21 


11.96 



1 Includes 7 patients absent on escape and 1 on visit at the beginning of the year and nominally 
admitted for discharge. 



42 GARDNER STATE COLONY. [Dec. 



2. — Received on First and Subsequent Admissions. 



NUMBER OF ADMISSION. 


Cases admitted. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


First (to the colony), .... 


68 


30 


98 


Second (to the colony), 


2 




2 


Total cases, 


70 


30 


100 


Total persons, .... 


70 


30 


100 



3. — Aqes of Insane at First Attack and Death. 





Persons died. 


AGES. 


AT 


FIRST ATTACK. 


AT TIME OF DEATH. 




Males. 




-1. XJIkXIO' 




tU 3(163 • 




Congenital, .... 


1 


1 


2 








15 years and less, 


- 












From 15 to 20 years. 


- 












20 to 25 years, 


1 


1 


2 








25 to 30 years. 


2 




2 


1 




1 


30 to 35 years. 


2 




2 


1 


1 


2 


35 to 40 years, 


3 


1 


4 


1 




1 


40 to 50 years. 




1 


1 


3 




3 


50 to 60 years. 




1 


1 


2 


3 


5 


60 to 70 years. 








2 


2 


4 


70 to 80 years. 














Over 80 years, . 














Total, .... 


9 


5 


14 


10 


6 


16 


Unknown, .... 


1 


1 


2 








Not insane, .... 














Total persons. 


10 


6 


16 


10 


6 


16 


Mean known age (in years). 


27.8 


31.8 


29.8 


47.2 


50 


48.6 



1910.] 



PUBLIC 



DOCUMENT — Xo. 70. 



43 



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r < I 




GARDNER STATE COLOXY. 



n 



■=ys:ox 



2: 

is 



IIJJ 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — Xo. 70. 



45 



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CAUSK.S OK DEATH. 


Acute nci)hritiH, 
(yhronic (HIT use nephritis, 

Appendicitis 

Broncho pneumonia. 
Cerebral hemorrliaKO, 
Diabetes mellitus, . 
(Jcncral miliary tuberculosis, . 
Mitral insufficiency. 
Paretic convulsion, . 
Perforating ulcer of pylor\is, . 
Septic endocarditis, 

Totals 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 











1 






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124 4 






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5 to 10 


10 to 20 


er 20 years. 


Totals, . 


iknown, . 


Totals, . 


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Av( 



Public Document 



No. 70 



NINTH ANNUAL EEPOET ' 

OF 

THE TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

Gardner State Colony, 

AT GARDNER, MASS., 

FOR THE 

Year ending Novem-ber 30, 1911. 




BOSTON: 

WEIGHT & POTTEE FEINTING CO., STATE PEINTEES, 
18 Post Office Squaee. 




■ ^ 



Approved by 
The State Board of Publication. 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

List of Officers, 5 

Report of Trustees, 7 

Report of Superintendent, 9 

industrla.l department, 13 

Farm Products, by Colonies, 21 

Report of Treasurer, . ; 31 

Statistical Tables, 37 



TETSTEES AXD OFFICERS 

OF THE 

GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



Board of Trustees. 



EDMUND A. WHIT^L\X, Chairman, 
Mrs. AMIE H. GOES, Secretary, 
GEORGE X. HARWOOD, . 
WILBUR F. WHITNEY, . 
Mrs. -\LICE M. SPRING, 
^VILLLIM H. B.^KER, M.D., 
JOHN G. BLAEE, M.D., . 



Cambridge. 
Worcester. 
Barre. 

South Ashbubnham. 

FiTCEBURG. 

Lts-n-. 
Boston-. 



Sujwrmtendent and Treasxirer. 

CH.\RLES T. LaMOURE, M.D. 



Assistant Superintendent. 

THOMAS LITTLEWOOD, M.D. 



Assistant Physician. 
GARDNER N. COBB. M.D. 



Directors of Industries. 



Mrs. Lillian A. Greejte, 
Mr. Albert D. Darlixg, 
Mr. JoHx H. Jexkixs, 
Mr. Albert E. Gates, 
Mr. Custer A. Pare:er. 
Mrs. Bertha A. Brooks, 



Director of Industries for Women, 
Director of Industries for Men. 
Supervisor of Furniture Making. 
Supervisor of Painting. 
Supervisor of Shoemaking, 
Tailoress. 



Mrs. Mart Fish, 

Mr. George A. Greexe, 



Superrisors. 



Women's Receiving Ward. 
Men's Receinng Ward. 



Matrons. 
Mrs. E. L. Bryant. 
Mrs. S. G. Harrington*. 
Mrs. H. J. Larkix. 
Mrs. W. R. Laraix. 
Mrs. G. C. Burgess. 
Mrs. E. F. Grover. 
Mrs. M. H. Staples. 



Colonies. 

Westminster Cottages. 
VaUey Farm Cottages. 
Gardner Cottages. 
Belcher Cottage. 
Hill crest Camp. 
Highland Cottage. 
Fairview Cottage. 



Supervisors. 
Mr. E. L. Brtan-t. 
Mr. S. G. Habrixgtox. 
Mr. H. J. Labkix. 
Mr. W. R. Laraix. 
Mr. G. C. Burgess. 



Miss Helex I. MacMaster, 
Miss LiLLL43r M. Saun-ders, 
Miss Elizabeth M. Rt.vx. . 
Mrs. Gertrude A. Bean-e, . 
Mr. Thomas P. Mullixs, . 



. Bookkeeper. 

. Stenographer. 

. Stenographer. 

. Record Clerk. 

. Supervisor of Supplies, 



Ctjc tCommontocaltl) of ilta35acl)U5ctt5. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

We have the honor to present the ninth annual report of 
the trustees of the Gardner State Colony. 

Dr. Charles E. Thompson, who has been superintendent 
during the past five years, resigned during this year to accept 
the position of secretary of the State Board of Insanity. We 
cannot speak too highly of his work. He organized the indus- 
trial work and greatly enlarged the farm work, so that at the 
time of his resignation over 90 per cent, of our patients were 
engaged in some useful work during the whole or some portion 
of the day. Dr. Thompson brought to his work a rare intelli- 
gence and devotion, and has already placed himself in the front 
rank of those whose work is the welfare of the, so-called, chronic 
insane. He is an administrative and executive officer of high 
order. He leaves with our sincere regrets and our best wishes 
for success in his new field. 

We have appointed as his successor Dr. Charles T. LaMoure, 
of the staff of the State Hospital at Kochester, X. Y., where 
he has done remarkable work with demented cases. 

We are very hopeful for the future of the work of the colony. 
Xot only do we expect a still larger development of industrial 
efficiency, but a restoration to the patients of a measure of 
normal mental condition, resulting not only in a happier and 
more contented life, but in some cases, as we hope, in their 
restoration to their homes or to the community, not cured, but 
so trained as to be able to carry on some of the business of 
life even though with impaired mental powers. 



8 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



We are especially hopeful for demented cases entrusted to 
our care while the disease is in its incipient stages, and we 
trust that such cases can be sent to us even though the patients 
are temporarily separated from their friends, as the feeble- 
minded are now sent to Waverley. 

We aim, therefore, to build for small groups of patients so 
as to afford them reasonably homelike surroundings, and to put 
these buildings in charge, not of attendants in the conventional 
sense, but of instructors interested in the intellectual and ma- 
terial progress of their patients. We need, however, homelike 
surroundings for those in charge as well as for those in their 
care. We are asking this year for 2 cottages to provide for 16 
patients each, without barnlike dormitories, but with separate 
rooms to be shared by 2 patients. In the future we expect to 
ask for more of these small houses, and also for better and more 
comfortable quarters for our officers and instructors. These 
buildings we can construct with our own labor, patients and 
employees working together. 

We are building a rural community, not an institution, and 
we need facilities for recreation ajjd amusement for patients 
and employees. Eew of those who are sent to us are so far 
demented that they cannot receive some uplift from the joy of 
making things with their own hands. The influence of occu- 
pation is far-reaching, and we are now only beginning to appre- 
ciate its value, which, if not curative, may be palliative and 
restorative. 

We invite the attention of all interested in the welfare of the 
mentally diseased to the work of the colony. 

EDMUIsTD A. WHITMAlsT. 
GEORGE IsT. HARWOOD, 
ALICE M. SPRIE-G. 
AMIE H. GOES. 
WILBUR F. WHITKEY. 
JOTLN G. BLAKE. 
WILLIAM H. BAKER. 



1911.] 



FOLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 70. 



9 



SUPEPJXTEXDEXrS REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Gardner State Colony. 

I respectfullj submit herewith the ninth annual report of the 
Gardner State Colony. 

In matters relating to patients, the year ends September 30, 
while those concerning finances are for the year ending Xov. 
30, 1911. 

Patients. 

On Oct. 1, 1910. there were at the colony, men, 418 ; women, 
207, — a total of 625. During the year 35 men and 45 women 
have been admitted, as follows : 24 men from the Worcester 
State Hospital; 1 man from Bridgewater State Farm: IS 
women from the Danvers State Hospital; 26 wcmien from 
Xorthampton State Hospital : 4 men and 1 woman from visit ; 
6 men from elopement. 

Twenty-four men and 7 w(Mnen have been dismissed, as fol- 
lows : 4 men as capable of self-support : 6 men as not improved. 
Seven men and 4 women have died. Three men and 1 woman 
have been transferred to other hospitals, as follows : 1 man and 
1 woman to Xorthampton State Hospital ; 1 man to Worcester 
State Asylum ; 1 man to Medfield State Hospital. 

Two men have eloped and have not been returned. Two 
men and 2 women are out on visit, so our actual census for 
Oct. 1, 1911, is, men, 429, women. 245. — a total of 674. The 
whole number cared for during the year was, .men, 445 ; women, 
252, — a total of 697. 

The daily average during the year ending Sept. 30, 1911, 
has been 652, and for the financial year ending Xov. 30, 1911, 
660. — an increase of 50 over last year. 

The general health of our patients has been good. 



10 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



IXDOOE IXDUSTEIES. 

Our industrial buildings are a source of great satisfaction 
to all. We do not consider the amount of work accomplished 
of chief importance, but the systematic method of getting pa- 
tients interested, and teaching them the different industries, 
step by step, is our chief aim. A better name for our indus- 
trial buildings would be schools, as each industrial building is 
provided with trained instructors, who follow up each case day 
by day. Our nurses, from the wards, also go to the industrial 
buildings for instruction, and then try to get patients on their 
wards, who are unable to go to the industrial building, inter- 
ested in some industry. At the present time 90 patients go 
to the industrial buildings daily. 

It is our chief aim to teach our patients some industiy while 
here at the colony, so that as they become interested in work 
they improve mentally, and if they become well enough to leave 
the colony they have acquired the habit of work, and have also 
learned to do certain work well. 

Inasmuch as our patients are transferred to us from other 
institutions and are of the so-called chronic class, we cannot 
expect many real recoveries, but we do expect to so improve 
many that they can live away from an institution and practi- 
cally be seK-supporting. 

Some may need a little supervision, and if the relatives are 
really interested enough in the patient to try them on a visit, 
we are always glad to advise the relatives how to properly su- 
pervise the patient's daily life. If, in the near future, the 
hospitals each have field workers, many more cases can be cared 
for away from the institutions, and the field workers, by mak- 
ing systematic visits to these patients and giving friendly ad- 
vice, will be of great assistance to the patients as well as the 
public. 

We endeavor at the colony to give our patients as homelike 
surroundings as are possible, at the same time giving them the 
maximum amount of liberty, and for this reason we are this 
year asking appropriations for 1 cottage for 30 patients, and 2 
cottages each for 16 patients. 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



11 



We would like more of the younger cases of dementia prse- 
cox, so that we can, bv re-educational methods, discover how 
much this apparent dementia may be averted, and to what ex- 
tent these cases may be developed. Many cases transferred to 
us in times past have been cases whose mental trouble devel- 
oped late in life. While we can improve such cases to a certain 
extent, we cannot expect to accomplish as much as with the 
cases whose mental trouble began earlier in life. 

Outdoor Industries. 

We have continued the reclamation of waste land during the 
past year, have built several new roads about the colony, and 
have done considerable gTading and clearing about the various 
groups. Crops have been very satisfactory and will provide 
an abundant supply of all kinds of vegetables for the year. 

Women have been employed in gardening at Highland cot- 
tage and Fairview cottage, and we hope to provide more out- 
door work for women next year. 

CoNSTRUCTIOlt AND BETTERMENTS. 

Highland cottage was opened April 4, and provides for 30 
women patients. 

A new cottage for employees was opened in September. 

The second cottage for employees is well under way and will 
be completed in the early spring. 

The cottage for 30 men will be started in the spring and 
probably completed in the fall. 

As all our building is done by our mechanics, assisted by 
patients, it takes longer than if done by contract. 

Generax. 

Eeligious services have been held every other Sunday. 

The Rev. J. F. McDermott of Gardner has visited us when 
called and ministered to those who were ill. 

During the summer a weekly ball game has been played by 
the patients and officers. Each week a patients' dance has 
been held. This fall we have started a dancing school for 
patients which meets every Saturday afternoon. We have also 



12 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



started a choir composed of patients and officers to make our 
chapel services more interesting. 

Shorter hours of duty have been arranged for employees and 
now we have a sixty-hour schedule. 

I wish to thank the following for supplying us with maga- 
zines and other reading matter : Mrs. Amie H. Goes, Dr. J. B. 
Howland, Mrs. Stockwell, Mrs. Sargent, Miss Turner, Dr. 
Underwood, Mr. Oliver Schoonmaker, " The Church Record," 
Athol, The W. C. T. U., the Y. M, C A., The M. S. P. C. 
A., Rev. Albert R. Parker, and the Gardner Boat Club. 

Staff. 

Dr. Paul R. Felt, assistant physician since June 13, 1910, 
ended his services May 22, 1911, to enter private practice in 
Amherst, N. H. 

Dr. Gardner iN". Cobb was appointed assistant physician and 
entered upon his duties June 12, 1911. 

Requirements. 

To successfully carry out the industrial plan of the colony 
requires efficient, interested and, most of all, kind-hearted em- 
ployees. Our employees are not merely employed to watch the 
patients, but to do everything to make them happy and to 
encourage them. At the colony much tact and skill is required 
to gain our patients' interest and our employees should consider 
themselves in the double role of nurse and instructor and should 
measure themselves by their ability to gain their patients' con- 
fidence and to bring them back to a normal view of life. We 
have many such employees and we thank them for their cheer- 
ful co-operation in the advancement of the colony. 

To the Board I wish to express my appreciation of the honor 
they conferred on me by appointing me superintendent and 
to thank them for their help and hearty support. 

Respectfully submitted, 



CHAS. T. LaMOURE, 

Superintendent. 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 70. 



13 



INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT. 



WORK DONE BY WOMEN. 



Aprons, carpenters', . 


30 


Doilies, button-holed. 


2 


Aprons, embroidered, 


24 


Doilies, embroidered. 


12 


Aprons, gingham. 


321 


Drawn work : — 




Aprons, kitchen, 


6 


Bureau covers. 


10 


Aprons, nurses'. 


8 


Doilies, . . . . 


3 


Aprons, tea, .... 


20 


Sideboard scarfs, . 


2 


Aprons, white, waitress', . 


12 


Drawers, cotton. 


158 


Bags, bean, .... 


6 


Dresses, . . . . . 


372 


Bags, Christmas, 


200 


Drop cloths (for painter), 10 by 




Bags, coffee and tea. 


38 


15 feet, .... 


3 


Bags, laundry. 


6S 


Dusters, . . . . . 


41 


Bag, crocheted. 


1 


Garters, pair, . . . . 


1 


Bags, raffia, silk-lined. 


7 


Garters, pairs, .... 


17 


Bandages, .... 


625 


Hair picked, pounds. 


300 


Baskets, raffia. 


160 


Handkerchiefs: — 




Baskets, reed, small. 


10 


Embroidered, 


112 


Baskets, reed, waste. 


2 


Hemstitched, 


53 


Bath-tub cover, 


1 


Hats woven, dolls', . 


3 


Belts, embroidered, . 


16 


Hats woven, men's, . 


442 


Belt, machine, canvas, 


1 


Holders, ..... 


24 


Bibs, nurses', .... 


4 


Jabots, embroidered. 


4 


Bibs, embroidered, baby's. 


2 


Jabots, Irish crochet. 


8 


Blankets, hemmed, . 


144 


Jabots, tatting, 


2 


Bureau covers, hemmed, . 


21 


Jumpers. .... 


426 


Bureau covers, hemstitched, 


15 


Lace crocheted, yards. 


Sf 


BiiriaJ robes, .... 


9 


Lace knitted, yards. 


3 


Carriage cover, canvas, 


1 


Linen woven, yards. 


21| 


Center pieces, embroidered, 


34 


Luncheon doilies, 19 pieces, em- 




Chemises, .... 


60 


broidered sets. 


2 


Chemises, embroidered. 


5 


Mats, knitted, silk, . 


5 


Coats, khaki, .... 


34 


Mats, enlarged. 


22 


Coats, men's outside. 


372 


Mittens, canvas, pairs. 


6 


Collars, tiimover, embroidered, . 


12 


Mittens, canvas and skin, pairs. 


679 


Collars, Dutch, embroidered. 


3 


Mittens, cloth, pairs. 


101 


Collar, Irish crochet, 


1 


Mittens, corduroy, pairs, , 


192 


Collar, silk 


1 


Napkins, hemmed, . 


120 


Collar and cu£fs, embroidered. 




Neckties, crocheted, men's. 


2 


sets, ..... 


9 


Neckties, cotton, men's, 


58 


Corset covers, .... 


40 


Neckties, silk, men's, 


521 


Corset covers, embroidered. 


10 


Nightdresses, .... 


132 


Covers for mattresses. 


53 


Overalls, .... 


348 


Curtains, long, pairs. 


17 


Pads, quilted ticking. 


8 


Curtains, long, faggoted, pairs. 


11 


Pads, sanitary. 


539 


Curtains, scrim, sash, pairs, 


171 


Pillow cases, .... 


2,249 


Curtains, burlap, 


5 1 


Pillow ticks, .... 


94 



14 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



Pillow, feather, 


1 


Slipper tops stitched, men's. 




Pillows, hair, .... 


31 


parrs, ..... 


502 


Pillow tops, embroidered, . 


3 


Slipper tops stitched, women's, 




Pincushion tops, embroidered, . 


2 


pairs, . . . . . 


11 


Raffia pin trays. 


2 


Sofa pillows, scrim, . 


4 


Raffia jardinieres, 


5 


Sofa pillow tops, gingham, 


9 


Reed hamper, .... 


1 


Sofa pillow tops, linen, hem- 




Reed jardinieres. 


4 


stitched, .... 


2 


Reed table tops, 


3 


Stockings, colored, pairs, . 


145 


Reed whisk-broom holder. 


1 


Stockings, knitted, women's. 




Rags, colored, pounds. 


100 


pairs, ..... 


2 


Reefers, . . . . . 


39 


Stockings, toed, men's, pairs, 


2,215 


Rugs, braided. 


170 


Stockings, toed, women's, pairs. 


551 


Rugs, hooked, . . . . 


29 


Suspenders, pairs. 


180 


Sack, baby's crocheted, 


1 


Table cloths, hemmed. 


32 


Shawls, crocheted, . 


22 


Table covers, hemstitched. 


4 


Sheets, hemmed, 


699 


Table mats, crocheted, 


10 


Shirts, hospital. 


92 


Tatting edging, yards. 




Shirts, outside. 


1,093 


Ties, hemstitched, women's. 


20 


Shirtwaists, . . . . 


16 


Ties, lawn, embroidered, . 


12 


Shoe counters, stitched, men's. 




Ties, silk, women's, . 


2 


pairs, . . . . . 


16 


Towels, embroidered, 


7 


Shoes, corduroy, men's, pair. 


1 


Towels, hemmed. 


900 


Shoes, lined, pairs, . 


2 


Tray cloths, . 


16 


Shoes, stitched, pairs, 


16 


Trousers, .... 


522 


Shoe tops stitched, canvas, pairs. 


2 


Underdrawers, men's. 


272 


Shoe tops stitched, men's, pairs. 


184 


Underdrawers, women's, . 


187 


Shoe tops stitched, women's. 




Underskirts, .... 


112 




56 




172 


Shoes, crocheted, baby's, pairs, . 


2 


Under^-ests, women's. 


154 


Shoes, kmtted, baby's, pair. 


1 


Uniforms, nurses', . 


o 


Shoes repaired, pairs. 


8 


Vests, . ... 


134 


Slippers, crocheted, pair, . 


1 


Wicks, surgical. 


120 


Slippers, crocheted, children's. 




Wrists stitched on mittens, pairs, 


29 


pairs, , . . 


3 








Mexdixg. 




Aprons, ..... 


204 


Doilies, ..... 


16 


Awning and tent. 


1 


Drawers, .... 


649 


Bags, coffee, .... 


31 


Dresses, ..... 


1,010 


Bags, laundry. 




Dress skirt made over. 


1 


Bags, tea, .... 


4 


Dusters, ..... 


20 


Bedspreads, .... 


19 


Flag, times, .... 


8 


Bibs 


24 


Holders, 


5 


Blankets, .... 


584 


Hospital shirts. 


14 


Blankets, horse. 


29 


Jumpers, .... 


383 


Bureau covers, drawn work, 


2 


Mittens, ..... 


51 


Cape, woman's, . 




Napkins, .... 


5 


Caps, ..... 


I, 


Nightdresses, .... 


1,088 


Chemises, .... 


194 


Overalls, .... 


1,256 


Coats, ..... 


2,180 


Petticoats, .... 


495 


Corsets, ..... 


15 


Pillow cases, .... 


41 


Corset covers, .... 


168 


Pillow ticks, .... 


49 


Curtain, ..... 


1 ' 


Reefers, ..... 


58 


Ciirtains, sash. 


9 1 


Rugs, ..... 


46 


Cia-tains, stage. 


4 , 


Sheets, ..... 


33 



J 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — Xo. 70. 15 



csuirts. 


417 


TncTQ on iiTiripTplri'f'Hinfy 


68 


Shirts, outing, . 


1 566 


X J Ckjr ^lUSj • • • 


18 




11 


Trousers, 


. 2,259 


Shoes, 


4 


Underdrawers, 


. 1.383 


Sideboard cover, 


1 


Under\-ests, 


. 1.605 


Stockings, pairs, 


. 10,271 


Union suits, 


5 


Sweaters, 


8 


Vests 


. 275 


Table cloths, . 


. . IS 


Window shades. 


4 


Table oil cloths, 


. 126 


Wrappers tucked. 


10 



WORK Dox: 



Blankets, stable, repaired, . 6 j 

Brogans made, pairs, . . 460 j 

Brogans repaired : — j 

Heels, pairs, . . . S22 
Patched, . . .141 
Relasted, pairs, . . .137 

Tapped, pairs, . . . 563 

Brooms made, .... 348 

Rattan, .... 42 

Toy 2S I 

Whisk 12S j 

Brushes made : — 

Counter, .... 40 

Floor 50 

Long-handle squilgee, 30 
Scrub, . . .100 

Vegetable, .... 50 

Climbers, pair, ... 1 

Harnesses repaired, ... 5 

Mats, cocoa: — 

4 feet by 30 inches, . . 7 

22 feet by 33 inches, . . 3 

35 feet by 34 inches, . 1 

35 feet by 20 inches, . . 1 

Mattresses: — 

Hair, 68 

Husk 1 

Made over, .... 3 

Rag 1 

Mittens cut out, pairs, . . 712 j 



BY MEN. 



Pillows : — 




Hair, . ' . 


94 


^lade over, . . . . 


75 


Printing! — 




Envelopes made, . 


632 


Garbage reports, 


5,223 


In'\"itations, . . . . 


1,800 


I>aundry lists. 


6,126 


Monthly work tables, ruled. 


70 


Programs, . . . . 


1,6S0 


Shirting woven, yards. 


592 


Shoes made: — 




Men's, pairs. 


102 


Women's, pairs. 


158 


Shoes repaired : — 




Felt, patched, pairs. 


134 


Heels, pairs. 


98 


Heels, rubber, pairs, 


9 


Patches, . . . . 


16 


Rubber, patched, pairs, 


179 


Tapped, pairs. 


112 


Uppers stitched, pairs, . 


12 


Slippers made, pairs, 


510 


Slippers repaired; — 




Heels, pairs. 


238 


Relasted, pairs. 


78 


Stockings made: — 




Men's, pairs. 


3,686 


Women's, pairs. 


1,806 


Toweling woven, yards. 


2,224 


Wrist ers, pairs. 


8S4 



BLACKSMITH AXD MACHESTIST. 



Angle irons made, . 
Anchor irons made, . 
Axles set, 
Bands, 

Boilers, copper, soldered. 
Bolts made. 
Braces made, . 
Brackets, staging. 
Brake irons repaired. 



150 
125 
4 
57 
15 
300 
40 
25 



Brakes, wagon, made. 
Car mover repaired. 
Carriage bodies ironed, 
Chain made, feet. 
Chains, cattle, repaired. 
Chains, farm, repaired. 
Chains, stake, repaired. 
Clamps made, . 
Cold chisels made, . 



2 
1 

2 

25 
20 
40 
10 
30 
100 



16 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



Vyruwuciro repd-iicu, • • • 


rtKf 


xiuxxxuixig repairs \^07i% 








IV^Gn s wRrd. 




Grub hoGS rcpsircd, . . * 


94. 


Valley housG. 






75 


VV colXXXXIXotc;! CUtLtlgc* 




XlctilUWA IcpalicU) • . • 


4 


fV UUXcxX o WdxU,. 




XJ.lLL^t;o iXl<lU.C| • • • • 


10 


X UxX^ ItjoxXUCXy • • • • 


X 


XjLUUA.b lllcl(J,c?9 • • • • 




Rings iHEdc, • • • . 


iU 




' g 


JvOOKcr pidtco IXXdCK^, • • 


o 
o 






XvUvlo WXtXX tixXcdUo dxXU. IXlXto, • 


9f;n 


J. L/C tUll^o ItrpciiXcUf • • • 


3 


SsnQlrPT'Ci tiit*tiq/^p 

OXXdivcXo, XUXxXdLi:?! • • • 


e 
O 


X^UX > CTo X C.^C4.X1 C/VX ) • • • 


10 


SVif^ft^ T'PirriTipr^ 

kJXXcX'X X C>XX L/XX^VXy • • • 


Q 

o 




A 
O 


Sliippers, belt, made, 




J^CIVXVXCXO X C7XX UXXC^U. f • • ■ 


2 


SsIpHg; TPT^QiT*Pri 

OXcU-o XcpdXXcLl, • • • 


4 


TiQ'fpnPQ riri/^T* TYiQriP 

XJd,LL.XlcOf LIUUX , XXxclLitr} • • 


3 


OXcLl XUXlXXtrXOy • • • • 




XJdvvix iixuwtrxo oixlix ptjiXCiMii • • 


g 


^1 PI (T n TP^nr^H 

OXcX^XX XcoXXULX| • • « • 


1 


XJC^Vt^Xo XUX UXclOJv(3t xll<lLlt^} • • 


g 


opuuxio, uxixiy oxxdxpcixt;Liy • • 


Q 
O 


AyTonfriP t'pt^q'i TPrl 

IVXdll^iC X t^pd-ix cLl, • • • 


1 


Staples made, . • • • 




Nsck yokes ironed^ . . • 


A 

u 


Stone boats ironed, * • • 


9 


IIvpt^ Qnr^ri t^qitq 


550 


S"fr4TiP r»oQ'fG T*PT^€^lT•P<^ 

otuxxt; LJUdLB xtrpdXXc;U., • « 


4 


VyAtrXl W dgUxio xcpdXxt/Llj • • 


7 


S'f/^TIP rifQIT T'PT^QlTPin 

loLt.)XiC UXd^ XcpdXXcU., • • 


X 


V,/A ^tjii^cs XcpdXXciaj • • • 




S+rinp HtiIIq TYifirlp 

OtUiXt/ LXXXXXo lXXdU.C, • • • 


10 


T'nlrPT'^ "fiiTTmpp 

X l^JVvi/XO) XVXXXXCXV>Oy • • • 


5 


S"^o'np Hrill^ Gnfi'P'nPTipn 

yO\j\jLl.\^ \.XXXXJ.O oXXclX J^C/XXv^l.!, • • 


500 


X ClXXXLV^X O XXXXgo cXXXVX. L/L/XtO} • • 


30 


R'fnnP VlPTTlTYlPT' THflHp 

XjKJ lA.\I/ XXcXXXXXXXCX XXJcXU.^, • • 




*PipVq T'PQ'f'Ppl pri 


40 


T'lPPG TYifirIp 

XXXC^O XXXdAXvi^y • » • • 


10 


T^ipItq q n CI TT^PTi pri 

X XL/ii^o olXdX pCiXcU., • • • 


375 


T^irPG QP'f PQTTlQCyP 

X XX Co oC/t, l^dXXXd^C?! • • • 


7 


JT IxLKi IXdXXgcX O XxIdiX-C) • • • 




X X LXoO XUCXo XXXdLXC, • • • 


g 


i^lnmrMTifT TTItyi l^r^'f "fca rrp 
X XliXlX UXi-L^f Jl;XiJ.l v^Uttd^Ca 




T> d^UXX UULXXco XcXlUXXCU.| • • 


3 


X XLXLLXUXlXg XtJpdXXo. —— 




"Vtr?* OTiTl T^nlpQ TPlTTiTlpH 
Tr dgV^XX ^L/XCO X CXX WXXC'VX, • • 


3 


Belcher cottage. 




Wagon seat reironed. 


1 


T)nTnpQ"fip ViiTilrliTxy 
Xx ^XXXCO CXI^ uixxxvxxxxg* 




TVfi cmrk G'f'P'n tyia Hp 

TV CXg^XX oLC>_^ XXiCXvX^, ■ • • 


1 


Drain pipes from gutters and 




Washing machine repaired, 


1 


ice box at Highland cottage. 




Wheelbarrows reironed, 


300 


Fair\dew cottage. 




Whiffletrees, .... 


10 


Gardner cottage. 




Wrenches made, 


6 


Industrial building. 










CARPENTER. 




Axle bed lor ox cart, . • . 


1 


Cesspool covers, 


5 




1 


Clock repaired. 




XDllio, CUdl, . . • • 


2 


Comb rack, 26 by 3 by 4 inches. 


1 




1 


Crate for pump meter, 


1 


Board, linen room, . . . 


1 


Cross bar, .... 


1 


Box, bread, repaired, . 


1 


Curtain rod, .... 




Boxes, bread, . . . . 


5 


Cutting board. 


\ 


Box casing, window, . . 


1 


Doors, ..... 


9 


"Roy S Wir 1 f\ Vf\T K foot 

x>uA, o uy xo uy o xccl. 


1 


Doors repaired. 


34 


jjox, lo uy xy oy xo xnuxxco, 


1 


Eave trough, .... 


1 


JJU2L, xu uy Xo Xcct, . . . 


1 


End boards, ox-cart, 


2 


Boy 20 hv Q infhps 


1 


Evener, ..... 


1 


Boxes, 12 by 24 by 11 inches, 


3 


Fire screen repaired, 


1 


Boxes, covered, 


2 


Floors repaired. 


4 


Boxes, toilet paper, . 


5 


Hand float, .... 


1 


Box for grindstone, . 


1 


Hen house, re-covered, 54 by 1\ 




Buggy top repaired, . 


1 


feet, 


1 


Bulletin board. 


1 


Hog house, re-covered, 


1 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — Xo. 70. 17 



Ice run, zv o\ leet. 


1 
1 


Shafts made, .... 


o 


Ice run, 24 feet by 24 inphei«, 


1 


Shaft repaired. 


1 


Ironing board, 


1 


isneiA e», ..... 


o 
o 


Keys made, .... 


•7 
1 


Shoes, sled, .... 


Q 


Knives ground. 




Side boards, tip-cart, 


Q 

cS 


Ladders repaired. 


o 


o]gn Doaras, iij leet nj i.j nj g 




Ladles repaired. 


A 

4 


inches, .... 


o 


Locks repaired, 


o r 


Skj' light repaired. 


1 


Mail box, ..... 


I 


Soap rack, .... 


1 
1 


Mortar nod, .... 


1 


Spreader, .... 


•1 
1 


}s eck yokes, .... 


o 


Stalls renoored, 


5 


Xest boxes, .... 


•i 


Stalls repaired. 


/ 


Ox-carts repaired. 


Q 
O 


Stanchions repaired, 




Ox yoke repaired. 


1 


Starching board repaired, . 


i 


Oven peels repaired. 


Q 
O 


Stock, axle, repaired, 


1 


Patterns for castings. 


1 o 


Stone l.oats made. 


1 i 


Percolating stand repaired, dis- 




Stone boats repaired. 


9 


pensary, .... 


1 


i&wabs made, .... 


D 


Pig trough, 6 feet by 1 foot by 




Swabs repaired. 


5 


6 inches, .... 


1 


Switch boxes made, 


.-) 


rlatlorm, IJ oy J leet, 


1 


labies repaired. 


6 


Platform repaired, 


1 


Towel racks made. 


.-> 


Plugs, li^ by 4 inches. 




Tongue, wagon. 


1 


Roofs repaired, 


o 
£• 


Wagon seats repaired. 


p. 



Rug frame, .... 


1 


Wagons repaired. 


o 
o 


Runners, ox-sled, 


<> 


Wagon wheels, rims. 


c 
o 


c% \> o ii-ltrvl , • . . . 


90 


»i trll C ill U lli£tutr. 


1^ 


Sawhorses, .... 


3 


Whiffletrees made, . 


5 


Scissors sharpened, . 


95 


Whiffletrees repaired. 


2 


Screens, door, made. 


11 


Window boxes. 


2 


Screens, window, made. 


3 


Window guards, 


2 


Screens repaired. 


9 


Wheelbarrow pole repaired. 


1 


Serving trucks repaired, 


3 







FrRXITURE DEPARTMENT. 



Baskets, bushel. 


11 


Bureaus, 


14 


Bench, cobbler's. 


1 


Chairs, oak, 


19 


Bench, dining-room, 5 by IS by 




Chairs, dining-room. 


76 


ISffeet, .... 


1 


Desk 


1 


Bench, for mattress making. 


1 


Dolls with frames, 


4 


Bench, for sewing machine. 


1 


Frames, mat, . 


3 


Bench, work, .... 


1 


Frames, picture. 


52 


Billiard ball triangle, 


1 


Frames, rug. 


2 


Block, cutting. 


1 


Locks, .... 


11 


Block, meat, .... 


1 


Piano pedal holder, . 


1 


Block, pulley, .... 


1 


Pin board. 


1 


Box 


1 


Rack, pan, 


1 


Box with cover, 11 1 by 5 5 by 




Reel, for wire, . 


1 


4 inches, .... 


1 


Rockers, .... 


11 


Box with cover, Vl\ by 10 § by 




Rockers, rattan, 


10 


4 inches, .... 


1 


Sawhorses, 


6 


Brush, backs and tops. 


110 


Screens, window. 


9 


Brush, floor, heads, . 


28 


Shoe patterns, sawing out, 


36 


Brush, heads. 


56 


Shoe shanks, . 


. 1,500 


Brush, tops, .... 


60 


, Stools, 25 inches, 


7 



18 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



Stools, milking, 


9 


Wheelbarrows : — 




Street signs, . . , . 


19 


Wheelbarrows made, 


2 


TaVjles, bedside, 


27 


Wheelbarrow handles, . 


14 


Table, drop, 30 by 72 inches, . 


1 


Wheelbarrow iron shod. 


1 


iaoie, oy ou incnes, 


1 


Wheelbarrow legs. 


14 


iabies, Kitcnen, 


2 


Wheelbarrow tops. 


7 


Table, sewing, 24 by 4§ feet, 


1 








Repairs. 




Barber shears sharpened, . 


1 


Gumming, setting and filing cir- 




Beams for loom, 


2 


cular saw, .... 


1 


Beams fitted for loom. 


2 


Lapboard, .... 


1 


Beam holders, . . . . 


3 


Lawn mower sharpened and ad- 




Bedside table, legs, . 


2 


justed, .... 


1 


Bedside table, lower shelf. 


1 


Paper cutter sharpened. 


1 


Bedside table retopped. 


1 


Piano tops repaired. 


2 


Bench doweled, 


1 


Picture frames, 


47 


Bench reglued. 


1 


Potato parer sharpened. 


1 


Billiard cues retipped. 


59 


Rocking chairs. 


25 


Brakes, .... 


2 


Saw filed, .... 


1 


Brake, holder, . 


1 


Scissors sharpened, pair, . 


1 


Brake, wheel, . 


1 


Settees made, .... 


5 


Broom cutter sharpened, . 


1 


Settee legs, .... 


5 


Broom handles scraped, 


97 


Settee posts, .... 


3 


Bureau drawer. 


1 


Settees reglued, 


7 


Bureau drawers refitted, . 


11 


Sewing machines. 


19 


Bureau, frame holder. 


1 


Sewing machine belts. 


7 


Chairs : — 




Sewing machine bobbin and 




Arms, new, . . 


35 


plate, ..... 


1 


Arms repaired, 


11 


Shoe last. 


1 


Backs repaired. 


7 


Side pieces, . 


5 


Backs recaned, 


33 


Side stretches, .... 


4 


Braced, 


194 


Standard, .... 


1 


Legs, .... 


6 


Stepladder, .... 


1 


Legs repaired, 


6 


Swabs, ..... 


2 


Posts, .... 


6 


Swab handles, .... 


5 


Posts doweled, 


2 


Table doweled. 


1 


Posts repaired, 


5 


Table reglued, .... 


1 


Reglued, 


. 227 


Table repaired. 


1 


Reseated, 


91 


Wheelbarrows made. 


2 


Retopped, 


21 


Bolts, 


3 


Rockers, 


27 


Handles, .... 


17 


Rounds, 


39 


Iron shod, .... 


30 


Scraped, 


5 


New legs, .... 


228 


Spindles, 


28 


New tops, .... 


98 


Spindles, fiat. 


9 


New wheels. 


64 


Coat hooks. 


12 


Old tops, . . . 


51 


Commode cover. 


1 


Old wheels, .... 


41 


Curtains, .... 


6 


Window shades. 


3 


Cutting block planed. 


1 


Wood horses, .... 


2 


Dresser, .... 


1 







1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



19 



MASON. 



Brick work: — 




Cement work — Con. 




Boilers repaired, . 


6 


Pump foundation. 


1 


Brick used, red, 


1,000 


Steps made, flights. 


3 


Brick used, white. 


2,000 


Transformer house (1), square 




Chimneys built. 


2 


yards, . . . . 


20 


Brick used. 


3,000 


Window caps, 


10 


Fireplace built, 


1 


Miscellaneous: — 




Brick used. 


150 


Cesspools covered over. 


3 


Heater set up, 


1 


Chimneys flashed, 


3 


Brick used. 


150 


Cottage sills pointed up. 


2 


Jambs rebuilt. 


4 


Clean-out doors put in, . 


8 


Brick used. 


700 


Cold-storage boxes pointed up. 


2 


Piers built, .... 


9 


Door closed up. 


1 


Brick used. 


900 


Doorways cut through, . 


2 


Transformer house : — 




Double door cut through. 


1 


Brick used, 


5,000 


Drain tile laid, feet. 


600 


Trapdoor built, 


1 


Holes cut in walls, 


10 


Brick used. 


200 


Holes drilled in walls. 


29 


Cement work : — 




Wall pointed, square feet. 


2,600 


Bulkheads, .... 


2 


Plastering : — 




Cap stone, 35 by 2 feet. 




Building, square yards, . 


3,885 


Cellars cemented (4), square 




Locker room, 20 by 8 feet, 3 




yards, .... 


795 


coats, . . . . 


1 


Cement base, 60 feet by 1 foot. 




Patches put on. 


90 


Cement caps, 6 by 2 feet by 




Smoke room, 50 by 30 feet, 3 




4 inches, .... 


2 


coats, . . . . 


11 


Concrete dam, cubic feet. 


600 


Stone work: — 




Concrete roof, square yards, . 


2,025 


Buttress, .... 


1 




2,000 


Cesspools, cubic feet. 


1 100 


Door sills, .... 


10 


Dry walls, cubic feet. 


4^860 


Door treads, 


2 


Mortar walls, cubic feet, 


19,200 


Hitching posts, 


3 


Piers, ..... 


12 


Lavatory, square yards. 


25 


Transformer house founda- 




Patch, coal pocket. 


1 


tion, cubic feet. 


528 


Planer foundation, 


1 


Window jambs rebuilt, . 


6 




PAINTER. 




Andirons painted. 


2 


Brush handles, 


4 


Automobile varnished. 


1 


Buildings finished inside, , 


11 


Baskets finished, 


3 


Buildings finished outside. 


8 


Bath-tubs enameled. 


5 


Bulletin board finished, 


1 


Beds enameled. 


6 


Bureaus finished. 


15 


isenches finished. 


4 


Bureaus refinished, . 


8 


Bedside tables finished, 


32 


Cabinet painted. 


1 


Blinds, pairs, .... 


4 


Carriages painted and var- 




Bookcase refinished. 


1 


nished, .... 


6 


Boxes, bread, .... 


2 


Carts, 


3 


Box, card index, 


1 


Ceilings whitened, 


61 


Box, large, lettered and var- 




Chairs finished, new. 


163 


nished, .... 


1 


Chairs refinished, 


255 


Boxes, miscellaneous, 


6 


Chicken crates oiled. 


5 


Brush heads, .... 


14 


Counter finished. 


1 



20 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



Desk finished, . 


1 


Lockers varnished, . 


22 


Desks refinished, 


2 


Pail lettered, .... 


1 


Desk handle finished, 


1 


Paper, rolls, hung. 


196 


Doors painted, 


14 


Rack, music, finished. 


1 


Doors oiled, 


5 


Roofs, tin, .... 


4 


Doors revarnished, . 


24 


Rooms refinished throughout, 


14 


Doors, screen, painted, 


22 


Screens painted. 


294 


Flag pole painted. 


1 


Sewing machines varnished. 


6 


Flag, State emblem, painted, 


1 


Settees refinished. 


9 


Floors painted. 


13 


Shafts, pair, .... 


1 


Floors oiled, 


14 


Shafts leathered, pairs. 


2 


Floors varnished. 


21 


Signs lettered, .... 


5 


Frame for blue print. 


1 


Sleds painted, .... 


3 


Frames, picture, 


28 


Sleighs painted and varnished, . 


5 


Frames, fire notice, . 


6 


Stools, ..... 


7 


Glass lights reset, 


341 


Tables finished. 


18 


Hose truck varnished, 


1 


Tables refinished, 


19 


Horses for rug frames, 


4 


Trays refinished. 


4 


Inkstand refinished, . 


1 


Ventilators (root cellars), . 


3 


Kitchen cabinet painted, . 


1 


Wagons, express, painted and 




Ladders painted. 


5 


varnished, .... 


3 


Ladder truck varnished, 


1 


Wagons, heavy. 


3 


Lapboard refinished. 


1 


Washing machines, . 


4 


Linen closets refinished, 


3 


Whiflaetrees painted. 


3 



DOMESTIC DEPARTMENT. 
Manufactured. 

Soap, soft, pounds, .......... 4,800 



Pickles, Preserves, etc. 



Apple jelly, quarts, 


3 


Pears, quarts, . 


. 137 


Beans, string, canned, quarts. 


. 159 


Pears, pickled, quarts. 


8 


Beans, string, pickled, barrels. 


4 


Pears, spiced, quarts. 


5 


Blackberries, quarts. 


. 171 


Pickles, chopped, quarts, . 


8 


Blackberry jelly, quarts, . 


3 


Pickles, cucumber, barrels. 


7 


Blueberries, quarts, . 


1,440 


Pickles, mustard, quarts, . 


30 


Cherries, quarts, 


. 118 


Pickles, sweet, gallons. 


6 


Citron, quarts. 


12 


Piccalilli, gallons. 


27 


Crab apple jelly, quarts, . 


9 


Plums, quarts, 


28 


Crab apples, quarts, 


3 


Pumpkins, quarts. 


16 


Cranberries, quarts, . 


38 


Raspberries, quarts, . 


. • 44 


Currant jelly, quarts. 


4 


Rhubarb, quarts. 


12 


Grapes, quarts. 


23 


Strawberries, quarts. 


18 


Grape jelly, quarts, . 


4 


Tomatoes, green, qiiarts, . 


69 


Peaches, quarts. 


13 


Tomatoes, ripe, quarts, 


6 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



21 



PRODUCTS OF FARM, BY COLONIES. 



Belcher Cottage. 





4;74. 


19 


A cTkQT*ci tyno V»iTnr»Vi<3c q^" V»/tv 




00 




90 


9Pi 


Rpnnc cfrincr VkncViplc 4-^1/-. of 450 QO 
JjcciUOj oLllllgj UUaiicl&j rto /2j "■I' tpv/.t7Uj . . 


. oy 


1^^ 


Tiopfo V»nc>iolo OQl/, of $0 fin 


. j.^ 


1 




r; 

. 


fiO 


r>id.cKiJcxiit?bj (-[UdrLbj oyjj di ipi/.±-±j . . 


7 


00 


RlnpV»pm'p« nnnvfsj of 410 10 


m 00 


20 


rsvnccplc cT^vr^iTfc infnQT»'fc 1 Ov oi* 4lO II 

J->X Ubbclo S5|JXUU.LOj m-ldl LOj . dL CpU.Xij . . 


11 

±JL 


99 


r'o'K'hcifrp frvnc 9 ^^41 of 419'^ 
^^dUUdgtJj lOIlSj ^i.tJ^±j dt tpiiJ, 


Oo 


(^9 


i^arroiSj uusxieiSj ±Xj at jpu./o, . . . 


Q 




9^^ 


PlnVlrpn nnnnrlts 101 4!0 9^ 

V^XXXl^ixtJllj |JUUXlLl&j S.\JXj <X.\j (pv/.^o^ ... 




9^ 


v>ora wooQj coras^ aX tp^.oUj . . 


1 QQ 


00 


Corn, gTeen, bushels, 84V2j $1> 


oy: 


ou 


v_/rdD apples, Dusneis, 072? "P-'-) 


Q 


f^O 


L/UCuiuDers, uoxes, oV /2j at if"' < • • 


fi7 


87 


Ciicninbers, pickling", pecks, 12, at $0.30, 


q 


fiO 


jjucK eggs, uozen, .^i, at jpu. ou, . . . 




fiO 
ou 


"Po-DM f\n70n f^O^X^o of 450 ^0 


1 f=i1 


07 


Ensilage com, tons, 185, at $4, 


74.0 


00 

uu 


J? wi, pounas, ^iUo, at «pu.±o, . 


^1 


90 


Hay, tons, 28, at $21, 


. 588 


00 


Lettuce, boxes, 5%, at $0.50, 


2 


92 


AfflniTrp bpn bnTTPlc! 1 nt ffti 

^*j.cxxi Lix v^, xicii, udxxcxo, -^-^j a^ ... 


18 


00 


Maple syrup, gallons, 12^2? at $1, 


12 


50 


Millet, tons, 21/2, at $5, 


12 


50 


Onions, bushels, 3%, at $1, . 


4 


12 


Parsnips, bushels, 13^/^, at $0.75, . 


10 


12 


Pears, bushels, 4V2> at $1, .... 


4 


50 


Peas, green, bushels, 8^^, at $2, . 


17 


00 


Potatoes, bushels, 57^/2, at $0.90, 


51 


75 


Pumpkins, pounds, 900, at $0.03, . 


27 


00 


Radishes, dozen bunches, 37, at $0.30, . 


11 


10 


Raspberries, quarts, 9, at $0.15, . 


1 


35 


Rhubarb, pounds, 171/2, at $0.02, . 




35 


Amount carried forward, 


. $2,334 72 



22 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



Amount brought forward, 


.$2,334 72 


Spinach,, bushels, IOV2, at $0.40, . 


4 20 


Squash, summer, barrels, IOV2. at $1, . 


10 50 


Strawberries, quarts, 9Y2, at $0.12, 


1 14 


1 oniaLoes^ greeny DusneiSj tt^ ai tpu.ou^ • • 




Turnips, bushels, 421/4, at $0.44, . 


IS 59 


Turnip greens, bushels, 31, at $0.35, . 


10 85 


Winter rj-e, tons, 3, at $5, .... 


15 00 



Fairview and Highland Cottages. 

Beans, shell, bushels, 1/2, at $1.35, . . . $0 67 

Beans, string, bushels, 81/2, at $0.90, ... 7 65 

Blackberries, quarts, 10, at $0.14, .... 1 40 

Blueberries, quarts, 10, at $'0.10, .... 1 00 

Beets, bushels, 21/3, at $0.60, .... 1 28 

Cabbage, tons, 1.26, at $25, . . . . . 31 50 

Corn, green, bushels, 12, at $1, .... 12 00 

Cucumbers, boxes, 1%, at $0.75, . . . . 1 25 

Eggs, dozen, 725/i2, at $0.30, . . . . 21 73 

Pears, bushel, 1, at $1, 1 00 

Peas, gi^een, bushels, 2%, at $2, . . . . 4 75 

Potatoes, bushels, 21, at $0.90, . . . . 18 90 

Squash, summer, barrels, 22%, at $1, . . . 22 40 

Tomatoes, green, bushels, 1^/2, at $0.50, . . 75 

Tomatoes, ripe, bushels, 2%^, at $0.75, ... 1 69 

Turnip greens, bushels, 3, at $0.35, . . . 1 05 

Turnips, barrels, 9%o, at $1.10, . . . , 10 89 



$2,397 00 



139 91 



Garden at Receiving Group. 

Beans, shell, bushels, 161/2, at $1.35, ... $22 27 

Beets, bushels, 6, at $0.60, 3 60 

Blackberries, quarts, 58, at $0.14, . . . . 8 12 

Blueberries, quarts, 1,377, at $0.10, ... 137 70 

Cabbage, tons, 8.28, at $25, 207 00 

Carrots, bushels, oYs, at $0.75, .... 4 00 

Cauliflower, boxes, iVio, at $1.25, ... 1 50 

Celery, boxes, 51/2, at $0.90, .... 4 95 

Chard, Swiss, bushels, 21, at $0.40, ... 8 40 

Cherries, quarts, 90, at $0.10, .... 9 00 

Corn, gxeen, bushels, 57, at $1, . . . . 57 00 



Amounts carried forward, .... $463 54 $2,536 91 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — Xo. 70. 



23 



Amounts brought forward, . 

Cucumbers, boxes, 37%, at $0.75, . 
Currants, quarts, 4, at $0.11, 
Kale, bushels, 11, at $0.30, .... 
Kohlrabi, bushels, 2, at $0.50, 
Lettuce, boxes, 77vi2, at $0.50, . 
Onions, bushel, Yzi at $1.10, .... 
Parsnips, bushels, 2, at $0.75, 
Peas, green, bushels, 2Sy2, at $2, . 
Potatoes, bushels, 830, at $0.90, . 
Radishes, dozen bunches, 6%, at $0.30, . 
Raspberries, quarts, 9, at $0.15, . 
Rhubarb, pounds, 69%, at $0.02, . 
Spinach, bushels, 6, at $0.40, 
Squash, summer, barrels, 7%, at $1, . 
Squash, winter, tons, %o, at $0.35, 
Tomatoes, green, bushels, 21, at $0.50, . 
Tomatoes, ripe, bushels, 26V2? at $0.75, 

Gardner Cottages. 
Apples, barrels, 17y2, at $2.50, . 
Beans, shell, bushels, 32V2, at $1.35, . 
Beans, string, bushels, 112y2, at $0.90, . 
Beet gTeens, bushels, 22, at $0.35, . . • . 
Beets, bushels, 167%, at $0.60, . 
Blackberries, quarts, 24, at $0.14, . 
Blueberries, quarts, 744, at $0.10, 
Cabbage, tons, 11.748, at $25, 
Carrots, bushels, 259, at $0.75, . 
Cherries, quarts, 40, at $0.10, 
Chicken, pounds, 1081/2, at $0.23, 
Cord wood, cords, 190, at $4.50, . 
Corn, green, bushels, 88^2? at $1, . 
Corn, whole, bushels, 199, at $0.75, 
Cucumbers, boxes, 12V2j at $0.75, 
Cucumbers, pickling, pecks, 94, at $0.30, 
Eggs, dozen, 439, at $0.30, .... 
Ensilage corn, tons, 90, at $4, . 
Fodder, cabbage, tons, 11, at $5, . 
Fodder, corn, tons, 40, at $5, . 
Fodder, rye, ton, 1, at $5, . 



. $463 54 $2,536 91 

27 94 
44 
3 30 
1 00 
38 79 
55 
1 50 
57 00 
. 747 00 
1 90 
1 35 

1 39 

2 40 
7 40 

24 50 
10 50 
19 87 

1,410 37 



$43 75 
43 87 
101 25 
7 70 
100 65 

3 36 
74 40 

293 70 
194 25 

4 00 
24 95 

855 00 
88 50 

149 25 
9 37 
28 20 

131 70 

360 00 
55 00 

200 00 

5 00 



Amounts carried forward. 



. $2,773 90 $3,947 28 



24 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



Amounts brought forward, . 

Fowl, pounds, 109, at $0.15, .... 
Hay, English, tons, 91/2, at $21, . 

Ice, tons, 40, at $3, 

Lettuce, boxes, 17, at $0.50, . . . . 
Manure, cords, 80, at $6, . 
Manure, hen, barrels, 9, at $1, 
Milk, quarts, 19,530, at $0.06, . 
Onions, bushels, 43%, at $1.10,' . 
Parsnips, bushel, %, at $0.75, 
Peas, green, bushels, 16, at $2, . 
Potatoes, bushels, 1,600, at $0.90, . 
Pumpkins, pounds, 6,897, at $0.03, 
Radishes, dozen bunches, 42%o, at $0.30, 
Spinach, bushels, 11, at $0.40, . 
Squash, summer, barrels, 49, at $1, 
Squash, winter, tons, 1%, at $35, . 
Turnip gTeens, bushels, 102, at $0.35, . 
Turnips, barrels, 320§^io, at $1.10, . 

HiLLCREST Camp, 
Apples, barrels, 32^4, at $2.50, . 
Beans, dry, bushels, 41/3, at $2.30, 
Beans, shell, bushels, 18, at $1.35, 
Beans, string, bushels, 31^/4, at $0.90, . 
Beet greens, bushels, 4%, at $0.35, 
Beets, bushels, 71^4, at $0.60, . 
Blueberries, quarts, 76, at $0.10, . 
Cabbage, tons, 61/8, at $25, . . . . 
Carrots, bushels, 70, at $0.75, 
Celery, box, 1, at $0.90, . . . . 
Cherries, quarts, 184, at $0.10, . 
Cord wood, cords, 72, at $4.50, . 
Corn, green, bushels, 78§io, at $1, 
Cucumbers, boxes, 63%, at $0.75, . 
Cucumbers, pickling, pecks, 18, at $0.30, 
Dandelions, bushels, 3i/^., at $0.50, . 
Fodder, corn, ton, 1, at $5, . 
Ensilage corn, tons, 45, at $4, . 
Grapes, pounds, 133, at $0.04, . 
Hay, tons, 3, at $21, 



. $2,773 90 $3,947 28 

16 35 

. 199 50 

. 120 00 

8 50 
. 480 00 

9 00 
. 1,171 80 

48 13 
38 

32 00 
. 1,440 00 
. 206 91 

12 87 
4 40 

49 00 
61 25 
35 70 

. 352 88 

7,022 57 



$80 


63 


9 


48 


24 


30 


28 


13 


1 


57 


42 


75 


7 


60 


153 


12 


52 


50 




90 


18 


40 


324 


00 


78 


80 


47 


81 


5 


40 


1 


75 


5 


00 


180 


00 


5 


32 


63 


00 



Amounts carried forward, 



. $1,130 46 $10,969 85 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



25 



Amounts brought foricard, . 

Lettuce, boxes, ISU. at $0.50, . 
Manure, cords, 2, at $6, . . . . 
Milk, quarts, 2,550, at $0.06, 
Muskmelons, ci*ates, 1^^, at $1.75, . 
Onions, bushels, 21/2, at $1.10, . 
Pears, bushels, 5, at $1, . 
Peas, green, bushels, 26^/^, at $2, . 
Pork, pounds, 900. at $0.09, 
Potatoes, bushels, 720. at $0.90, . 
Pumpkins, pounds, 5S2, at $0.03, . 
Radishes, dozen bunches, 2l9i2, at $0.30, 
RaspbeiTries, quarts, 9, at $0.15, . 
Spinach, bushel, 1, at $0.40, . . . . 
Squash, summer, baiTels, 27%o, at $1, . 
Squash, winter, ton, %o, at $35, . 
Strawberries, quarts, 12, at $0.12, 
Tomatoes, green, bushels, 2, at $0.50, . 
Tomatoes, ripe, quarts, 35, at $0.75 bushel. 
Turnip greens, bushels, 55, at $0.35, . 
Turnips, barrels, 7S, at $1.10, 

Yalley FAEii Cottages. 
Apples, barrels, 12, at $2.50, 
Asparagus, box, %, at $3.50, 
Beans, shell, bushels, 11^/1>, at $1.35, . 
Beans, string, bushels, 39V2, at $0.90, . 
Beet greens, bushels, IOV2? at $0.35, . 
Beets, bushels, 106, at $0.60. 
Blackberries, quarts, 183, at $0.14, . 
Blueberries, quarts, 2.54. at $0.10, . 
Cabbage, tons, 6.159, at $25, 
Carrots, bushels, 127^ '2. at $0.75, . 
Chicken, pounds, 174's, at $0.23, 
Cherries, quarts, 22, at $0.10, 
Com, sweet, bushels, 177, at $1, . 
Corn, yellow, bushels, 50, at $0.75, 
Cord wood, cords, 130, at $4.50, . 
Cranben-ies, quarts, 38, at $0.12, . 
Cucumbers, boxes, 41^2, at $0.75, . 
Dandelions, bushel, 1, at $0.50, . 



. $1,130 46 $10,969 85 

6 75 
12 00 
. 153 00 
2 33 
2 75 

5 00 
53 00 
81 00 

. 648 00 
17 46 

6 43 
1 35 

40 
27 90 
5 60 
1 44 
1 00 
82 
19 25 
85 80 

2,261 74 



$30 00 
3 11 
15 53 
35 55 

3 68 
63 60 
25 62 
25 40 

153 98 
95 63 
40 22 
2 20 

177 00- 
37 50 

585 00 

4 56 
31 13 

50 



Amounts carried forward, 



. $1,330 21 $13,231 59 



26 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



-3.//lOMII(6 OTOUyni jOrlCQra, ... 




01 


Fc-os; Anjan 1 6.S4 at $0 .SO 






Ensilage corn, tons, 45, at $4, 


ISO 


00 


Fodder, corn, tons, 10, at $5, 


50 


00 


T'^oddpr bflrlpv ton 1 at 




00 


"Pftddpr oat ton^ S at .'?v5 


40 


00 

\J\J 


Fowl T>ounds 151^ at $>Q 15 


22 


67 


Grane*; nonnd*; at ^0 04 




Q6 


X X C*^> ^ X.i^A 1 ^XXfcTJX^ LWJ_LO« (XL • • • 


315 


00 


Tfav mpadow ^on<s o af i^l^ 


60 


00 


Lettuce, boxes, 3%, at $0.50, 


1 


5S 


Manorpl "vrurzel^ bushels 12 at $0 25 


3 


00 


AfaTinrp r-nrH*; ^iS at f^li 

Ci. i-I LXX • \-V/XVXO« **v^«ClL^w« • • • • 


150 


00 


AfanTirp hpn haiTpl^s 30 at iSl 


30 


00 


Milk Quarts 8 J.90 at SO 06 


491 


40 


^klnskmelons. crate. ^ •■>. at SI. 75, 




87 


Oat straw, tons. 6, at $24. .... 


144 


00 


T'aT^ni'ns; bnchpl^ .50 at .*>0 75 


37 


50 


Ppafhp5 basket 1 at .<S1 *^5 


1 


25 


PpaT^: hii^hpl ^^a at iSl 




56 


T-^pii^ oT*ppn himlipl^i Ifi^o at 


33 


00 


Plnrng baskets .S^ o at J^O .SO 


1 


05 


Potatoes, bnshels. 1.S36. at $0.90, . 


. 1,652 


40 


Radishes, dozen bunches. 13^9. at $0.30. 


3 


92 


Rhubarb, poiuids, 15, at $0.02. 




30 


SmllioTi*; hrKshpls IS at $0 50 


6 


50 


Sninach bu«;hpl«5 fi^i at $0 40 


2 


70 


Squash, summer, barrels. S'^, at $1, 


8 


33 


Squash, winter, tons, 2.564, at $35, 


89 


74 


lomatoes, green, bushels, 0Y2, at &O.0O. 




75 


Tomatoes, ripe, bushel, 1, at $0.75, 




75 


Tui-nips, barrels. lei^B, at $1.10, . 


177 


32 


Watei-melons. S. at $0.15, .... 


-1 
1 


OA 

20 


Westiecs-stzs Cottages. 






Ar>r)lp5 baTTpls: 70 at .50 


$175 


00 


Asparagus, boxes, 1%, at $3.50, . 


6 


30 


Beans, shell, bushels, 5^, at $1.35, 


7 09 


Beans, string, bushels. 3610. at $0.90, . 


32 


85 


Beet greens, bushels. 7, at $0.35, . 


2 


45 


Beets, bushels, 103^4. at $0.60. . 


61 


95 



5,334 16 



Amounts carried forward, .... $285 64 $18,565 75 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



27 



Amounts brought forward, . 


. $285 


64 


Blackberries, quarts, 206, at $0.14, . 


28 


84 


BluebeiTies, quarts, 5S4, at $0.10, . 


58 


40 


Cabbage, tons, 2.546, at $25, 


63 


65 


Can-ots, bushels, 2SS34. at $0.75, . 


. 216 


56 


Chicken, pounds. 220, at $0.23, . 


50 


60 


Cord wood, cords, 112, at $4.50, . 


. 504 


00 


Com, green, bushels, 63^2? at $1, 


63 


50 


Cucumbers, boxes, 27, at $0.75, . 


20 


25 


Cucumbers, pickling, pecks, 46, at $0.30, 


13 


80 


Dandelions, bushels, 4, at $0.50, . 


2 


00 


Eggs, dozen, 619%2, at $0.30, . 


. 185 


85 


Ensilage com, tons, 43, at $4, . 


. 172 


00 


Fodder, barley, tons, 2, at $5, 


10 


00 


Fodder, barley, oats and peas, tons, 11. at $5, 


55 


00 


Fodder, corn, tons, 6, at $5, 


30 


00 


Fodder, millet, tons, 5, at $5, 


25 


00 


Fodder, rye, tons, 2, at $5, .... 


10 


00 


Fowl, pounds, 20714, at $0.15, . 


31 


09 


Grapes, pounds, 120, at $0.04, 


4 


80 


Hay. English, tons, 11, at $21, . 


. 231 


00 


Hay, meadow, tons, 8, at $12, 


96 


00 


lee, tons, 50, at $3, 


. 150 


00 


Lettuce, boxes, 6%, at $0.50, 


3 


30 


Mangel wurzels, bushels, 108, at $25. . 


27 


00 


Manure, cords, 38, at $6, . 


228 


00 


Manure, hen, barrels, 12, at $1, . 


12 


00 


Milk, quarts, 19,460, at $0.06, . 


. 1,167 


60 


Onions, bushels, 3914, at $1.10, . 


43 


17 


Parsnips, bushels, 70, at $0.75, 


52 


50 


Pears, bushels, 51/4, at $1, . 


5 


25 


Peas, gi-een, bushels, 5-^4? at $2, . 


11 


50 


Pork, pounds, 694, at $0.09, 


62 


46 


Potatoes, bushels, 452, at $0.90, . 


. 406 


80 


Piunpkins, pounds, 845, at $0.03, . 


25 


35 


■Radishes, dozen bunches, 3^^ at $0.30, . 


1 


00 


Raspberries, quarts, 20, at $0.15, . 


3 


00 


Pihubarb, pounds, 275, at $0.02, . 


5 


50 


ScuUions, bushels, IV/2, at $0.50, . 


. ■ 5 


75 


Spinach, bushel, 1, at $0.40, 




40 


Squash, winter, ton, %o, at $35, ... 


24 


50 


Strawberries, quarts, 202, at $0.12, . 


24 


24 



Amounts carried forward, 



. $4,417 30 $18,565 75 



28 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. [Dec. 



Amounts brought forward, .... $4,417 30 $18,565 75 



Swiss chard, bushels, 18, at $0.40, ... 7 20 
Turnip g-reens, bushels, 5, at $0.35, ... . 1 75 
Turnips, barrels, I371/5, at $1.10, . . . . 150 92 

4,577 17 

General. 

Beef, pounds, 6,609, at $0.06, .... $396 54 



Ice, tons, 435, at $3, 1,305 00 

Lumber sawed, pine and spruce, 47,977 feet, at 



Manure, cords, 250, at $6, 1,500 00 

Milk, quarts, 82,249, at $0.06, .... 4,934 94 
Mutton, pounds, 402, at $0.08, . . . . 32 16' 
Pork, pounds, 9,298, at $0.09, . . . . 836 82 
Veal, pounds, 744, at $0.11, . . . . 81 84 ' 

10,049 04 



Total farm products, $33,191 96 

Live Stock. 

Horses, 15, $3,482 00 

Cows, 55, at $50, 2,750 00 

Heifers (two years), 6, at $30, 180 00 

Heifers (one year), 9, at $20, 180 00 

Calves, 15, 250 00 

Steers (one and one-half to three and one-half years), 9, . 328 00 

Bulls, 3, . . . 250 00 

Oxen, 16, 1,266 00 

Sheep, 5, 30 00 

Hogs, 40, at $18, 720 00 

Shotes, 93, at $8, 744 00 

Pigs, 13, at $2.50, 32 50 

Hens, 342, at $0.75, 256 50 

Pullets, 352, at $0.50, 176 00 

Roosters, 77, at $0.50, 38 50 

Guinea hens, 10, at $1, 10 00 

Guinea pigs, 250, at $0.25, . 65 00 

Ducks, 8, at $1, . . . 8 00 

Rabbits, 17, at $0.75, 12 75 



$10,779 25 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



29 



VALUATION. 



Real Estate. 



Land, 1,608.01 acres, 


. $27,200 


00 


Water supply, 


. 27,594 


11 


Water tower, 


7,716 


40 


Drainage system, 


. 20,539 


54 


Heating system, 


9,737 


20 


Lighting system, 


. 12,335 


16 


Power system, 


6,342 


14 


Telephone system, 


1,255 


40 


Administration building, .... 


. 36,120 


81 


Belcher cottage, 


8,000 


00 


Belcher barn, shed and hen house. 


. 15,374 


77 


Birches (under construction), . 


1,752 


90 


Catalpa cottage, 


3,049 


62 


Domestic building, . . . . 


. 45,535 


47 


Elm cottage, 


4,762 


36 


Fairview cottage and barn. 


2,337 


68 


Gardner cottage, 


. 44,196 


84 


Gardner barn, silo and hen house, 


4,476 


92 


Green house (under construction), . 


460 


86 


Highland cottage, 


. 10,000 


00 


Hillcrest cottage (under construction), 


434 


09 


Hose house, 


. 1,000 


00 


Ice house, 


2,538 


41 


Maple cottage, 


4,892 


22 


Mechanics' building, .... 


4,869 


46 


Men's industrial building, .... 


. 6,500 


00 


Men's receiving ward, .... 


. 47,949 


00 


Old buildings, 


1,500 


00 


Paint shop, 


709 


50 


Power house, 


. 13,875 


71 


Pump houses (5), 


705 


00 


Stone crushing plant and saw mill, . 


. 2,799 


29 


Storage cellars (3), 


4,000 


00 


Storehouse, 


. 8,218 


00 


Amount carried forward, . 


. $388,778 


86 



30 GARDXER STATE COLOXl'. [Dec. 

Amaunt brought forward^ .... $3SS,77S 86 

VaUey farm cottage, barn and sheds, . . 3.938 33 

Valley farm annex and bam, .... 5.002 GO 

Westminster cottage, 47.612 19 

TVestminster bam, silo and hen house, . . 4.076 19 

Women's industrial building, .... 6.500 00 

Women's receiving ward, 57.740 00 

$513,647 57 

Ptrsoxal Property. 

Provisions and groceries, $2,351 26 

Clothing and clothing material. .... 14.946 88 

Furnishings, 36,3S1 19 

Hear, Hght and power : — 

Fuel, 6,939 31 

Repairs and improvements : — 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures, . . 4,865 18 

AH other property, 5,707 75 

Farm, stable and grounds : — 

Live stock on the farm, .... 10.779 25 

Produce of the farm on hand, . . . 10.139 10 

Caniages and agricultural implements, . 7,S11 25 

Fire apparatus, 804 56 

AH other property 2,476 85 

MisceUaneous, 2.902 71 

106.105 29 



Total real and personal propeity, 



. $619,752 86 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — Xo. 70. 



31 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Gardner State Colony. 

I respectfully submit the following report of the finances of 
this institution for the fiscal year ending Xov. 30, 1911 : — 

Cash Account. 

Balance Dec. 1, 1910 S3,534 24 



Receipts. 

Institution Receipts. 
Board of inmates: — 

Reimbursements, insane, .... $1,227 28 

Salaries, wages and labor: — 

Labor of employees, ..... 1 53 

Sales: — 

Food. .... $50 17 

Clothing and materials, . 300 78 

Heat, light and power, . 60 68 

Repairs and improvements, . 16 36 

Miscellaneous, . . . 107 55 

Farm, stable and grounds: — 

Cows and calves, . . 10 50 

Hides 103 11 

Ice, 2 90 

Simdries 73 39 

725 44 



Miscellaneous receipts : — 

Interest on bank balances, . $141 92 

Industries, .... 585 29 



'27 21 



Receipts from Treasury of Commonwealth. 
Maintenance appropriations: — 

Balance of 1910, $283 81 

Advance money (amount on hand November 

30) 7,000 00 

Approved schedules of 1911, $119,659 70 
Less returned, . 471 21 



119,188 49 



,681 46 



126,472 30 

Special appropriations, . . . . . 5,691 21 



Total, 



$138,379 21 



32 



GARDNER STATE COLONY 



[Dec. 



Payments. 

To treasun.' of Commouwealth, institution receipts, 

Maintenance appropriations: — 

Balance November schedule, 1910, 
Eleven months' schedules, 1911, . 
November advances. ..... 



$3. SIS 05 
119,1S8 49 
1,332 21 



$2,681 46 



124,338 75 



Special appropriations: — 

Approved schedules, ........ 5,691 21 

Balance, Nov. 30, 1911: — 

In bank, $5,171 91 

In office 495 88 

5,667 79 

Total $138,379 21 



Maixtexaxce. 



Appropriation. . 

Expenses (as analyzed below), 



Balance reverting to treasury of Commonwealth, 



$12S.000 00 
126,230 35 

$1,769 65 



Analysis of Ex pern 

Salaries, wages and labor: — 
General administration, 
Medi?al service, . 
Ward service (male), . 
Ward service (female). 
Repairs and improvements, 
Farm, stable and grounds. 



Food : — 
Butter, 
Bunerine, . 
Beans, 

Bread and crackers, 

Cereals, rice, meal, etc. 

Cheese, 

Eggs, 

Flour, 

Fish, . 

Fruit (dried and fresh) 
Meats. 

Molasses and sjTup, 
Sugar. 

Tea, coffee, broma and 
Vegetables, 
Sundries, . 



$15,350 OS 
4,412 66 
11.174 70 
3.S4S 36 
5.772 63 
3,659 77 



$97S 50 

1,745 94 
636 82 
145 70 
678 62 
96 09 
50 49 

6,751 54 

1,327 01 
226 12 

4,849 88 
139 57 

1,493 26 
781 40 
130 10 

1,195 20 



S47,21S 20 



21.226 2\ 



Amount carried forward. 



$6S.444 47 



1911.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



Amount brought forward, 



Clothing and materials: — 
Bof^ts, shoes and rubbeis, 
Clothing, ..... 
Dry goods for clothing and small wares, 
Furnishing goods, 
Hats and caps, .... 
Leather and shoe findings. 
Sundries, ..... 

Furnishings: — 

Beds, bedding, table linen, etc., 

Brushes, brooms. 

Carpets, rugs, etc., 

Crockery, glassware, cutlery, etc., 

Furniture and upholster^', 

Kitchen furnishings. 

Wooden ware, buckets, pails, etc., 

Sundries, ..... 



Heat, light and power 
Coal, 

Freight on coal 
Electricitj', 
Gasolene, . 
Oil, . 
Sundries, 



Repairs and improvements: — 
Brick, 

Cement, lime and plaster. 
Doors, sashes, etc., 
Electrical work and supplies 
Hardware, . 
Lumber, 

Machinery', etc., . 
Paints, oil, glass, etc., . 
Plumbing, steam fitting and suppli 
Roofing and materials. 
Sundries, 

Farm, stable and grounds: — 
Blacksmith and supplies, 
Carriages, wagons, etc., and repairs 
Fertilizers, %'ines, seeds, etc 
Hay, grain, etc., . 
Harnesses and repairs, 
Other live stock. 
Tools, farm machines, etc., 
Sundries, 

Miscellaneous: — 

Books, periodicals, etc., 

Chapel services and entertainments, 



S638 76 
71 65 

4,973 26 
299 99 
58 38 

1,983 57 
32 17 



S2,561 42 
185 25 

31 79 
357 88 
314 54 
767 52 

32 40 
598 22 



$5,489 49 
6,221 85 
92 61 
28 85 
178 15 
286 94 



S102 50 
1,046 05 
86 37 
1,208 86 
1,622 14 
1,609 16 
663 56 
1,246 46 
3,274 52 
226 70 
326 97 



$581 39 
1,157 36 
4,577 43 
6,996 63 
217 77 
86 35 
937 21 
124 38 



33 

$68,444 47 



8,057 78 



4,849 02 



12,297 89 



11,413 29 



14,678 52 



S97 22 

583 54 



Amounts carried forward, 



S680 76 $119,740 97 



34 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



Amounts brought forward, 



$680 76 S119,740 97 



Miscellaneous — Coii. 

Freight, oxpressage and transportation, 
Funeral expenses, 

Gratuities, ..... 
Hose, etc., ..... 
Medicines and hospital supplies, . 
Medical attendance, nurses, etc. (extra) 
Manual training supplies, 
Postage, ..... 
Printing and printing supplies. 
Printing annual report, 
Return of runaways. 
Soap and laundry supplies. 
Stationery and office supplies. 
Travel and expenses (officials), 
Telephone and telegraph. 
Tobacco, ..... 
Sundries, ..... 



1,922 78 
20 00 

63 28 
23 02 

48 61 

64 50 
155 43 
206 92 
163 26 
143 65 

51 16 
341 07 
329 91 
652 97 
393 04 
634 75 
154 27 



6,489 38 



Total expenses for maintenance, 



S126,230 35 



Special Appropriations. 

Balance Dec. 1, 1910 S3,068 85 

Appropriations for fiscal year, ....... 21,400 00 

Total, S24,468 85 

Expended during the year (see statement annexed) , S5,691 21 

Reverting to treasury of Commonwealth, . . 8 63 

5,699 84 

Balance Nov. 30, 1911, S18,769 01 



Resources and Liabilities. 
Resources. 

Cash on hand $5,667 79 

November cash vouchers (paid from advance money), 1,332 21 
Due from treasury of Commonwealth account, 

November, 1911, schedule, . . . , 41 86 

$7,041 86 

Liahilities. 

Schedule of November bills, sS7,041 86 



Per Capita. 

During the year the average number of inmates has been 660.633. 

Total cost for maintenance, $126,230.35. 

Equal to a weekly per capita cost of $3,674. 

Receipts from sales (includes sales for industries), $1,310.73. 

Equal to a weekly per capita of $0,038. 

All other institution receipts, $1,370.73. 

Equal to a wecklj- per capita of $0,039. 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — 



No. 70. 



35 



-^1 



I>. 00 CXD rH O O O 

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m CO rfi O 

r-( <M <M ^ 



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05^00 



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oooooooo 
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lOOOOOOOO 
CO O^O^O^CO^O^(M_^CO___ 
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oijcjcjcic^oc 

o" 2" 2" 2~ ilf llT Zh" 
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a; 

pel 



o 



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< 



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=^5r.So^v.| 

^ C d s 5P 

Ph a p; <t1 W ^iq H K 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



[Form prescribed by the State Board of Insanpty.] 



1 . — General Statistics of the Year. 





Males. 


Females. 


Toiab. 




41S 


207 


625 




35 


45 


SO 


viz.: by transfer, ......... 


25 


44 


69 




1 


1 






g 




9 


nominallv from ^^sit, ....... 


3 




3 


nominallv from escape, ....... 


6 




6 


Whole ntimber of cases within the vear, ..... 


453 


252 


705 


Dismissed within the year, ........ 


24 




31 


Viz.: discharged, 


in 
10 




10 


as recovered at time of lea\-ing hospital, 


- 






r^r^hl^ nf «.lf-,.,nnnrt 


* 




A 
4 




_ 












6 










died, 




4 


11 




3 




4 


escaped, 


2 




2 


on visit Oct. 1, 1911, ....... 


2 


2 


4 


Patients remaining Sept. 30, 1911, 


429 


245 


674 


^"iz.: supported as State patients, ...... 


422 


242 


OM 










as reimbursing patients, 


- 


3 


10 




445 


252 


697 




26 


45 






15 


7 


22 


Number of different persons recovered 








Number of different persons discharged as capable of self-support , 






4 


Daily average of patients 


424.546 


228.176 


652.722 


Viz.: State patients, 


418.916 


225.426 


644.342 


private patients, 








reimbursing patients, 


5 63 


2 75 


8.39 



40 GARDNER STATE COLONY. [Dec. 



2. — Received on First and Subsequent Admissions. 



NUMBER OF ADMISSION. 


Cases admitted. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


First (to the colony), .... 


24 


44 


68 


Second (to the colony). 


1 




1 


Total cases, 


25 


44 


69 


Total persons, .... 


25 


44 


69 



a. — A(je of Insane at First Attack and Death. 





Peesons died. 


AGES. 


AT FIKST ATTACK. 


AT TIME OF DEATH. 




Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Congenital, . . . . 


1 




1 








15 years and less, . 














From 15 to 20 years. 














20 to 25 years, 


1 


1 


2 


- 


- 


- 


25 to 30 years. 


1 




1 


1 


1 


2 


ou to oo yedib. 




1 


1 


1 




1 


35 to 40 years. 




1 


1 








40 to 50 .years, 


1 




1 


2 


2 


4 


50 to 60 years. 








3 


1 


4 


60 to 70 3^ears, 














70 to 80 years. 














Over 80 years, 














Total, .... 


4 


3 


7 


7 


4 


11 


Unknown, .... 


3 


1 


4 








Not insane, .... 














Total persons, 


7 


4 


11 


7 


4 


11 


Mean known age (in years). 


23.7 


32 


27.8 


46.8 


45 


45.9 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT 



— Xo. 70. 



41 



1 



« OB r; 

►J «^ 

Uz 

< 


•siujoj, 








1 








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Died. 




! 






! i 








Not 
imi'uovki). 


•siBjox 








" " ' i ' ' ' ' i ' ' ' 




: !M — i r-i 1 , 1 ^ i „ o 

1 j 


ImI'I(()\ !■ 1). 


■SIBJOX 






1 1 . 




. . , : . 1 , 






11.11 






a fa g 
5 ? ? 


■sib;ox 






, ^ ^ 














1 ■>9' 


















•S318K 




1 1 1 


a 
< 


•S]BJOX 






— C5 O 

— . ^ o 








lO 








o tn iTi 


< 

X 

C 


11 

^2 ~ o 

aia S >. - c >. 

s ^1 • "-si • -J ■ • • 

ii- -if . i . . . 
-1^ • • • • 

l.s1=|x-= 1 lilt 1 s i 
-S c 11 

i 1 ^ bii 

<: cq < < 



42 



GARDNER 



STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



Totals. 


•e|tj;ox 


O (M 1 1 


jH O 




t \ \ 


CO 




»o 1 1 


CO 


Died. 


•eiuiojL 


O ^ 1 1 






Ttl 1 1 1 


cc 




CO i-H , 1 




Not Insane. 








•83^X3 uiaj 




1 1 




1 1 1 1 


1 1 


Not improved. 


•BITJIOJL 


1-1 1 1 












lO 1 1 


CO lO 


Improved. 










1 1 1 1 






1 1 1 1 




Capable of 
Self-support. 


•siB^oj, 


1 1 1 




•eaiBuiaj 




1 1 


■ea{Bj\[ 






Recovered. 


■eiBlox 






•sa^Buiaj 




1 1 


•Bai'Bi\[ 




1 1 


numbp:r of admis- 
sions. 


First, 

Third 

Fourth, 

Total cases. 

Total persons first admitted to 
any hospital when admitted 
to institution from which 
transferred, .... 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 70. 



43 



Manic-depressive 
Insanity. 


•siBCjox 


1 1 1-4 1 1 1 1 1 




•sai'Buiajj 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


- 


Toxic Insanity, 
Chronic Alcoholic. 


•SITJ^OX 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


■ 




1 1 1 t 1 1 1 1 


■ 




1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 


■ 


Congenital Mental 
Deficiency. 


•eju^ox 


-H 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


- 


•eaiBuie^ 




1 








o 

o 

« 

s 
Q 


•siB^ox 


' - ' . 


CD 




1 1 1 T-l 1 1 (M 






[ i~l \ 1 ^ 1 ^ IM 




Aggregates. 


•BITS^OX 








1 1 1 ^ 1 ^ 1 <M 










CAUSES OF DEATH. 


Chronic diffuse nephritis. 

Mitral insufficiency, .... 
Purpura hemorrhagica, .... 
Pulmonary tuberculosis, 

Totals 



44 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 



[Dec. 



!5 e 

Pi 

M W ^ 

mow 



I I I I I 



I I I I 



it 

W fe " 



•sib;ox 



I I I I I I I 



I I I 

I 



HOSPITAL RESIDENCE. 


•sib;oj, 


1 1 1 t 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 


1 1 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 






1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




1 1 



Hi 



n 



o . 

« 2 
o a 



•s^'B:^ox 



I I I I I 



I I I I I I I I I 



I I 1 I I 



ro 03 m £ 

^ ^ ^ . - . - ^ 

i i S I I I I _ S 

"^coocqc^ioooaT . . 

. O " 

O D • O S 



T3 ^ 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — Xo. 70. 45 



1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ^ ec I 


1 


00 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


- 1 


1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I CO 1 


CO 1 


CO o 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 n 


1 


CO 


I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


- 1 


1-1 >o 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 »-l <M 


CO 1 


CO 

CO 


1 1 1 1 1 1 ^ CO 


O -H 


oc 

r~- CO 


1 1 1 1 1 1 —< ^ 1 1 


. CO 


CO oo 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ^ "H !M 




_ 


1 r 1 1 1 1 eo ^ 1 


t~ 1 


O 


1 1 1 1 1 1 — IM 1 1 


CO 1 


CO 

CO 


1 1 1 1 1 1 ^ CO ^ 1 


•>«' 1 


CO 

CO* 
CO 




to 1-1 


CO 
CO 


1 1 1 -H 1 1 1 1 1 


^1 ^ 


to 

CO 30 

1 
1 


— 1 -H 1 1 1 ^ t ^ 1 


1 




n. - Died: - 

Coiigonitivl, 

Under 1 month 

From 1 to 3 months, 

3 to months, 

6 to 12 months, 

1 to 2 yoara, . 

2 to 5 years, . 
5 to 10 years, . 

10 to 20 years, . 
Over 20 years, .... 

Totals 

Unknown, 

Totals, 

Average of cases known (in months). 



i 
I 



i 



\ 



-6 '16